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Full text of "Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1881/1892/93. Catalogue of the Alabama Polytechinc Institute 1893/1895"

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MICROFILMED 1 997 



Auburn University Libraries 
Auburn, AL 36849 



USAIN State and Local 
Literature Preservation Project: 

Alabama 



Ralph Brown Draughon 

Library 



Funded in part by the 

National Endowment for the 

Humanities 

Reproductions may not be made without permission from 

the Ralph Brown Draughon Library 



* 




* 



Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



4 



1881 






OCLC: 36819601 
Entered: 19970429 



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19970429 
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ISSN: 



19970429 
Lang: eng 
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Dates: 1873,1893 1 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. 1 
Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama *h [microform] 1 • 

► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 

► 10 24610 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Auburn, Alabama I 

► 11 24610 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama I - 

► 12 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama I 



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► 

► 
► 

► 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



260 
300 
310 
362 
500 
533 



Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, I 

21 v. ; *c 21 cm. I 

Annual I 

1872-73-1892-93. 1 

Title varies slightly. 1 

Microfilm. *m 1873-1893. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 



*d 1997. *c microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. 1 



d *b 1873 *c 1893 *d alu *e u *f u *g a f 
Universities and colleges *z Alabama =*=x Periodicals. 1 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 



^ 19 539 

► 20 650 

► 21 610 20 
Periodicals. I - 

► 22 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue and 
circular of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1 

y 23 78500 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project I 



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E. W. BURTON, Auburn, Alabama. 



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Time oi* 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 

-ANE- 

rmtion of" Office. 



I 



His Excellency RUFUS W. COBB, 

Governor of Alabama, ex officio President. 

Hoy. H. C ARMSTRONG, 

Superintendent of Education, ex officio. 



+ ■*» 



FIRST DISTRICT: 
Hon. C. C. LANGDON, Mobile. 

February 28, 1887. 

SECOND DISTRICT: 

J. W. HARDIE, Esq., Montgomery. 

January 4, 1885, 

THIRD DISTRICT: 
***-Hon. W. H. BARNES, Opelika. 
Hon. H, D. CLAYTON, Clayton. 
February 28, 1887. 

FOURTH DISTRICT: 
Hon, JONATHAN HARALSON, Selma. 

January 4, 1883. 

FIFTH DISTRICT: 
Hon. R. F. LIGON, Tuskegee. 

January ^, 1883. 

SIXTH D^TRIQT: 
Hon. JOHN W r BISHOP, Talladega. 

January 4, 1883. 

SEVENTH DISTItlCT: 

Hon. M. L. STANSEL, Carrollton. 

January 4, 1885. 

EIGHTH DIS TRICT: 

Hon. J. N. MA LONE, Athens. 

January 4, 1885. 



E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. 

F. M. REESE, Secretary. 




'FACULTY AND OFFICERS, 
c > >- v 

4tfr&** Rev. I. T. TICHENOR, D. D., 

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy. 



, * 

Commandant and Professor of Engineering. 

J. T. DUNKLIN, A. M., j 

Professor of Ancient Languages. 

W. C. STUBBS, A. M., 

Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 



Professor of Agriculture. 

P. H. MELL, Jr., M. E., Ph. D. 

Professor of Natural History. 

Rev. G. W. MAXSON, A. M., M. E., 

Professor of English Literature. 



N. ^^. «RfVEI& C. E., 

r instructor md-Aeting Commandant. 



C. McGEHEE, B. S., 

Instructor. 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D., 

Surgeon. 

WILLIAM C. STUBBS, A. M., 

Secretary of Faculty. 

Rev. G. W. MAXSON, A. M., 

Librarian. 



• The (Stain of Engineering and Agriculture have been temporarily filled during tha 
year by Professors Tichenoe, Stubbs, Mell, and Bivkks. 



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FACULTYIOFFICERS FOR 1882-'83. 



A 



Wm. LeROY BROUN, M. A., LL.D., 

President and Professor of Agriculture. 

J. T. DUNKLIN, A. M., LL.D., 

Professor of Ancient Languages. 

W. C. STUBBS, A. M, 

Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, Jr., M. E., Ph. D., 

Professor of Natural History. 

Rev. G. W. MAXSON, A. M„ M. E., 

Professor of Moral Philosophy and English Literature. 

Gen. J. H. LANE, C. E., M. A., 
Commandant andJPr<fessor ofMStmneering. 

Instructor of Ancient and Modern Languages. 

0. C. McGEHEE, B. S., 

Instructor. 

* 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D., 

. Surgeon. 

WILLIAM C. STUBBS, A. M., 

Secretary of Facidty. 

E. T. GLENN, 
Librarian. 






MILITARY ORGANIZATION. 



Commandant : 
Maj. E. R. RIVERS. 



CADET OFFICERS: 

Adjutant: 
First Lieut. R. F. LIGON. 



Sergeant-Major: 
W. H. CUNNINGHAM. 



Quarter-Master Sergeant: 
i> J. M. HURT. 



Color- Sergeant: 
0. L. GAY. 



Company A. 

Captain: 
B. H. FITZPATRICK. 

First Lieutenant : 
' A. M. CLEGG. 

Second Lieutenant: 
W. W: PEARSON. 



Company B. 

Captain: 
BARTOW EBERHART. 

■ First Lieutenant : 
HOWARD LAMAR. 

Second Lieutenant: 
E. N. BROWN. 



Company C. 

Captain: 
W. H. JONES. 

First Lieutenant: 
P. M. HUTCHINSON. 

Second Lieutenant: 
G. A. CARDEN. 



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Alumni of East Alabama College. 

__ »■' • 

1S6D. 

Rev. W. F. GLENN, Methodist Minister Newnan, Georgia. 

F. S. JOHNSON. Merchant .....Macon, Georgia. 

R. D. LUMSDEN • Crawfordville, Georgia. 

♦W. C. THRASH I Orrville, Alabama. 

A. F. WOOLEY, Farmer • Kingston, Georgia. 

1801. 

HENRY HARRIS S P arta > Georgia. 

W.M.JONES • Social Circle, Georgia. 

SIDNEY LEWIS .....Sparta, Georgia. 

R. S. McFARLAN, Clerk Superior Court LiGrange, Georgia. 

S. W. McMICHAEL, Merchant » Columbus, Georgia. 

H. P. PARK '• • Greenville, Georgia. 

J. J. F. ROGERS ....Perote, Alabama. 

1867. 

J. R. DOWDELL, Lawyer LaFayette, Alabama. 

HOWARD HAMILL, Prof. Ancient Languages Mexico, Missouri. 

1868. 

*W. W. MOORE, Lawyer . , > Birmingham, Alabama. 

Rev. W. T. PATILLO, Methodist Minister Oak Bowery, Alabama. 

1869. 

A. G. DOWDELL, M. D , Teacher... Opelika Alabama. 

L. A. DOWDELL, Lawyer ...Pilot Point, Texas. 

♦A. S. DOUGLAS, Minister ..Louisville, Alabama." 

LEANDER G. JACKSON, Prob te Judge Longview, Texas. 

T. J. LAMAR, President Female College Auburn, Alabama. 

CALEB LINDSEY, Ltwyer Mobile, Alabama. 

J. 11. MOTLEY. Fanner ....'. Tuskegee, Alabama. 

JAMES D. MYRICE, Farmer Midway, Georgia. 

R. C. PERSONS, Sargeon, United StatjsNavy. Pensacola, Florida. 

The Trustees and Faculty of Agricultural and Mechanical College of Ala- 
bama extend to thi Aluinni of the E ist Alabama College all the privileges of 
graduates in the former Coll g?. They request the graduates of both Insti- 
tutions to commuuicAte to the Sesretary of the Faculty their occupations, 
any changes that may take plase in their post-oifise • addresses, and any 
degrees that may be conferred upon th^m. 

* Deceased. 



-AJLTCJ IsAl 1ST I 

» — or— 

(Agricultural and (Mechanical College. 

1872. 

R. E. BURT, A. M:, Farmer Salem. Alabnraa, 

R. O. ROUNSAVALL, A. M., Teacher Huntsville, Texas. 

W. E. HORNE, C. E Tampa, Florida. 

L. V. R03SER, A. B.. Lawyer- Judg3 SupY Court... Colorado. 
Rev. E. W. SOLOMON, A. M.. Methodist Minister.. .Troy, Alabama. 
a. C. SPUENER, A. B., Sheriff Autauga County... Prattville, Alabama. 
Rev. C. R. WILLIAMSON, A. M., Methodist Min'r... Mobile, Alabama. „ 

1873. 

J. L. GOLSON, A. B., Lawyer... New Orleans, Louisiana 

W. T. RUTLEBGE, A. B., Farmer Crawford. Alabama, 

P. R. RUTLEDGE, A. B., Farmer Crawford, Alabama. 

1874. 

R. K. FITZHUGH, B. S Augusta, Arkansas. 

*B. H. JOHNSON, B. E., Lawyer Montevallo, Alabama. 

W. H. MOORE,. A. B., Cotton Broker...; Rome, Georsix 

M. H. MOORE, A. B., Merchant Piano. Texas. 

1875. 

FRANK C. DILLARD, B. S., Lawyer Sherman, Texas. 

Wm M. PERRY, B. S., Teacher.. Indian Territory. 

♦JOHN A. RATCHFORD, B. S ,;.... LiFayette, Alabama, 

EUGENE R RIVERS, C. E , Inst'r A. & V. College... Auburn, Alabama. • 

187<*. 

Rev. M. K. CLEMENTS, B. S. A.. Pr'p'l High School... Guntersville, Alabama, 

C. T. HODGE, B. S. A, Teacher Salem, Alabama. 

S. B. HOLT, B.. S. A , Manufacturer Siluria, Alabama. 

E. M. OLIVER, A. B., Editor and Lawyer *.LaFayette, Alabama. 

F. 1). PEvBODY, B. S. A^ Lawyer.........; Columbus, Georgia. 

J. E. RUFl'IN, B. S. A., Meivhaut Ro^k ford, Alabama. 

P. H. JSTOW, B. E., Lawyjr Mobile, Alabama. 

REESE WILSON, B. S. A., Merchant..: , Texas. 

1877. 

Rev. SAM'L C. RIDDLE, A. B., Mtthodist Minister.. .Pilot Point, Texas. 

CHARLES C. THACH, B. E., Teacher ...Athens, Alabama. 

JOHN M TRAMMELL, B. E ,LaFayettjMer. Mills... Chambers Co., Alabama 
WILLIAM O. TRAMMELL, B. E., Merchant... Chambers Co. , Alabami 

* Deceased. 



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8 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College.^ 

1878. 

LEMUEL G. DAWSON, B. E, Farmer Cowles Star, Alabama. 

SILAS C. DOWDELE, B. S., Farmer ^ TbamT 

TUCKER H. FKA^ERs B. E, Barton Acaden iy ......Mob>le, Alabama. 

P nn T p iTAttDAWAY C E., Eng'r Mex. C. R. R... Mexico. 

VpSSI P*of Nash. Feu. Col... Nashville Tennessee. 

*Is"\C A LANIER, B. E., Teacher ....Huntsville, Alabama. 

LEE S SCHIEFFELIN, B.E , Merchant Nashville Tennessee 

REUBEN L. THORNTON, B. E., Lawyer & Editor... Birmingham, Alabama. 

1870. 

MARK S. ANDREWS, A. B., Banker , Terrell, Texas ' 

WYATTH BLAKE B. S , Medical Student Blake's Ferry, Alabama. 

FRANK B. DILLARD, B. E., Lawyer Mobile, Alabama. 

JOSHUAS. DOWDELL. A. £., Merchant LaFayette, . Alabama. 

OLIVER C. McGEHEE, B. S., Inst'r A. &M. Col... Auburn, Alabama. 

ALLEN B. 0'H*RA, B. E., Merchant Sandtown, Georgia. 

THOMAS M. OLIVER, B, S. A, Druggist Montgomery, Alabama. 

JOHN PINCKARD, RE., Teacher Dadeville, Alabama. 

J. E. D. SHIPP, A. B., Lawyer.... Cusseta, Georgia. 

1880. 

JOHN T. ASHCRAFT, B. E., Teacher........ Brundidge, Alabama. 

♦BENJAMIN F. ATKINSON, A. B., Lawyer West Point, Georgia. 

SAMUEL B. CANTEY, B. E., Lawyer Fort Worth, Texas. 

SAM'L CALLAWAY, B. E., Eng'r Mex. Cen. R. R... Mexico. 

JOHN S. N. DAVIS, B. E., Nurseryman Gold Hill, Alabama. 

ALVA FITZPATRICK, B. E., Lawyer Montgomery, Alabama, 

E. J. GARRISON, A. B., Barton Academy Mobile, Alabama. 

GEORGE R. HALL, B. S. A. Farmer Midway. Alabama. 

HARRISON L. MARTIN, A. B, Lawyer Abbeville, Alabama. 

CHARLES B. McCOY, B. S , Physician Opelika, Alabama. 

ROBT. F. OUSLEY, A. B., Prof. Ancient Languages... Harpersville, Miss. 
HENRY G. PERRY, A. B., Principal High School... Decaturville, Tennessee 

EDGAR A. PRICE, B. S. A.,, Lawyer Nashville, Tennessee. 

GEO. W. STEVENS, B. E., Pi>d Roanoke Inst'e... Roanoke, Alabama. 

JABEZ C. STREET, B. E., Wiley & Co Atlanta, Georgia. 

ROBT. Y. STREET, B. S, Wiley & Co Atlanta, Georgia. 

JAMES J. SYKES, B. S. A., Farmer Courtland, Alabama. 

RjOSS E. THOMAS, B. E., Merchant Gadsden, Alabama. 

HOMER B. URQUHART, A. B , Bank Birmingham, Alabama. 

BARTOW L. WALKER, B. E., Signal Service Fort Meyer. Virginia. 

1881. 

W. U. ACREE, B. S., Prattville Academy ..PrattviUe, Alabama. 

J. CALLAWAY, B. A., Barton Academy Mobile, Alabama. • 

0. H. CRITTENDEN, B. E., Eng'r A. & P. R. R... Milton, Florida. 
* Deceased. 



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Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 9 

J. H. JETER, B. S. A., Farmer..... Opelika, Alabama. 

J. G. JONES, B. S. A., Farmer Montgomery Co., Ala. 

W. H. LAMAI£, Jr , B. A., Signal Service Fort Meyer, Virginia. 

J. M. LANGHORNE, B. S. A., Signal Service Fort Meyer, Virginia. 

J. T. LETCHER, B. E., Lawyer Dadeville, Alabama. 

A. J. MITCHELL, B. E., Signal Service , Fort Meyer, Virginia. 

C. N. OUSLEY, B. A., Prof. Marvin College Waxahatcbie, Texas. 

B. B. ROSS. B. A., with Flanagan & Co Auburn, Alabama. 

W. H. SIMMONS, B. A , Pr'n'l Prattville Academy... Prattville, Alabama. 
W. D. TAYLOR, B. E., Eng'r Mex. Central R. R... Mexico. 

J. D. TRAMMELL, B. E., Eng'r International R. R.. .Mexico. 

E. I. VAN HOOSE, B. S., Barton Academy Mobile, Alabama. 

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CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 

(BY CLASSES AND COURSES.) 

Sc. stands for Course in Science. Ag. Agriculture. C. E. Civil Engineer, 
ing. It. E. Mining Engineering^ L. Literature. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Banks, J. J., L... . Hnrtsboro, Alabama. 

Brown, E. N., L.. Hurtsboro, Alabama. 

^Carden, G. A., L.. ....Opelika, Alabama. ' 

Clegg, A. M., M. E Columbus, Georgia. 

Cunningham, W. H.,C. E Wood's Bluff, Alabama. 

x Eberhart, Bartow, Ag Columbus, Georgia 

Fitzpatrick, B. H., Ag Montgomery, Alabama. 

Hurt, J. M., C.NE Auburn, Alabama. 

N^Iutchinson, P. M., C. E West Point, Georgia. 

Jones, W. H.. Sc Union Springs, Alabama. 

Lavar, Howard, L Auburn, Alabama. 

Ligon, R. F., Jit., C. E. .....* .' Tuskegee, Alabama. 

Pearson, W. W. L....... Hackneyville, Alabama. 

Reid, J. M., C. E Tampico, Mexico. 

Stevens, M. S., Ag Rock Mills, Alabama. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Andrews, W. F., C. E Opelika, Alabama. 

Cox. W. S., C. E... LaG range, Georgia. ; 

Ellis, W. L., Jr., C. E Prattville, Alabama. 

Gay, C. L., C. E Montgomery. Alabama. 

Harlan, A. L., Sc Hackueyville, Alabama. 

Har,p, M. L., Sc... : Dawson, Georgia. 

Hurt, W. M . L.... Auburn, Alabama. 

Mangum, D. B , Ag Auburn, Alabama. 

Mangum, T. F, L Auburn, Alabama. 

McIntosh, A. M., Ag Dadeville, Alabama. 

Pace, E. M., Sc Newton, Alabama. 

Samford, N. P. D.j L....* Auburn, Alabama. 

Sutton, Rh L., L Opelika, Alabama. 

THIRD CLASS. 

Baldwin, B. J , Union Springs, Alabama. 

Bass, C. L .....Wetumpka, Alabnnn. 

Boyd, B. H ...LaPlaee, Macon Co. , Alabama. 

Boyd, L. R ....7T. LaPlace, Macon Co., Alabama. 

Corry, R. S ...Greenville, Alabama. 



««. 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College, 

Crittenden, L. F ..*.... c NotaRu'.ga, Alabama. 

Frazer, E. W.... k Mobile County, Alabama. 

Gaston, W. Z.... » H iwkinsville. Alabama. 

Gay, J. F Montgomery, Alabaina. 

Glenn, E. T., Jr. Auburn,. Alabama. 

Habdin, T. F * i Auburn, Alabama. 

Harrell, E. .Dale County, Alabama. 

Hill, M. E .Ntwnan, Georgia. 

Hutchison, J Brundidge, Alabama. 

Hutchinson, W. L West Point, Georgia. 

Holliday, P. J... Washington, Georgia. 

Johnston, M S Hamilton, Georgia. 

Killen, W. J... Snowdoun, Abibama. 

Lancaster, H. J Wetumpka, Alabama. 

Mangum, W. W Alburn. Alabama. 

Pearson, L. W Dadaville, Alabama. 

Redd, M. W Columbus, Georgia. 

Robinson, J. B., Jr ... Memphis. Tennessee. 

Slaughter, W. F r ..Auburn, Alabama. 

Smith, F. D .Prattville. Alabama. 

Smith, M. M ..Prattville, Alabama. 

Sutton, 0. M ......Opelika. Alabama.. 

Tyson, \V. S G reenville, Alabama. 

Urquhart, R. H .Auburn, Alabama. 

Williams, W. Z . E ifaula, Alabama. 

Wood, W. D 4 Prattville, Alabama. 

FOURTH CLASS. 

Allen, J.. #/ <<7>>^... :.. Morgansville, Alabama. 

Dallas, "V\ R.. ..... Lee County, Alabama. 

J^razer, P. G Washington, Georgia; 

Hood, W. J. L Clay County, Alabama. . 

Horn, J. T Beville's Store, Alabama. 

L Hunter, H. M.. Eufaula, Alabama. 

Johnston. A. S ........Hamilton, Georgia. 

McIntyre, E. S Evergreen, Alabama. 

Milton, W. H... * Mariinna, Florida. 

""Montgomery, W. A Lincoln, Alabama. 

Pfaxe, J. 13 Farmersville} Alabama. 

Pearson, J. E ....H»ckneyville, Alabama. 

T?enn, W. T , Cusseta, Alabama. 

Perry, F. H f. > Auburn, Alabama. 

Ross, C. H Auburn, Alabama. 

Slaughter; A. W Auburn, Alabama. 

Smith, J. C Good Hope, Alabama. 

Smith, R L * Dadaville, Alabama. 

"Stewart, W. W Columbus, Georgia. 



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12 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

„, m Notasulga, Alabama. 

Tbammell, T "■._ ■ 

Turner T. B Auburn, Alabama. 

' t a Abbeville, Alabama. 

Ward, J. A • 

Sub-Section— Fourth C lass. 

Allison, P. E A « burn ' Alabama ' 

Allison, G. A Auburn ' Alabam 

Ashurst, J. H Tallassee, Alabama. 

Autrey, C,M * • LaGrange, Georgia. 

Becker, Joe... Auburn, Alabama. 

Bennett, R. L Auburn > Alabama. 

Blount, J. W Pensacola, Florida. 

Bbadfobd, J. N Auburn, Alabama. 

Boykin, R. S Auburn, Alabama. 

Brown, J, P • York Station ' Alabama - 

Cade, R. L Auburn, Alabama. 

Campbell, L. D ■ Courtland, Alabama. 

Cope E. H...... • Indian Creek, Bullock Co., Ala. 

Dunklin, J. H * Greenville, Alabama. 

Gay W. D .♦••• Montgomery, Alabama. 

Goodwyn, R. H • .Mount Meigs, Alabama. 

Goodwyn, T. T Mount Meigs, Alabama. 

Hardin, J. W '. ,.....' ....Auburn, Alabamif 

Harris, E. W .-» Auburn, Alabamk. 

Hoffman, P. M ,., Auburn, Alabama. 

Hoffman, W. H Auburn, Alabama, 

Hood, J. L i • * Clay County, Alabama. 

Humphbeys, F. C Pensacola, Florida. 

Humphreys, W. H Pensacola, Florida. 

Labkin, D Larkinsville, Alabama. 

Lloyd, E. R Auburn, Alabama. 

Mitchell, A. H Hatchechubbee, Alabama. 

Mitchell, T. L 1 Hatchechubbee, Alabama. 

Moody, A. H Scottsboro, Alabama. 

Pebsons, A. A... Auburn, Alabama. 

Pebsons, J. T ....Auburn, Alabama. 

Pebsons, H. S Auburn, Alabama. 

Reynolds, B. R Srowdoun, Alabama. 

Royle, E. P., Jb Brown's Store, Alabama. 

Schowalter, M. R x Point Clear, Mobile Co., Ala. 

Shebbod, J. B * Courtland, Alabama. 

Shebbod, J. H Montgomery, Alabama. 

Thomas, J. D Dadeville, Alabama 

Wedgewobth, W. M Ackron, Alabama. 

Williams, E. M Centre Institute, Alabama. 

Zellabs, T. P Palmetto, Georgia. 



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mm 

Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 13 

— Special Students. 

Blackweldeb, W. M..., Tallapoosa County, Alabama. 

Reeves, D. D .,.". Tallassee, Alabama. 

Saunders, H. C Opelika, Alabama. 

Recapitulation. 

First Class 16 

Second Class .. 13 

Third Class 31 

Fourth Class „a^ 22 

Fourth Class— Sub-Ssction 41 

Special Students.... ; f 3 

Total 125 




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PSPMH 




AUBURN UNIVERSFJ. 
LIBRARY 




AU 
LD271 
.A?6 

•1881/82 
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ERMS OF 



Admi 



SSION. 



Candidates for admission into the Fourth .Class must be 
fourteen years of age, and a proportionate increase of a«e 
will be required for admission into the higher classes 

Applicants for admission into the Fourth Class will^e 
required to pass an approved examination in the following 
subjects: 

Exglish— Embracing Orthography, GranYmar, Elements of 
Composition, Geography, History of the United States, His- 
tory of England (Anderson.) 

Mathematics— Embracing the whole of Arithmetic (Rob- 
inson's), including the Metric System; Elementary Algebra 
(Robinson's). 

In addition tp these* studies, candidates who propose to 
take the regular course in Literature, will also be required to 
exhibit a satisfactory knowledge of the following studies in 
Ancient Languages: 

LATix-Grammar (Allen & Greenough), Ctesar (4 Books), 
Virgil (6 Books of the jEncid). 

GKEEK-Granimar (Goodwin), White's or Boise's First 
Lessons, Xenophon's Anabasis (2 Books). 

Entrance Examinations will be held on Monday and Tues- 
day preceding the openings in September and February, at 
which all applicants should be present. 

If, upon examination, an applicant should bafound deficient 
m any of the required studies, he shall be assigned to a 
course of preliminary training in those branches; provided, 
that in no case, will any applicant be admitted whose attain- 
ments in the English branches arc not such that he may with 
one year's training, be prepared for the studies of the Fourth 
Class. 

Students must enter regularly some one of the prescribed 



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Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 15 

courses but they may, in the discretion of the Faculty, with 
he wn ten approval of the parent or guardian, be asl g ned 

equtalnt $£* *? ** **» *** reckons, or 

Sat.sfactory testimonials of good moral character, will be 
mall cases required. ' 

Students, on their- arrival at Auburn, must report imme ■ 

nstucti U * 7^ a " d ^ ** testim'onLL Tnd 
nstruct ons. After having paid their fees to the Treasurer 

tbey wd report to the Examining Committee, by whom after 

xaminatmn, they will be aligned to appropriate elas Is 

EtsTtK their certiflcates of «&*«. « * S 

receipts of the Treasurer, applicants" will be matriculated by 
«ie Commandant, who will furbish to each one a copy of the 
Bogulauons, and assign him to his proper section ad 
[company. 

No student will be admitted to recitation in any class pre- ' j 
nous to matriculation. F 







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' Courses of Instruction. 

There are fo»r regular Degree 0ou«« ip this Initio.,' 
designated as follows: ,^ 

COURSE OF AGRICULTURE. 

Degree, Bachelor of Scientific Agricnltnre; B. S. A. 

II. 
COURSE IN ENGINEERING. 

Degree, Bachelor of Engineering; B. B. j 

III. 
COURSE IN LITERATURE. 

Degree, Bachelor of Arts; A. B. 

IV. 
COURSE IN SCIENCE. 

Degree, Bachelor of Science ; B. S. ^ 
Each of these Courses requires four years for its accora- 
plishment, and to entitle the student to the Degree he mus 
Si an approved Examination in the stu.es presenbed fo 
the Course For the first two years the studies in all of he 
Decree Courses (which" are the same as those pursued in the 
Freshman and Sophomore Classes of other Colleges) are iden- 
tical e'xeept that students in the Departments of Agriculture, 
Engineering and Science, may, if they prefer, substitute the 
Modern Languages (French and German) for Latin and Greek. 
Havino- completed the studies prescribed lor these two years, 
the student may select either of. the Regular Degree Courses. 
j i._-Course ix Agriculture. 

i The des ig n of this Course is -to furnish the student with a 
\ plan of study especially adapted to the wants of those who 
i propose to devote themselves to Agricultural pursuits ; not so 
much by training in the practical processes of the Farm, as 



[>. 



H 



. Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 17 

by affording instruction in the principles of correct husbandry., 
and in those sciences which relate particularly to the cultiva- 
tion of .. the soil. 

The Course requires four years for its completion, the first 
two years, however, being devoted to studies which are com- 
mon to the Literary Course, excapt that students who propose 
to take the Course in' Agriculture may, if they prefer, sub- 
stitute the Modern for the Ancient Languages. 

Having gone through this course of study, which is thought 
to be essential to' a liberal education for any of the practical 
pursuits of life, the student is prepared to enter upon the 
technical studies in the course, which occupy the remaining 
two years. These technical studies embrace the following 
subjects: 

1. Mechanics and Physics, in which the class makes three 
weekly recitations during the first year. 

2. Botany, two recitations weekly the Spring terms of the 
first and second years. 

3. Descriptive Astronomy and Meteorology, three recitations 
weekly during the second year. 

4. Geology and Mineralogy, tlje first three and the secpnd 
two recitations weekly during the second year. 

5. Zoology and Entomology, three recitations, weekly, 
throughout the second year. 

6. Agricultural Chemistry, with practical instruction in 
quantitative and qualitative analysis of soils and fertilizers, 
to which two hours a/e devoted daily throughout the first 

year. 

7 Vegetable Physiology, embracing the structure and habits 
of plants, and their relations to the soil and the atmosphere, 
occupying two recitations weekly throughout the first year. 

8. Cattle Feeding, embracing the principles of animal 
nutrition, the chemical and economical value of feeding stufts; 
two recitations weekly during the Spring term of the first* 
year. 



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18 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

9. Practical Husbandry, embracing the subjects of soils, 
their cultivation, fertilization, drainage and irrigation; Farm 
Crops; Farm Implements and Machinery; Farm Animals; 
Fruit Culture ; Market Gardening; Horticultural and Land- 
scape Gardening; in which instruction is given daily by raxt 
books and lectures during the entire course of two years, f 

For the purpose of illustrating and exemplifying the prin- 
ciples taught in the text books and lectures, the College is 
furnished with the following appliances: . 

1. An extensive Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet, and 
Museums of Natural History and Agriculture. 

2. A commodious Laboratory, supplied with troughs, fur- 
naces, balances, and the necessary chemicals and apparatus for 
making analyses. • <♦ 

8. An Experimental Farm of Twenty Acres, devoted to 
soil tests of fertilizers and experiments in the cultivation of 
field crops, grasses, fruits and flowers, under the supervision 
of the Professor of Agriculture. 

, In addition to the technical studies embraced in this Course, 
.the Class in Agriculture is required to make three recitations 
weekly in Political Economy, during the Spring term of the 
second year ; and also to attend lectures weekly upon Consti- 
tutional Law and the Law of Contracts, Conveyancing, and 
Landlord and Tenant, in which it is designed to furnish such 

instruction as will be of service to the practical agriculturist. 

> 

II. — Couese in Engineering. 

This Course extends the Scientific Course in Applied Math- 
ematics, and embraces full instruction in regard to the con- 
struction of common roads, pikes, railroads, bridges, canals, 
improvements of rivers, harbors, mining, &c. 

In aid of the practical studies of the College, and as a means 
of familiarizing students with the actual details of work, the 
First and Second Classes in Engineering may, at the discretion 
of the Professor of Engineering, and under his supervision, 
make visits of inspection to machine shops, mills, mines, 



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Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 19 

furnaces, and engineering constructions within convenient 
reach. 

The Senior Class of the Engineering Course, is organized 
as an Engineering Corps, and goes through all the necessary- 
operations for the construction of a railroad from Auburn to 
some selected terminus. 

Preliminary study of maps. 

Reconnoissance. 

Running Preliminary lines. 

Maps and Memoirs of same. 

Final location of road; Grades and Curves. 

Final Maps, showing Longitudinal and Cross Sections, 
Excavations, &c. 

The Field Work and Office Work, including Drafting and 
Calculation, are performed under the direction of the Profes- 
sor. Each step is accompanied by text book study and lec- 
tures. Examinations ^re made of Engineering works in the 
vicinity, and written reports upon them (with drafts) are re- 
quired. Both theory and practice are thoroughly taught. 

The work in this Course begins with the first Collegiate 
term. 

The Course in Drawing extends through four years. Dur- 
ing the first year the students practice linear and freehand 
drawing. In the second year the elementary principles of 
instrument drawing, embracing a course of orthographic and 
isometrical projections, shades and shadows, structural draw- 
ing and topographical delineation, are taught. This course 
is obligatory on the students of all the Courses, except the 
Course in Literature. 

During the third and fourth years, instruction in drawing 
is obligatory only on the students in Engineering. In the 
former year the system of instruction embraces orthographic 
projections, isometric drawing, shades and shadows, tinting in 
India ink and colors, the practice of drawing in sketches of 
tools, the finished work of machines, bridges- and other 
structures. In the last, or fourth year of the Course m 




I 






20 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Engineering, the indents are taught perspective. They then 
cease to draw for mere practice, and use their graphical .skill 
in machine construction, in making drawings of works visited 
in excursions to mines, furnaces, water, gas and railway 
structures. Plans, profiles and sections of railroad surveys 
complete the course. 

Drawing Instruments. — The instruments used at the Col- 
lege are the Swiss, which are preferred for their general 
excellence and moderate cost. The instruments, with the 
materials for geometrical and topographical drawing, cost from 
ten to twenty-five dollars. The student is advised to defer 
his purchase of drawing instruments and material until he 
comes to the College, when he will have the advantage of 
procuring them under the direction of the Professor of 
Drawing. 

The Drawing Room is fitted up with all necessary arrange- 
ments A full set of geometrical models is provided. A 
large number of photographs, lithographs and manuscript 
drawings— English, German ami French— have been im- 
ported. They illustrate the following subjects: General De- 
scriptive Geometry, Linear Perspective, Shades, Shadows, 
and Reflections, Masonry and Stone Cutting, Girders and 
Trusses of Wood and Iron; Furnaces, Boilers, Eailroad 
Shops, Depots, Offices, Machines, and their details, shown in 
the conventional colors used in France and Germany. 

A selection of portfolios in landscape, figure and classic 
subjects, and casts from the gallery of the Louvre in Paris, is 
calculated to meet the wants of students desiring to pursue a 
full course in freehand drawing. 

Students who propose to make Mining a specialty will 
receive special instructions in the three fundamental branches 
of the Art-mining, preparation of ores, and their metal 
lurgical treatment. 

Considerable attention will also be paid to Geology and 
Mineralogy with Blow pipe analysis, character of veins and 
methods for successfully searching for all varieties of ore 
deposits. 



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Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 21 

An ample collection of minerals is provided, comprising all 
species with which the Mining Engineer should be familiar, 
and to tins, students have constant access. The geology of 
Alabama, Georgia and North Carolina, where mining is con- 
ducted to any extent, is well represented in the Mineralogical 
Cabinet. ^ 

• A student who proposes to take the degree of Civil and 
Mining Engineering must continue a course of study at least 
one year longer, under a schedule prescribed by the Faculty. 
He must exhibit satisfactory evidence of his power to apply 
effectually by actual work the knowledge he has attained. 

III. — Course in Literature. 

This is the usual A. B. Course of American Colleges, and 
the plan of study is substantially the same as that required 
for this Degree in the best literary institutions of the country. 
It embraces a thorough course of the Latin and Greek Lan- 
guages, running through the entire four years ; the study of 
English in its linguistic elements, as well as its Literature, 
including Ehetoric and Logic; History, Ancient and Modern; 
Philosophy, Mental, Moral and Political ; Mathematics, Pure 
and Applied ; and Natural Sciences, including Chemistry, Bot- 
any, Astronomy, Geology and Physics. 

IV.-— Course in Science. 

This Course is intended for those who wish to pursue the • 
study of the Physical Sciences in a more extended course than „•• 
that prescribed in the Literary Course; with the privilege, at , 
the same time, of substituting the Modern for the Ancient 
Languages. 

.The subjects embraced are Mechanics and Physics ; Botany; 
Chemistry, including work in the Laboratory in Qualitative 
and Quantitative Analysis, or an equivalent amount of Latin; 
Descriptive and Practical Astronomy ; Mineralogy; Geology 
and Meteorology ; and Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

The purpose is to afford to the student every facility for 
Jhorough instruction, in the way of experiment and illustra- . 






22 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

tion, in connection with the text books and daily lectures by 
the Professors of Chemistry and Natural History. 
* The Chemical Laboratory is admirably fitted up for work 
in Analysis. It consists of a Lecture Boom, furnished with 
Counters, Pneumatic Trough, Gasometer and large glass case ; 
a Work Koom frith tweuty-five work tables ; a Furnace Eoom, 
*and a Balance Eoom. All are supplied with gas and water. 
Every student pursuing Analytical Chemistry is provided with 
a separate work table, the necessary chemicals and apparatus, 
a jet of gas with Bunsen's burners, and enameled water sinks. 
In the Balance Eoom are balances made by Oertling of Lon- 
don, and Becker of New York. An annual fee of $L0 is paid 
by students ifi the Courses of Agriculture and Science for the 
use of Chemicals in the Laboratory. 

: Museum and Mimeralogical Cabinet. 

The Museum is comprehensive in its scope — embracing 
many rare and valuable specimens. 

By a system of exchange, arranged with most of the prom- 
inent Institutions and a number of Scientists in the United 
States, large additions have been made during the past year 
to all the branches of the collection. 

The minerals have all been carefully arranged and classified 
according to Dana's System, and a complete catalogue has 
been prepared of all the specimens in the Museum. 



A 



mm 



COURSE OF STUDY, 

V 

FOR TWO YEARS* 

Preparatory to Special < ouws in Agriculture, Lit- 
erature, Science, and Engineering. 

(Note.— The figures indicate the number of weekly recitations required in 
the studies to which they are attached/. 



FOURTH CLASS. 

English First and Second Term—h History and Composition. 

Mathematics. First Tern-:* Algebra 

Second Term—Si Geometry. 

Languages First and Second Terms-:) French, or St Latin and 8 

Greek. 
♦Drawing First Term- 2 Freehand Drawing. 

Second Term— 2 Linear Drawing. 
IBook- Keeping First and Second Terms —2 Book-keeping and 8 Com- 
mercial Arithmetic. 
Military First and Second Terms-*- ft Drill. 

THIUD CUSS. 

English ........First Term— St Rhetoric and Composition. 

Second' Term— 2 English. 
Mathematics First Term— St Solid Geometry, Mensuration, Algebra. 

Second Term-Si Trigonometry, Surveying and Level- 
mg. 

♦Drawing First and Second Terms -2 Topographical Drawing. 

Natural Science ....Second Term -St Chemistry (Begins January). 

Languages First and Second Terms -St German, or 5 Latin and 8 

Greek. 
Military First and Second Terms -Drill. 

(Note. -Students proposiug to pursue the course in Literature, are re- 
quired to take Latin and breek; those proposing to pursue the course of 
Agriculture, Science, or Engineering, are required to take either French 
and German, or an equivalent in Latin. Monthly Exercises in Composition 
and Declamation are required of all Students of the Third and Fourth 
Classes). -■ ____— 

♦Not required of. thosTst^d^s^iTosing to take the Course in Literature. 

fElective. 



24 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

* SECOND CLASS. 

English . First Term— A English end American Literature. 

Second Term—% Logic. 
Natural Science.... First and Second Terms— 3 Mechanics and Physics. 

Second Term— 2 Botany. 
Labobatory First and Second Terms— r> Qualitative and Quantita- 
tive Analysis, and daily work in Laboratory. 

Agriculture First and Second Terms- 4 Animal Physiology; Care 

and Management of Domestic Animals ; Soils and 
Mauures. 

Law • ?••• ...First and Second Terms- 1 Contracts and Conveyances. 

. Military First and Second Terms- 1 Tactics; Drill. 

FIRST CLASS. * 

English Second Term- % Political Economy. 

Natural Science. ...JP*tf and Second Terms-* Descriptive Astronomy; 

a Geology ; 2 Mineralogy ; 3 Meteorology. 
Natural History.... First Term -3 Zoology. 

Second Term-* Entomology, "insects injurious and 
benetieial to vegetation ; 2 Botany. 

Chemistry First and Second Term*-'* How Crops Grow; How 

Crops Feed, and Manual of Cattle Feeding. 

Agriculture First and Second Terms-i Vegetable Physiology; Til- 

^ lage; Field Crops; Orchard and Garden Culture. 

Law FirHt and S e <*nd Terms-l Constitutional and Interna- 

tional Law. 
Military First and Second Terms -Drill. 

COURSE IN ENGINEERING. 

SECOND CLASS. 

E "° MiH FiM Te ™~* English and American Literature. 

Second Terms Logic 
Mathematics First Terms Analytical Geometry. 

Second Term-6 Differential Calculus. 
Natural Science ,..*** and Second Terms-* Mechanics and Physics. 

Second Term— 2 Botauy 

ESGIKEEB1NO ***'>*-* Hydro g r ap hical. Topographical, and 

Town Surveying, Theory and Practice. 
Second Term-', Line Surveying: Common Roads; 

Kailrowls; Canals; Tunnels: Staking out for Con- 
Btruction. 

D * iWn, ° *** Term-r, Bridge Drawing. 

Second Term (, Sketches of Tools, of the Component 

Str.!ctu°rL me8 ' aDd ° f Bridgc ' 8 and other 
MnjTABV ■■■Vint and Second Term.-i Tactics; Drill. 



V 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 25 

FIRST CLASS. 

Mathematics First Term—?, Integral Calculus. 

Second Term- & Practical Astronomy. 
♦Natural Science ...First and Second Terms— -8 Descriptive Astronomy; 

3 Geology ; 2 Botany. n 
Civil Engineering... First and Second Term*— 10 Building Materials; Mor- 
tars find Cements; Masonry; Wood and Metals; 
Strength of Materials; Arches; Framing Bridges 
and Road Making; Mining. 

Topographical < First and Second Terms -WYlms, Profiles, and Scc- 

Drawing. i tions of Railroad Surveys. 

Military First and Second Terms— Drill. 

COURSE IX LITER A TURK. 

SECOND CLASS. 

English First Term —8 English and American Literature. 

Second Term—?, Logic. 

Mathematics ...First Term—S Analytical Geometry. 

Languages First Term — (i Latin and Greek. r 

Second Term-\ Latin; f> Gretk. 
Natural Science ....First and Second Terms -3 Mechanics and Physios. 
Military First and Second Terms-~\ Tactics; Drill. 

FIRST CLASS. 

English... First Term-* Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

Second Term-?, Political Economy. 
Languages First Term—\ Latin; 4 Greek. 

Second Term — r> Latin ; 5 Greek. . 
Natural Science .... First and Second Terms -3 Descriptive Astronomy; 8 

Geology ; 3 Meteorology. & 

Military First and Second Terms - Drill. 

COURSE IN SCIENCE. 

SECOND CLASS. 
English First Term-S English and American Literature. 

Second Term-* Logic. 
Mathematics First Term- 3 Analytical Geometry. 

Second Term-6 Differential Calculus. 
Natural Science ....First and Second Terms-?, Mechanics and Physics. 

Second Term- 2 Botany. 
tCHEMisTRY First Term-* Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. 

Second Term-:> Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. 
Military..: First and 8e*md Ttm*~l footior* Prill 

instead of so.ne of the subjects ..longing purely to CIvUBrtf ^^"^ KC ° n ° mlC ' 
Geology, Mining Operations, Analytical Chemistry and AVork It. the Laboratory. 
tOptional with an equivalent course in Latin, Mental and Moral Philosophy. 



~26~ Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

FIRST CLASS. 

English Second Term—A Political Economy. 

Mathematics Ft'rd Term — 8 Integral Calculus. 

Second Term --.'» Pncticjl Astronomy. 
Natural Scuscv. ...Fird and S'cond Term* 8 I >< scriplive Astronomy ; 2 

Miner.ilogv : H Geology ; 3 Meteorology ; 2 Botany. 

Laboratory. -...« First and Second Terms— 10 Work in Laboratory. 

Military Fird and Second Terms -Drill. 

Monthly exercises iu Dt limatio'i an 1 Composition are required of all 
KtuoYniH during the first and s cond years, and the higher clnsses in .rll the 
courses deliver three origiual oratious during the year. 



TEXT BOOKS. 



FOURTH CLASS 

Robinson's Complete Algebra, Weutworth's Geometry, Bloss' Ancient His- 
tory, Essentials of English Grammar (Whitney ) French: Otto's French 
Grammar and Reader, Clm stomathie Francois.-, Gase's Dictionary. David- 
son's Linear Drawing, White's Art Studies. Bryant and Stratton's Book-Keep- 
ing, Bryant and Stratton's Commercial Arithmetic, Upton's Infantry Tactics, 
Allen and Greenough's or Chase and Stuart's Latin Texts, Cicero's Orations, 
Livy, Xenophon's Anabasis (Goodwin), Whita^Greek Lessons, Mythology, 
Latin Composition (Jones'.) 

TH[UD CLASS. 
Wentworth's Geometry, Olney's Trigonometry, Looinis' Analytical Geom- 
etry (new edition), Davidson's Projections and Model Drawing, Davies' Sur- 
veying and Mensuration, Bloxham's Chemistry, Otto Joyne's German Reader, 
Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, Adler's German Dictionary, Hart's Composition and 
Rhetoric, Selections from English Authors, Horace, Herodotus, Homer (Boise 
or Sidgwick), Latin and Greek Composition (Jones'.) 

SECOND CLASS. 

Loomis' Analytical Geometry (new edition), Loomis' Differential Calculus 
(new edition), Ganot's Natural Philosophy, Gray's Botany, Apgar's Plant 
Analysis, Church's Laboratory Guide, Caldwell's Agricultural Analysis, Amer- 
ican Farm Book, Jarvis' Physiology, Armsby's Cattle Feeding, Smith's Linear 
Perspective, Henck's Field Book, Barry's Railway Appliances, Hudson's 
Shakespeare, Shaw's History of English Literature, Logic, Coppee, Welcker's 
Military Lessons, Tacitus' Germanic and Agricola, Terence, Allen's Latin 
Composition, Demosthenes, Alcestis, Jones' Greek Composition. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Loomis' Integral Calculus, Mahan's Engineering, Mahan's Industrial Draw- 
ing, Lockyer's Astronomy, Dana's Minaralogy, Dana's Geology, Loomis' 
Meteorology, Hickock's Moral Science, Walker's Political Economy, Hender- 



^ 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 27 

son's Gardening for Profit, How Crops Grow, How Crops Feed, Tenney's 
Elements of Zoology, Entomology (Lectures), Mott's Manual of Chemistry, 
Wohler's Mineral Analysis. Rickett's Assaying, Barry's Fruit Garden, Hen- 
derson's Floriculture, Kemp's Landscape Gardening, TJmted States Artillery 
Tactics, Juvenal, Plautus, Cicero, Latin Literature (Bender) and Composition, 
Prometheus, (Edipus' Tyrannus, Greek Literature (Jebb) and Composition. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Daua-'s System of Mineralogy, LeConte's Geology, Loomis' Meteorology, 
Ganot's Natural Philosophy, Brush's Determinative Mineralogy, Freseuius' 
Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, Plattner's Blow Pip? Analysis, Cutter's 
Comparative Physiology, Smith's and Enthoffer's Topography. Rnnkine's 
Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Stoney on Strains, Wood's Roofs and 
Bridges, Merrill on Bridges, Warren's Machine Drawing, Dempsey on Drain- 
age, French on Farm Draining, Schmitz's S'.udent's Classical Atlas, Church's 
Descriptive Geometry and Shades and Shadows, Peck's Mechanics, Wiesb- 
bach's Mechanics, Mahan's Stone Cutting, Dubois' Graphical Statics, Simms 
on Levelling, Ernst's Military Engineering, Anthou's Classical Dictionary, 
Smith's Roman and Grecian Antiquities, Madvig's Latin Grammar, Goodwin's 
Syntax of the Moods' and Tenses, and Curtius' Greek Grammar. 



x ' 



* Degrees and Post Graduate Courses. 

The degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Agriculture 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Engineering, will be 
granted only to those who have passed satisfactory examina- 
tions in their respective courses. The completion of the Post 
Graduate Course of one year, will entitle the graduate of 
Engineering to the degree of Civil and Mining Engineer; and 
the graduate in Agriculture, Literature and Science, to the 
degree of Master in that course. 

Certificates of Proficiency will be granted Cadets upon 
completion of a special course of study. 
All degrees of regular courses must be conferred upon 

recommendation of the Faculty, approved by the Board of 
Trustees. 

Bad character, or college delinquency of any kind, shall be 
good reason for exclusion from a decree 

Each Graduate shall prepare and submit to the Faculty a 
thesis on some subject of immediate relation to the studies of 
his course, and read or deliver the same on Commencement 
day, if so directed. 

Applicants for degrees and certificates shall notify the Fac- 
ulty at least one term before Commencement. 

No Cadet of the College will be admitted to any degree 
unless he shall have exhibited to the President of the College 
a certificate from the Treasurer that his College dues afe all 
paid and shall have performed the exercises assigned by the 
faculty for Commencement. 



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PECIAL INFORMATION. 



7 



Department of military Science and Tactics. 

By the act of Congress for the endowment of Agricultural 
and Mechanical Colleges, in prescribing the required*studies, 
the words "including military tactics" are used. The act is 
designed to be faithfully carried out, by imparting to each 
student, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, practical 
instruction in the school of the soldier, of the company, and 
of the battalion. The duties of guards, outpost and picket 
service, are practically taught. The College is provided, by 
the State, with breech -loading cadet rifles, swords, and accou- 
trements. ':.•• 

The following uniform has been prescribed for dress, viz. : 
Frock of Cadet grey, three rows of College buttons; grey 
pants and cap ; trimmings black. A very neat and service- 
able dress suit can be obtained here, not to exceed $25, and a 
fatigue suit, not to exceed $18 ; sufficient, with proper care, 
for one year's service. This is less expensive than the usual 
clothing. All students are required to wear this uniform at 
all times during the term. , 

The drills are short, and the military duty involves no 
hardship. The military drill is health-giving exercise, and its 
good effects in the development of the physique and improve- 
ment of the carriage of the Cadet is manifest. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. The 
officers are selected for proficiency in drill and deportment. 
Each Company is officered by one Captain, one 1st Lieutenant 
one 2nd Lieutenant, with a proper number of Sergeants and 
Corporals. The officers and non-commissioned officers are 
distinguished by appropriate insignia of rank. These ap- 
pointments are conferred by the Faculty on nomination of 



30 % Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Commandant, and are continuous unless forfeited by mis- 
conduct. 

Free Tuition. 

The ^Trustees have authorized the Faculty to admit all 
Cadets free of tuition. This is not limited to residents of 
this State. No charge is made for instruction. An incidental 
fee of seven and a half dollars per term is made for servants' 
attendance in building, fuel, ordinary repairs, and use of 
instruments. 

A fee of two and a half dollars per term is paid to the 
Surgeon by each Cadet for medical services. Upon gradua- 
tion a fee of five dollars will be required for a diploma. No 
other College fees are required. 

Session Records and Circulars. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are 
kept by the officers of instruction in a form adapted to perma- 
nent preservation. From thiiPrecord a circular or statement 
is sent to the parents or guardian every two months. 

Examinations. 

There shall be a written or oral examination of the studies 
passed over at the end of each term. 

Special examinations shall only be held by order of the 
Faculty. 

A general yearly average of 70 (the maximum mark being 
100) in scholarship will be required to pass a student from 
any class to the next higher, and if a mark less than 60 is 
attained in any study, he shall, in addition, be required to 
pass another examination in that study at the beginning of 
the ensuing session, before being allowed to pass up; and if 
found deficient on account of neglect of study, he may be 
dismissed. 

It is particularly required that every student who enters 
the College shall remain through the examination at the end 
of the term. Leaves of absence and honorable discharges 
will, therefore, not be granted within six weeks of the exam- 
ination, except in extreme cases. 






Alabama Ayricuilural and Mechanical College. 31 

Examinations for Degrees or Certificates of Proficiency 
embrace in their scope the entire subject of study in the 

course. 

Discipline. 

Military Science and Tactics are required to be taught in 
this Institution, both by law of Congress and by act of the 
State Legislature. The discipline is modeled after that of 
the best military schools. The government of the College is 
administered by the President, Commandant and Faculty,' in 
accordance with the Code of Laws and Regulations enacted 
by the Trustees and published; each student upon matricula- 
tion being furnished with a copy. 

The strictest attention to study, and the most exact punc- 
tuality in attendance on recitations, and all other duties, will 
be made the condition of every student's continuance at the 

College. . . 

Students are prohibited from having in their possession 
ammunition, weapons, or arms not issued for the performance 
of military duty. 

Religious Services. 

Religious services are held every morning in the Chapel. 

The students are required to attend these exercises, and 
also to attend the church of their choice at least once on 
Sunday. Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible 

Clas-es every Sunday. • „ . . v „a 

By statute of the State the sale of spirituous liquors .and 

keeping of gaming saloons of every kind within five miles of 

Auburn are forbidden. , . . -, 

The College will be carefully preserved from the control or 

domination of any party or sect in religion or politics. 

Location and Building. 
The College is situated in the town of Auburn sixty ™les 

from Montgomery, directly on the line of the Western 

Railroad. , healthful-821 feet above tide water ; 

T *elSS & «i w-Sft and is we " f " rnished 

with rooms for cbllege use. 

* Societies. w , 

There „ two f^l^^t \ "^clt 

S^=?« S£y » f « a " tod md ■** 



82 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

laneous works, and a reading room. Their weekly exercises 
add to the facilities afforded by the College for practice in 
composition, elocution and discussion. 

Society of Alumni. 

The annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the Society, 
is delivered in the Chapel, Monday evening of Commencement 
week. 

Young Men's Christian Association. 

This Association comprises the students who arc members 
of churches. Its object is to promote the religious character 
and usefulness of those connected with it. Weekly meetings 
are held, and public addresses occasionally delivered. 

Boarding. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, will not be 
permitted to make changes without obtaining permission of 
the Faculty, having first given two weeks' notice. 

The Faculty will feel authorized to remove students from 
boarding-houses when it becomes manifest that they are fail- 
ing in their duties from improper associations, or for any other 
reason demanding such removal. 

Pareuts and guardians are advised to send all money for 
payment of tuition and board to the Treasurer of the College, 
with instructions for its appropriation. 

Expenses. 

Tuition free to all Cadets in or out of the State. 

Incidental fee, per term, in advance.. $7 50 

, Library fee 2 00 

Surgeon fee 2 50 

Board, in private families, per month $12 to 15 00 

Academic Year. 

The academic year, which is divided into two equal terms, 
commences on the last Wednesday in September, and epds on 
the last Wednesday in June following, which is Commence- 
ment day. The second term begins on the second Wednesday 
in February. 

ISP No intermission at Christmas, except for one day ; and 
parents are earnestly requested not to grant their sons per- 
mission to go home at that season, except in cases of pressing 
importance, as their absence seriously disarranges the exercises 
of the classes, and is very disadvantageous to the youn°" men 
themselves. 



DEGREES CONFERRED. 



Session 18 81V83. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

Brown, E. N Hurtsboro, Alabama. 

Carden, G. A Opelika, Alabama. 

Lamab, Howard Auburn, Alabama. 

Pearson, W. W Hackneyville, Alabama. 

BACHELOR OF AGRICULTURE. 

Eberhart, Bartow ."..Columbus, Georgia. 

Fitzpatriok, B. H . .Montgomery, Alabama. 

BACHELOR OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Cunningham, W. H Wood's Bluff, Alabama. 

Hurt, J. M . Auburn, Alabama. 

Ligon, R. F., Jr .• Tuskegee, Alabama. 

Reid, J. M ....'. Tampico, Mexico. 

BACHELOR OF MINING ENGINEERING. 
Clegg, A. M ....Columbus, Georgia. 



Jones, W. H. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 
Union Springs, Alabama. 



DOCTOR OF DIVINITY. 
Rev. T. F. Mangum ........ Auburn, Alabama. 

DOCTOR OF LAWS. 

Hon. John A. Foster Clayton, Alabama. 

Prop. James F. Park ..Tuskegee, Alabama. 

PRIZES. 

W. J. KiLLEN>,|or Excellence in Chemistry ......Medal 

W. D. Wood, frcjpclllence in Chemistry .....Medal 

W. H. Milton, forExcellence in Declamation-Fourth Class ......Book 

B. J. Baldwin, for Excellence in Declamation-Third Class First Prize 

W. W. Mangum, for Excellence in Declamation-Third Class... Second Prize 

C. L. Bass, for Excellence in Declamation-Third Class Third Prize 



jt 



OOnSTTIR-IIBTTTIO KTS 

TO THE 



Mineralogical and Zoological (jtaum 

During Session of 1881- '82. 






The following persons have made valuable additions to the various 
branches of the Museum : 

J. N. Bradford, W. D. Taylor, Walter Hoffman, Paul Hoffman, 
Mrs. 0. D. Smith, Prof. O. D. Smith, Rev. E. Y. Van Hoose, Otis 
Smith, Jr., Harry Smith, Miss Pauline Dillard, Bartow Eberhart, 
Mrs. Allen, Prof. G. W. Maxson, Mrs. G. W. Maxson, Edgar Max- 
son, J. H. McCary, Prof. J. T. Dunklin, Joe Hollifield, F. Hum- 
phreys, Mrs. Humphreys, J. T. Romine, R. L. Fah, J. M. Reid, 
Miss Maud Glenn, J. Hutchison, R. G. Southall, Jr., J. W. Blount, 
J. M. Hurt, Howard Lamar, Prof. W. C. Stubbs, W. Z. Williams, 
Master Persons, J. H. Ashurst, L. A. Trumbo, Charles Glenn, Miss 
Mary E. Reese, Dr. Jackson. 

Dr. R. C. Persons, U. S. N., valuable specimens of deep sea 
soundings. 

Mrs. James Schuyles, San Mateo County, California. 

Mrs. A. E. Bush, fine Botanical specimens from California. 

Profy 1 Jacques de Morgan, of the Paris School of Mines, sent 4,813 
specimens of Tertiary Fossils from the Paris Basin. 

184 specimens of Woods from the Census Bureau. 

The following specimens have been contributed to the Industrial 
Collection by Manufacturers, and others, throughout the United 
States : 

A Miner's Lamp by Leonard Bros., Scran ton, Pa. 

Specimens from Jenkins' Patent Sheet Packing Company, New 
York. 

Specimens from Porter Iron Rooting Company, Chicago, 111. 

Metallic Shingles and Corrugated Sheet Iron Siding, Anglo Amer- 
ican Roofing Co., New York. 

Specimens from Phosphor Bronze Smelting Company, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Illustrated Plates of Screws, American Screw Co., Providence, R. I. 

Specimens from Harwood Chair Seat Co., Boston, Mass. 

Felt Ceiling and Roofing, W. J. Fay, Camden, N. J. 

Specimens from National Barbed Wire Fence Co., New York. 

Specimens from Hawkeye Steel Barbed Wire Fence Co., Burling- 
ton, Iowa. 



J 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 35 

Samples from Cincinnati Barbed Wire Fence Co,, Cincinnati, 0. 

Low's Art Tiles, Wellington & Burrage, Boston, Mass. 

Specimens from American Solid Leather Button Company, Provi- 
dence, K. I. 

Specimens of Nuts, Washers, Chain-links, Bolts, Boiler, and 
Cooper Rivets, &c; Hoopes & Townsend, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Specimens from Robert Aitchison Perforated Metal Company, 
Chicago, 111. 

Solid Drawn Steel Tube, Philip S. Justice & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Machinery Wiper Cloths, Brown Manufacturing Company, Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Morton's Sash Chains, Thomas Morton, New York. 

Specimens of Round and Bar Iron, and Fish Bar and Railroad 
Iron; also, samples illustrating fibre and strength of iron; Lookout 
Rolling Mills, Chattanooga, Tenn. 



List of Contributors to Agricultural Department. 

TO AGRICULTURAL MUSEUM. 

Landreth & Sons. .....Philadelphia, Penn. 

Peter Henderson & Co New York, N. Y. 

Thorburn & Co ...New York, N. Y. 

Director General H. I. Kimball ~) 

Kansas Exhibition I 

South Carolina Exhibition .' I Atlanta Cotton Exposition. 

North Carolina Exhibition 

Florida Exhibition I 

And Many Private Exhibitors J 

Marks & Fitzpatrick...... Montgomery, Ala. 

Jas. E. Strom, Bullock, Co., 

A. B. Buchanan. Bussell Co., 

Mrs. E. A. Howell '. Smith's Station, 

Wm. C. Bee& Co., Charleston, S. C. 

Dr. K. H. Bragaw Auburn, Ala. 

Messrs J. A. Holifield & Co.; ■••; V 

Geo. W. Dixon, • 

0. D. Grout, ;•- ;• u 

Montgomery Oil Works Montgomery, 

Central Oil Works.... ..Selma, 

Mr. J. C. Moore ' ....Auburn, " 

Mr. J. T. Harris . ti 

Mr. Lewis Foster •••• it u 

Mr. Alex. Frazer • u 4 . 

Capt. A. A. Allison (i lt 

Mr. A. F. McElhaney : V ~ 

Mr. B. H. Reynolds' • Lee C °" 






.. 



TO FARM. 

wj.ui ~ ^ T3 v ^ Charleston, S. C. 

™" n C ; Bee <fc Co ; m ^ 

Centra! ,1 M. 8 • V Montgomer y, Ala. 

Montgomery Oil Mills..., Talladega, Ala. 

«t b .". ....Dallas County, Ala. 

McKennon 




207867 




X 



CALENDAR FOR 18 



Entrance Examinations Monday and Tuesday, September 

25th and 26th. 

First Term begins Wednesday, September 27tt. 
Second Term begins February 12th, 1883. 

Sunday, June 24. 
Commencement Sermon. 

Monday, June 25. 

Prize Declamation. 

Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

Dress Parade. ; * 

Alumni Adress. 

Tuesday, June 26. 

Orations •-• Second Class 

Address to the Societies. 

Eeview of Corps , by the Governor 

Dress Parade. 

Wednesday, June 27. 

Orations......: Graduating Class 

Baccalaureate Address and Conferring Degrees by the Pres- 

ident. 

Dress Parade. 

Levee. 



^- 



Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



1882 



OCLC: 36819601 
Entered: 19970429 



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Dates: 1873 , 


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b *h a *i u *j p I 



Type: a ELvl: 
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S/L: Orig: 
Desc: a SrTp: 

AAA *c AAA f 

h *b c *d b *e f *f u *g 

n-us-al I 

LD271 *b .A76 I 

*b I 

AAAA I 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama, f 

Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama *h [microform] I 

► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 10 24610 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Auburn, Alabama f 

► 11 246 10 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama f 

► 12 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama I 

Auburn, # Ala. : *b The College, I 
21 v. ; *c 21 cm. I 
Annual 1 

1872-73-1892-93. I 
Title varies slightly. I 

Microfilm. *m 1873-1893. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
:rof ilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. 1 
d *b 1873 *c 1893 *d alu *e u *f u *g a 1 
Universities and colleges *z Alabama *x Periodicals. 1 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue and 
circular of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1 
►23 785 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project 1 



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Periodicals . I 


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AUBURN UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY 




AU 
LD271 
.A76 
1882/83 
c.2 




This book must not be taken 
from the Library building. 




CATJ- 





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R. W. BURTON, ALABAMA. 



Board of Trustees, 

AND 

TiniB of Expiration ut Officii 



His Excellency, RUFUS W. COBB, 
Governor of Alabama, e.c officio President 

Hon. H. C. ARMSTRONG, 

Superintendent of Education, ex officio. 



FIRST DISTRICT: . 
Hon. C. C. LANGDON, Mobile. 
February 28, 1887. 

SECOND DISTRICT: 

J. W. HARDIE, Esq., Montgomery. 

January 4, 1885. 

THIRD DISTRICT: 
Hon. W. II. BARNES, Opelika. 
Hon. H. D. CLAYTON, Clayton. 

February 28, 1887. 

FO URTH DISTRICT : 
Hon. JONATHAN HARALSON, Selma, 

January 4, 1889. 

FIFTH DISTRICT: 
' Hon. R. F. LIGON, Tuskegee. 
January 4, 1889. 

SIXTH DISTRICT: 

Hon. JOHN W. BISHOP, Talladega, 

January 4, 1889. 

SEVENTH DISTRICT: 

Hon. M. L. ST ANSEL, Carrollton, 

January 4, 1885. 

EIGHTH DISTRICT: 
f Hon. J. N. MALONE, Athens. 
January 4, 1885. 



E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. 

F. M. REESE, Secretary, 







S Q*\£ 



Faculty and Officers 



FOR 1882- , 83. 




Wm. LeROY BROUN, M. A., LL.D., 

President. 

J. T. DUNKLIN, A. M., LL.D., 

Professor of Ancient Languages. 

W. C. STUBBS, A. M., 

Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, Jr., M. E., Ph. D., 

Professor of Natural History. 

Rev. G. W. MAXSON, A. M., M. E., 
Professor of Moral Philosophy and English Literature. 

Gen. J. H. LANE, C. E., M. A., 
Professor of Civil Engineering and Commandant. 



Professor of Agriculture. 

C. G. THACH; B. E., 
Instructor of Ancient and Modern Languages. 

T. H. FRAZER, B. E., 

Instructor. < 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D., 
Surgeon. 

WILLIAM C. STUBBS, 

Recording Secretary . 

P. H. MELL, Jr., 
Corresponding Secretary. 

E. T. GLENN, 
Librarian. 




ore 



•mmmmmm 



V 



Military Organization. 



Wm. LeROY BROUN, M. A., LL.D., President. 
Gen. J AMES. H. LANE, Commandant. 
J. H. DRAKE, M. D., Surgeon. 



CADET OFFICERS. 

Staff. 

W. S. COX, Adjutant. • W. J. KILLEN, Sergeant Major. 

B. H. BOYD, Color Sergeant. 



Company A. 

Captain, C. L. Gay. . 
tit Lieut., A. L. Harlan. 
8d Lieut., E. M. Pace. 

tit Sergt., W. L. Hutchinson. 
2d Sergt, R. S. Court. 
3d Sergt., D. D. McLeod. 



Company B. 

Captain, T. F. Mangum. 
1st Lieut., R. L. Sutton. 
2d Lieut., W. L. Ellis, Jr. 

tit Sergt, J. B. Robinson, Jr. 

2d Sergt, W. D. Wood. 

3d Sergt, L. F. Crittenden. 



Company C. 

Captain, A. M. McIntosh. 
tit Lieut, jy? B. Mangum. 
2d Lieut, M. L. Harp. 

1st Sergt, M. E. Hill. 
2d Sergt, Zell Gaston. 
3d Sergt, T. R. McCarty. 



_ 



ALUMNI. 



/ 



4 



I860. 

Rev. W. F. GLENN..., Newnan, Georgia. 

F. 8. JOHNSON Macon, Georgia. 

Jt. D. LUMSDEN Crawfordville, Georgia. 

*W. 0. THRASH Orrville, Alabama. 

A. F. WQOLEY Kingston, Georgia. 

^ 1861. 

HENRY HARRIS Spurta, Georgia. 

W. M. JONES Social Circle, Georgia. 

SIDNEY LEWIS Sparta, Georgia. 

B. S. McFARLAN LaGrange, Georgia. 

S. W. McMICHAEL ......... Columbus, Georgia. 

H. P. PARK. , Greenville, Georgia. 

J. J. F. ROGERS Perote, Alabama. 

' 1867. 

J. R. DOWDELL LaFayette, Alabama. 

HOWARD HAMILL Mexico, Missouri. 

1868. 

*W. W. MOORE . Birmingham, Alabama. 

Rev. W. T. PATILLO Oak Bowery, Alabama. 

1869. 

A. G. DOWDELL Opelika, Alabama. 

L. A. DOWDELL Monterey, Mexico. 

*A. 8. DOUGLAS &fe Louisville, Alabama. 

LEANDER G. JACKSON Longview, Texas. 

T. J. LAMAR Auburn, Alabama. 

CALEB LINDSEY Mobile, Alabama.. 

J. R. MOTLEY. ...7. Tuskegee, Alabama. 

JAMES D MYRICK Midway, Alabama. 

R. C. PERSONS Pensacola, Florida. 

The classes of I860, 1861, 1867, 1868, 1869 graduated in the East Alabama 

College. 

«> — _ — — — — — — ' c 

•Deceased. 






6 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

1872. 

R. E. BURT, A. M , Salem > Alabama. 

B. 0. ROUNSAVALL, A. M Waco ' Texas - 

W. E. HORNE, C. E. Tam P a » noTldiL 

L. V. R08SER, A. B Colorado. 

Rev. E. W. SOLOMON, A. M Auburn, Alabama. 

O. C. SPIGENER, A. B Prattville, Alabama. 

Rev. C. R. WILLIAMSON, A. M Mobile, Alabama. 

1873. 

J. L. GOLSON, A B . New Orleans, Louisiana. 

W. T. RUTLEDGE, A. B Crawford, Alabama, 

P. R. RUTLEDGE, A. B Crawford, Alabama. 

1874. 

B. K. FITZHUGH, B. S Augusta, Arkansas. 

*B. H. JOHNSON, B. E Montevsllo, Alabama. 

W. H. MOORE, A. B.. Auburn, Alabama. 

If. H. MOORE, A. B ....Piano, Texas. 

1875. 

FRANK a DILLARD, B S Sherman, Texas. 

WM. M. PERRY, B 8 Indian Territory. 

•JOHN A. RATCHFORD, B. S ^LaFayette, Alabama. 

EUGENE R. RIVER8,C. E Tallahassee. Florida. 

1876. 

Rev. M. K. CLEMENTS, B. S. A Guntersville, Alabama. 

C. T. HODGE, B. S. A Opelika, Alabama. 

a B HOLT, B. S. A .....Siluria, Alabama. 

E. M. OLIVER, A. B ... LaFayette, Alabama. 

F. D. PEABODY, B. S. A.. Columbus, Georgia. 

J. E. RUFFIN. B. S. A Rockford, Alabama. 

P. H. STOW, B. E , Phoenix, Arizona. 

REESE WILSON, B. S. A.. Waco, Texas. 

1877. 

Rev. SAMUEL C. RIDDLE, A. B Wills Point, Texas. 

CHARLES C. THACH, B. E Auburn, Alabama. 

JOHN M. TRAMMELL, B. E Chambers Co., Alabama. 

WILLIAM 0. TRAMMELL, B. E .„ Chambers Co., Alabama. 

1878. 

LEMUEL G. DAWSON, B. E Ware, Alabama. 

SILAS C. DOWDKLL, B. E , ..Point Coupe, Louisiana. 

TUCKER H. FRAZER, B. E... , Auburn, Alabama. 

ROBERT E HARDAWAY, C. E...... .... Mexico. 

GEORGE H. PRICE, B. E , M. S Nashville, Tennessee. 

•ISAAC A. LANIER, B. E .HuntsviUe, Alabama. 

LEE S. SCHIEFFELIN, B. E Nashville, Tennessee. 

REUBEN L. THORNTON, B. E ...Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 



. 



«■ 



Deceased. 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 7 

1879. 

MARK S. ANDREWS, A. B Terrell, Texas. 

WYATT H. BLAKE, B. 8 Blake's Ferry, Alabama. 

FRANK B. DILLARD, B. E Mobile, Alabama. 

JOSHUA S. DOWDELL, A. B , LaFayette, Alabama. 

OLIVER C. McGEHEE, B. S '. Eclectic, Alabama. , 

ALLEN B. O'HARA, B. E Sandtown, Georgia, 

THOMAS M. OLIVER, B S. A Opelka, Alabama, 

JOHN 0. PINCKARD, B. E...... .Dale county, Alabama. 

J. E. D. SHIPP, A. B... ......Cusseta, Georgia. 

1880. 

JOHNT. ASHCRAFT, B. E Brundidge, Alabama. 

♦BENJAMIN F. ATKINSON, A. B West Point, Georgia. 

SAMUEL B. CANTEY, B. E Fort Worth, Texas. 

SAMUEL CALLAWAY, B. E Snowdoun, Alabama. 

JOHN S. N. DAVIS, B. E Gold Hill, Alabama. 

ALVA FITZPATRICK, B. E Montgomery, Alabama. 

E. J. GARRISON, A. B Lineville, Alabama, 

GEORGE R. HALL, B. S. A..... ..Midway, Alabama. 

HARRISON L. MARTIN, A. B ....Abbeville, Alabama. 

CHARLES B. McCOY, B. S Opelika, Alabama. 

ROBERT F. OUSLEY, A. B ...Harpersville, Mississippi. 

HENRY G. PERRY, A. B..... Decaturville, Tennessee. 

EDGAR A. PRICE, B. S. A Nashville, Tennessee. 

GEORGE W. STEVENS, B. E.... Roanoke, Alabama. 

JABEZC. STREET, B. E : Atlanta, Georgia. 

ROBERT Y STREET, B. S Atlanta, Georgia. 

JAMES J. SYKES, B. S. A Courtland, Alabama. 

ROSSE. THOMAS, B. E Gadsden, Alabama. 

HOMER B. URQUHART, A. B....... Birmingham, Alabama. 

BARTOW L. WALKER, B. E Signal Service. 

1881. 

W. U. ACREE,B. S: Verbena, Alabama. 

J. CALLAWAY, B. A ....Snowdoun, Alabama. 

0. H. CRITTENDEN, B. E Mississippi. 

J. H. JETER, B. S. A Opelika, Alabama. 

J. G. JONES, B. S. A Montgomery county, Ala. 

W. H. LAMAR, Jr., B. A Signal Service. 

J. M. LANGHORNE, B. S. A Signal Service. 

J. T. LETCHER, B. E... Dadeville, Alabama. 

A. J. MITCHELL, B. E. Mobile, Alabama. 

0. N. OUSLEY, B. A Waxahatchie, Texas. 

B. B. ROSS, B. A Mexico. 

W. H. SIMMONS, B. A. Montgomery, Alabama. 

W. D. TAYLOR, B. E ..Mexico. 

J. D. TRAMMELL, B. E Mexico. 

E. I. VAN HO OSE,B.S M e **co. 

♦Deceased. 



/ 



*-~> 



— ^t) 



UtMi 



■" 



8 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

1882. 

E. N. BROWN, B. A Hurtsboro, Alabama. 

G. A. GARDEN, B. A • Colorado. 

A. M. CLEGG, B. M. E Columbus, Georgia. 

W. H. CUNNINGHAM, B. E Wood's Bluff, Alabama. 

BARTOW EBERHART, B. S. A Columbus, Georgia. 

B. H. FITZPATRICK, B. 8. A Montgomery, Alabama. 

J. M. HURT, B. E ..Geneva, Alabama. 

W. H. JONES, B. 8 „Union Springs, Alabama. 

HOWARD LAMAR, B. A Marianna, Florida. 

R. F. LIGON, Ja., B. E Tuskegee, Alabama. 

W. W. PEARSON, B. A Mobile, Alabama. 

J. M. RETD, B. E .Mexico. 



< 



Conferred Session 1882-'83. 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 

The four students of each class in the different departments, who secure 
the highest grades, are distinguished for excellence in scholarship, and are 
awarded Honor Certificates. 



ENGLISH. 

1. A. F. Whitfield, 

2. David Labkin, 

3. T. P. Zellars, 

4. J. T. McCrory. 

LATIN. 

1. J. C. Carmichael, 

2. David Larkin, 

3. R. L. Smith, 

4. A. A. Persons. 



FOURTH CLASS. 

MATHEMATICS. 

1. A. F. Whitfield, 

2. J. C. Carmichael, 

3. David Larkin, 

4. T. P. Zellars. 

FRENCH. 

1. A. F. Whitfield, 

2. T. P. Zellars. 

DRAWING. 

A. F. WHITFrELD. 



■*\ 



ENGLISH. 

1. R. H. Thach, 

2. J. C. Carmichael, 

3. W. H. Milton, 

4. E. M. Greene. 

LATIN. 

1. R. H. Thach, * 

2. C. H. Ross. 



CHEMISTRY. 

1. R. H. Thach, 

2. L. E. Cabtledge, 

3. C. H. Ross, 

4. W. H. Milton. 



THIRD GLASS. 

MATHEMATICS. 

1. R. H. Thach, 

2. W. H. Milton, 

3. R. L. Collier, 

4. F. C. Duke. 

GREEK. 

R. H. Thach. 

GERMAN. 

1. W. H. Milton, 

2. J. Allen. 

DRAWING. 

1. W. H. Milton, 

2. E. T. Glenn, Jr., 

3. R. L. Collier, 

4. C. H. Ross. 



4 i ■ 



10 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

SECOND CLASS. 
ENGLISH. . MATHEMATICS. 

1. W. L Here™**, 1- W. L. Hctohikson, 

2. C. D. Hubt, -'• W ; D - WoOD - 

3 J. M. LOCKHART, 

4 * B * H * B ° % L mN PHYSICS. 

1. J. M. Lockhart, 1 W.D.Wood, 

2 D Hurt 2 - w - L * Hutchinson, 

S. D. D. McLeod. 3. J. M. ^ HAB * __ 

NATURAL HISTOUY. CHEMIS1KY. 

1. W. L. Hutchinson, 1. ^ E- Cartledoe, 

2. W. D. Wood, ' 2 W. L. Hutchinson. 

3. Zell Gaston. 

ENGINEERING. DRAWING. 

1. W. D. Wood, . '. 1. W. D. Wood, 

2. ft. 8. Corey, 2. R. S. Corry. 

3. Zell Gaston, 

4. T. F..Hardin. TACTICS. 

1. W. L Hutchinson, 

2. J. B. Robinson, Jr., 

3. W. D. Wood. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. BACHELOR OF SCIENTIFIC AGRI 

T. F. Manoum, CULTURE. 

R. L. Sutton, j A. M. MoIntosh, 

W. H. Bruce, M. L. Harp, Jr. , 

N. P. D. Samford. D. B. Mangum. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING. 

E. M. Pace, W. S. Cox, 

A. L. Harlan. C. L, Gay, 

W. L. Ellis. 

CIVIL ENGINEERS. 
0. H. Crittenden, B. E. 
J. D. Trammell, B. E. 

HONORARY DEGREES. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 
Maj. E. R. Rivers, Principal Florida Western University Tallahassee, Fla. 

DOCTOR OF DIVINITY. 

Rev. R. B. Crawford Mobile, Ala. 

-Rev. Frederick Howard, Southwestern University Jackson, Tenn. 

Bbv. Henry Clay Morrison Louisville, Ky. 

DOCTOR OF LAWS. 

BuewellB Lewis, President University of Alabama ....Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Rev. I. T. Tichenor, D. D _ Atlanta> Ga 



IBIM^H^^^HMB 



Catalogue of Students 



FOR THE SESSION 1882- 1 83. 



ABBREVIATIONS. 

go Science. Ag • Agriculture. 

Lit™.'.'.'.'.'. Literature. Eng Engineering. 

gp 4 Q Special Course. 

Q en , c General Course for Students of Third and Fourth Classes. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Residence. Course. 

.' Mississippi Eng. 

Fitzpatrick, Benjamin Harrison.. . .'.Montgomery • • Eng. 

Trammell, J. D... Mexico ^ng. 



Name. 
Crittenden, O. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Bruce, William Hersehel Chambers county -tj*- 

Cox, Willie Stately ..Georgia "'vll' 

Ellis, Washington . LaFayette Autauga countg £ n K- 

Gay, Charles Linn. Montgomery county *•*%■ 

Harlan, Aaron LaFayette. . . ". • Tallapoosa county • • •*»■ 

Harp, Marcellus LaFayette, Jr Georgia • • • • '••«-• 

Mangum, Daniel Baker Pike county A K- 

Mangum, Theophilus Fields, Jr Pike county ^ • 

Mcintosh, Andrew Marcellus Tallapoosa county .Ag. 

Pace, Ernest Milton Oenma county 

Samford, Norris Preston Dowdell ....Lee county 

Sutton, Robert Lee , Lee county 

SECOND CLASS. 

Baldwin, Benjamin James. . .,' Montgomery county • • Eng. 

Boyd, Benjamin Hart well •* • • -Macon county f£ 

Boyd,LeRoy .Macon county.. -™- 

Corry, Robert Samuel Butler county Eng. 

Crittenden, Leon Frank. •• • Macon county • Eng. 

Fraser, Edward Webb Mobtie county Eng. 

Gaston, Zell Barbour county . . Eng. 

Gay, John Floyd Montgomery county , L,t. 



S 



Lit. 
Lit. 



U Afabatna Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Name. Residence. Course. 

Hardin, Tabor Fleming Lee county Eng. 

Hill, Malvern Erastus Georgia Lit. 

Hurt, Charles Davis Russell county Lit. 

Hutchinson, Washington LaFayette. . Georgia 8c. 

Killen, William John. Montgomery county Eng. 

Lancaster, Henry Joseph us Elmore county Lit. 

Lockhai t, John William Chambers county . Lit. 

Mangum, William Wightman Pike county Eng. 

McCarty, Thomas Rivers.. . . Russell county Lit. 

McLeod, Daniel Douglas Barbour county Lit. 

♦Redd, Marion Woodville Georgia Eng. 

Robinson, John Beverly, Jr Tennessee Sc. 

Sutton, Otis Malvin Lee county Lit. 

Urquhart, Richard Harris Barbour county Eng. 

Wood, William Daniel .Autauga county Eng. 

THIRD CLASS. 

Allen, James Montgomery county Gen. 0. 

Andrews, William Thomas Montgomery county Gen. 0. 

Barnes, John Rawles Lee county Gen. C. 

Cartledge, Lee Early , .Bullock county Sp. C. 

Collier, Robert Edward Lee Lee county Gen. C. 

Duke, Francis Columbus [... Georgia Gen. C. 

Glenn, Emory Thomas, Jr s Lee county Sp. C. 

Greene, James McKeene Lee county Gen. C. 

Griffin, Willie Scott Lee county Gen. C. 

Holley, A. W Henry county .Gen. C. 

Mclntyre, Erastus Stonume Conecuh county Gen. C. 

Milton, William Hall Florida Gen. C. 

Penn, Walton Thomas Chambers county • . . .Gen. C. 

Perry, Frank Howard Lee county Gen. C. 

Ross, Charles Hunter Lee county Gen. C. 

Royle, Edward Power Dallas county. Sp. C. 

Samford, William Hodges. .Lee county. Gen. C. 

Smith, James Clark Elmore county Gen. C. 

Stewart, William Weaver ....Lee county s p . c. 

Thach, Robert Henry Limestone county: Gen. C. 

^Trammell, Thomas Lee county Gen. C. 

Turner, Thomas Bryant Lee county .Gen! C. 

Williams, Daniel Bullard .Lee county ' Gen. c! 

FOURTH CLASS. 

Abraham, Edward Montgomery county..... Sec. A 

Allen, Zachariah Issiam Marengo county « a 

Allison, Gilmer Alexander Lee county ','"'" A 

Allison, Paul Elmore. ^ county. ........... \\\\\\ « A 

♦Deceased. ~~ * 



Vvr 



* 



/ 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 13 

Name. Residence. 

Armstrong, Henry Clay, Jr Macon county Sec. B 

Arnold, David Sterra Montgomery county " B 

Ashurst, James Henderson Tallapoosa county " A 

Askew, Wilburn Alexander Chambers county " B 

Autrey, Charles Mallary Georgia " A 

Bedell, Howard Album Lee county " B 

Bennet, Robert Love Lee county " A 

Blount, James Washington Florida " A 

Boykin, Robert Stafford Lee county " A 

Bradford, John Nunu Lee county " A 

Cade, Robert Lee Lee county. " B 

Capps, Luther Martin Henry county " A 

Carmichael, John Coleman Dallas county " A 

Carter, Julius Caesar Montgomery county " A 

Carter, John Tecumseh Montgomery county " B 

Carter, Robert Lee Montgomery county " A 

Crawford, Abednego Jackson .Lee county " B 

Crawford, William Henry Lee county " A 

Davis, William Easley Lee county . " A 

Dozier, Nathan Owen Tallapoosa county " A 

Drake, John Hodges, Jr Lee county " B 

Freeman, Henry Wynn Tallapoosa county " A 

Frizzle, William Clark Bullock county ...'.,. " B 

Gay, Edward Wright. Montgomery county " B 

Goodwyn, Robert Howell Montgomery county " A 

Goodwyn, Thomas Taylor. Montgomery county. . " A 

Grantham, Robert E. Lee..... . .Jackson county " B 

Harris, Eugene Willis Lee county " B 

Hightower, Edward Woodam Lee county " A 

Hoffman, Paul Mark Lee county. .. " A 

Hollingsworth, Edward *Tracey. . Etowah county " A 

Hopson, Robert Lee Florida . 

Hopson, Sidney Price • .Florida 

Lamar, George Holt Lee county 

Larkin, David Jackson county. |? A 

Lightfoot, Robert Edward Macon county. ... " A 

Lloyd, Edward Redd.... ±.....Lee county 

Long, Thomas Jefferson .Barbour county. ........... 

Mahone, Emmett Moore Georgia. "A 

McAuley, Sheridan Mobile.. 

McCrorey, James Thomas Georgia 

McPherson, Terrie McCall. . ; ■ . Lownde*eounty A 

Mitchell, Afton Hill Russell county B 

Mitchell, Tennent Lomax Bussell county 

Moody, Albert Henry Jackson county 

Pace, M. Downer Lee county . 



u 

it 
n 



ii 
it 

it 



it 
ii 



tt 
it 

M 

it 



B 
B 
B 



A 
A 



B 
A 



B 
A 
A 



14 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Name. Residence. 

Persons, Augustus Archilus Lee county 

Persons, James Turner Lee county 

Persons, Henry Stanford. Lee county. . . .. 

Reynolds, Bryant R Montgomery county 

Rundell, John Watson Lee county 

Babel, Alex. Montgomery county 

Samford, Thomas Drake Lee county 

Sauder, Albert Texas ..... 

Sauder, Oscar v . # g Texa8 .......'" 

Scott, Thomas Lee Chambers county ... . 

Schowalter, Mack Reynolds Mobile county . 

Shaver, Artemus Patterson Montgomery county. . 

Smith, Laurence Avery L ee county. . . . 

Smith, Robert Billups Leecounty... "" 

Sr^ H T ry ^as county...:::;:;;;;;' 

Whi field, Augustus Foscue Marengo county 

Williams, Elias Milton - m , 

wii- „ ilum Elmore county 

Wi hamson, Henry Pritchard Q e0 rgia. . 

Zellars, Thomas Peter . 0eorg ^ , ? .^T;;;,:.;^J 

RECAPITULATION 

First Claw 

Second Class .Z "" ..... 

Thirti Class ' .- 

*»"*»> Class ~ \ 

Poet Graduates ' " 

: 



Sec. A 
" A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
B 
B 
A 
A 
A 
B 
A 
A 
A 
A 
B 
A 



it 
tt 
tt 
it 

tt 

it 

it 

tt 

a 

a 

it 

a 

a 

a 

it 

a 

a 



Total. 



>••••••••* #a 



12 
23 
23 
69 
3 



.130 



> 



c~ 



» • 



f 



I 




3^2^, 



ANNOUNCEMENT, 



l883-'84. 




I 



p II ' HW ^p ■»- 



! 



Announcement for 1883-'84. 









FACULTY: 

Col. DAVID F. BOYD, 
President, and Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy \ 

J. T. DUNKLIN, A. M., LL. D., 

Professor of Latin Language. 

W. 0. STUBBS, A. M., 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M. ? 
Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, Jk., M. E., Ph. D., 

ProfesHor of Natural History. 

Rev. G. W. MAXSON, A. M., M. E., 
Professor of English Language and Literature. 

Gen. J. H. LANE, C. E., A. M., 
Professor of Civil and Mining Engineering. 

J. P. NEWMAN, 
Professor of Agriculture . and Director of the Experiment Station. 

Wm. LeROY BROUN, Jr., P. Sc, 
Assistant Professor Chemistry, 

C. C. THACH, B. E., 
Ifistructor in Languages. 

T. H. FRAZER, B. E. , 
Instructor, and Acting Commandant. 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D., 

Surgeon. 

W. C. STUBBS, 
Recording Secretary. 

P. H. MELL, Jb., 
Corresponding Secretary. 

E. T. GLENN, 
Librarian. 



Terms of Admission. 



Candidates for admission into the Fourth Class must be of good moral 
character and not less than fourteen years of age, and will be required to 
pass an approved examination in the following subjects: 

Enolish — Embracing Orthography, Grammar, Elements of Composi- 
tion, Geography, History of the United States. 

Mathematics — Embracing the whole of Arithmetic, including the 
Metric System; Elementary Algebra; Geometrical Drawing, as in Kitch- 
ener's Geometrical Note Book. 

Latin— Grammar (Allen & Greenough), Caesar (3 books), Virgil (3 
books of the JEneid). Optional. 

Entrance Examinations will be held on Monday and Tuesday preceding 
the opening in September, at which all applicants should be present. 

If, upon examination, an applicant should be found deficient in any of 
the required studies, he shall be assigned to a course of preliminary 
training in those branches; provided, that in no case will any applicant 
be admitted whose attainments in the English branches are not such 
that he may, with one year's training, be prepared for the studies of the 

Fourth Class. 

Students are advised to enter regularly some one of the prescribed 
courses, but they may, at the discretion of the Faculty, with the written 
approval of the parent or guardian, be assigned to selected studies; pro- 
vided, that in no case will a student be allowed to have less than twenty 
weekly recitations, and one of his studies must be Agriculture. 

Students, on their arrival at Auburn, must report immediately to the 
President, and present their testimonials and instructions. 

After having paid their fees to the Treasurer and matriculated, they 
will report to the Examining Committee, by whom they will be assigned 
to appropriate classes. The Commandant will furnish each student with 
a copy of the Regulations, and assign him to his proper section and 

company. • 

No student will be admitted to recitation in any class previous to, 

matriculation. 



zammmm iMMsslBB^BB™s«BasB^B"i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^"^MSB^^ 



Courses of Instruction. 



There are two regular Degree Courses in this Institution, designated 
as follows : 

I. 
COURSE IN AGRICULTURE AND CHEMISTRY. 

II. 

COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 

Each of these courses requires four years for its accomplishment, and 
entitles the student to the Degree of Bachelor of Science. For the first 
two years the studies in both Degree Courses are identical. Having 
completed the studies prescribed for these two years, the student may 
select either of the regular Degree Courses. 



GENERAL COURSE OF STUDY, 

FOR TWO YEARS, 

Preparatory to the Conr*e* in "Agriculture and 

Chemistry," and "Mechanics and Engineering." 

(Note.— The figures indicate the number of weekly recitations re- 
quired in the studies to which they are attached.) ( 

FOURTH CLASS. h 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 

3 English. 3 English. 

* History of United States. 2 History of United States. 

3 Freehand and Linear Drawing. 3 Freehand and Linear Drawing. 
♦5 Element'y Mechanics & Physics. *5 Botany. 
5 Mathematics. 5 Mathematics. 

♦8 Agriculture. *2 Agriculture. 

% Book-keeping. 2 Book-keeping. 

Daily Drill. Daily Drill. 

THlfcD CLASS. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 

5 English. 5 English. 

♦5 Mathematics. 5 Mathematics. 

♦5 Chemistry. *5 Chemistry. 

3 Drawing. 3 Drawing. 

*8 Agriculture. a Physiology. 

2 Book-keeping. 1 Book-keeping. 

Daily Drill. Daily Drill. 

•Practical instruction given in these studies in Field and Laboratories. 









Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



19 



I.— Course in Agriculture and Chemistry. 

The design of this Course is to furnish the student with a plan of study 
especially adapted to the wants of those who propose to devote them- 
selves to Agricultural or Chemical pursuits, both by practical training 
in Laboratories ajid on Farm, and by instruction in the principles of cor- 
rect husbandry, and in those sciences which relate to Chemistry and 
Agriculture. This course requires four years for its completion, em- 
bracing the two years' General Course and the following subjects: 

SECOND CLASS. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 

3 English. 3 English. 

*5 Mechanics and Physics. *5 Mechanics and Physics. 

*5 Analytical Chemistry. *5 Analytical Chemistry. 

*3 Agriculture. *3 Agriculture. 

*3 Systematic & Structural Botany. *3 Systematic and Structural Botany 
1 Tactics. 1 Tactics. 

Daily Work in Laboratories. Daily Work in Laboratories. 

Daily Drill. Daily Drill. 



1st Term. 

2 Logic. 

3 Astronomy. 
*3 Geology. 
*3 Zoology. 

*4 Agricultural Chemistry. 
♦2 Agriculture. 
*3 Analytical Chemistry. 

1 Tactics. 

Daily Work in Laboratories. 
Daily Drill. 



FIRST CLASS. 

2nd Term. 

2 Political Economy. 

3 Physical Geography. 
*3 Mineralogy. 
*3 Entomology. 
*4 Agricultural Chemistry. 
*2 Agriculture. 
*3 Analytical Chemistry. 

1 Tactics. 
Daily Work in Laboratories. 
Daily Drill. 



II.- Course in Mechanics and Engineering. 

This embraces the two years' General Course, and the following 

subjects: 

SECOND CLASS. 



1st Term. 
3 English. 

*5. Mechanics and Physics. 
5 Mathematics. 
*5 Engineering. 
3 Drawing. 
1 Tactics. 
Daily Drill. 



2nd Term. 
3 English. 

*5 Mechanics and Physics. 
5 Mathematics. 
*5 Engineering. 
3 Drawing. 
1 Tactics. 
Daily Drill. 



♦Practical instruction given in these studies in Field and Laboratories. 



20 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

FIKST CLASS. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 

2 Logic. 2 Political Economy. 

8 Astronomy. 3 Physical Geography. 

# 3 Geology. • *3 Mineralogy. 

8 Mathematics. *8 Mechanics. 

♦5 Engineering. *5 Engineering. 

5 Drawing. 5 Drawing. 

1 Tactics. 1 Tactics. 

Daily Drill. Daily Drill. 



Special Two Years' Course in Agriculture. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Mathematics First Term—:* Algebra. 

Second Term—h Geometry. 

Book-Keepino First Term — 2 Book-Keeping. 

Aobioultubb First and Second Terms— 2 Agriculture. 

Chemistry First and Second Terms— 5 Chemistry. 

Natural Science Fird and Second Terms— 5 Mechanics, Physics, and 

Botany. 
Drawing Second Term— 3 Drawing. 

SECOND YEAR. . ' , ^ 

Mathematics First and Second Terms— 2 Trigonometry and 5 Sur- 
veying. 

Agriculture First and Second Terms— 5 Agriculture. 

Chemistry First and Sec md Terms-i Agricultural Chemistry. 

Natural Philosophy . Firnt and Second Terms— 5 Physics. 

Natural History First Term-S Geology; 3 Zoology; 3 Botany. 

Second Term— 3 Mineralogy; 3 Entomology; 3 Botany. 



• 



Special Commercial Course. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Book-keeping Firnt and Second Terms- 3 Single Entry; Elements 

of Double Entry ; Farm, Mechanics, Eetail Mer- 
chant's Account; Balance Sheets; Statements; 
Bills; Receipts; Notes; Drafts; Exchange in 
Ordinary Business. 

Arithmetic First and Second Terms-* Common and Decimal 

Fractions ; Percentage ; Interest ; Discount ; Prac- 

ticu in short and rapid methods of Computation. 

♦Practical instruction given in these studies in Field and Laboratories. 







Alabama Agricultural arid Mechanical College. 21 

Algebra & Geometry. First and Second Terms— 5 According to student's 

advancement. 

English First and Second Terms— 5 History; Grammar; Com- 
position ; Practice in simple Business Forms and 
Correspondence. 

Penmanship First and Second Terms— 5 Penmansnip. 

Drawing First and Second Terms— 5 Drawing. 

Telegraphy First and Second Terms— 5 Hours' Practice. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Book-Keeping First and Second Terms— 5 Double Entry ; Wholesale, 

Shipping and Commission Business ; Banking, 
Railroad, <kc. ; Practice in Business Forms ; Ac- 
count Sales; Letters Credit; Bank Drafts; Ex- 
change ; Certified Checks ; Certificate of Deposit ; 
Forms of Endorsement, Ac. 

Mathematics First and Second Terms— 5 Plane Geometry, Plane 

Trigonometry, Town Surveying according to 
advancement. 

English First and Second Terms— 3 Rhetoric ; Composition; 

Business Correspondence ; Contracts, <feo. 

Commer'l Arithmetic. First and Second Terms— 8 Practice in Interest ; Dis- 
count; Storage; Closing Books ; Settling Partner- 
ship and Estates, &c. 

Penmanship First and Second Terms -Tr&ctice according to pro- 
ficiency. 

Telegraphy First and Second Terms-Five Hours' Practice. 

For those students who desire to pursue the studies of Latin, French 
and German, the following classes have been established: 

4 Classes in Latin. 
2 Classes in French. 
2 .Classes in German. 
To enter the lowest class in Latin the applicant must have a good 
knowledge of Latin Grammar, and have read three Books in Caesar, or 

its equivalent. 

French and German are begun here. 

These studies are not required in regular degree courses—but upon 
their completion, certificates of proficiency will be given in each. 

Moral and Mental Science are also optional, but will be taught when 

required. 

BTStudents of the Second Class of last year will be permitted to 
pursue their respective courses to graduation, the ensuing session. 



SPECIAL INFORMATION. 



tDepaj'trrieii ts of Trtstrviction. 



v 



• PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

The instruction is given by regular recitations from text-books, combined with lectures, illus- 
trated by experiments. The first part of the Course is occupied with Elementary Rational 
Mechanics, treated graphically, avoiding, as far as possible, complex mathematical symbols. 

This is followed by a full discussion of Molecular Mechanics. While due prominence is given 
to principles, constant reference is made to the Applications of Science. 

In the First Glass, the subjects studied are Astronomy and Mechanics. In the study of 
Mechanics in this class, Mathematical Analysis is used. 

Text-Books— Atkinson's Gahot, White's Astronomy, Peck's Mechanics. 



LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATUKE. 

PROFESSOR DUNKLIN. 
The subject taught in this Department is the Latin Language and Literature 
LATIN.-The modes of instruction are by translation from the Latin texte into English and 
vice vena, orally and in writing. ' 

A systematic course of exercises, illustrative of the principles of Latin Etymology and Syntax, 
are carried on, in connection with the reading of the authors prescribed 

^r^T°V b68t , Uden . ti8Vall,ed,,0t 8 ° mUCh by the aumber of ^oks read as by hi. 
ability to read Latin, and explain the principles of interpretation and construction 

-4~ ta i£^ and AntiquitiM of *° me ' M < iven in «— > wi * *• 

TEXT-BOOKS. 
Focbth OtAS8.-Cicero's Orations, Livy, Virgil, Composition, Mythology, Ancient Geoirranhv 
Thibd CL.ss.-Horace, Odes, Satires, Epistles, Composition ( JonVs), JLr^JoT 

GlTugh^ 
FiBflT CLA«.-Terance l Juvenal, Cicero de Oratore, Literature, Composition. 

BEFERENCE BOOKS. 

Classical Literature, Qinn & Heath's Classical Atlas. * * *""* Br ° Wn § 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

INBTBUOTOB THACH. 
Courses in German and French are given to such atnA* n * a «= 
tw.7«« for it. common. Like Jtin^!™ ™ «"",*"? ^ »*«•«*• 
time, » «., meet the convenience of £ ^enl ' ' ** "" * **- * ""* 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 28 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR STUBB8. ASSISTANT, PROFESSOR BROUN. 

There are three Courses in this Department— ' 

I. A General Course for all students. 
II. A Scientific Course. 
III. An Agricultural Course. 

I.— GBNERAL COURSE. 

Consists of a series of daily lectures and recitations in Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, fully 
illustrated by experiments. Chemical principles are thoroughly explained, together with their 
application to the various arts and industries. Special attention given to the Composition of 
Soils, Fertilizers, Metallic Ores and Technical Products. All the students of the Third Class 
pursue this Course. ' 

Text-Book. — Bloxam's Chemistry with Professor's Notes. 

II.-SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Students enter upon this Course after completing the General Course of the Third Class. The 
entire second year is devoted to Agricultural Analysis— the first half to Qualitative and the sec- 
ond half to Quantitative Analyses. 

The entire third year is devoted to Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses of Minerals, Ores, 
Waters, Ac. Having finished the General Course, the student is assigned to Work Table, with 
Gas and Water, the necessary reagents, Ac, and required to work at least two hours per day 
through the remaining years. * 

Text-Books.— Church's Laboratory Guide, Caldwell's Agricultural Analysis, Mott's Manual of 

Chemistry. 

III.— AGRICULTURAL COURSE. 

Consists of three years: 1st. General Chemistry. 2nd. Agricultural Analysis. 3rd. Agricul- 
tural Chemistry. 
The first and second years are the same as Scientific Course, and same text-books used. 
In the third year the students pursue Chemistry in its special application to Agriculture. 
Text-Books.— How Crops Grow (Johnson), How Crops Feed (Johnson). 



MATHEMATICS. 

PROFESSOR SMITH. 

The general course for the first two years embraces, the first year, Algebra and Geometry, six 
books; second year, Solid and Spherical Geometry, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Survey- 
ing, Mensuration, and Simple Railway Curves. 

Two objects are sought to be attained-lst. Mental discipline ; 2nd. A thorough knowledge of 

the practical application of principles. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given the Third Class, in Farm, Town and Government 
Land Surveying, Dividing Land, Mapping, Plotting and Computation of Areas; in Section, 
Cross-Section Leveling, Setting Slope Stakes, Computation of Earth Work; in Running out Sim- 
ple Curves ; also, in the Theory, Adjustment and use dTlnstrumente. 

The Class, in sections of six or eight, devote three afternoons a week, during the second term, 
to Field Practice, with Compass, Transit, Level, Chain and Rod. Maps, Plans and Profiles of 
Field Work are required in addition to regular work in Drawing. Mensuration includes an 
extended course in the Measurement of Heights and Distances, Plane, Rectilinear and Curvi- 
linear Figures, Surfaces and Volumes. Halstead's Metrical Geometry is made the basis of 

instruction in this subject. ; 

The completion of tfato Course, common to all students, lays the foundation for the Pure and 
Applied Mathematics of the Mechanical and Engineering Course, and qualifies those who dlscon- 
tinue the subject at this point to go into the field and -hop, and do good and useful work. 

Analytical Geometry and Calculus are pursued in the Engineering Course. 

Especial attention is given to their practical applications. Donng the enhre « our* instrno- 
tion in text-books is supplemented by lectures. 



24 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College, 

Solutions of original, practical problems are required of the student, to make him familiar 
with the application of principles, to test his knowledge, and make him self-reliant and-inde- 
pendent. 

N. B. — Special attention is called to imperfect preparation, for admission to the Fourth Class, 
in Arithmetic and Algel.ra. It is so common ps to prove a serious obstacle to progress in this 
Department. The importance of thorough preparation cannot well be overestimated. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 
Algebra, Went worth's Geometry, Olney's Trigonometry, Davies' Surveying, Halstead's 
Metrical Geomotry, Loom is' Analytical Geometry (new edition), Loomia' Calculus (new edition) 



NATURAL HISTORY. 

PBOFES80R MELL. 

Geology.— This subject is studied in the Fall Term of the last year. 

Special attention is given to the Geology of Alabama. The Connie is given by text-books and 
Lectures, illustrated by means of Diagrams, Maps and various Rocks, Fosailiferous and Non- 
Fossiliferous, to be found in the Geological Cabinet. Attention is given to the nature and origin 
of Ore deposits, Mineral Springs, and origin and Geological relations of Soils. 

MiNiRALOOY.-This topic is studied in the Spring Term of the last year. The Course is 

devoted to a general analysis of Crystallization, illustrated by Glass and Wood Models; and 

Blowpipe analysis of all the common Minerals that form the bases of our Soils. 

ZooLOOY,-Only those students pursuing the Agricultural Course are required to take this 
subject. 

A systematic arrangement of the Animal kingdom, in accordance with natural affinities, is 
made a special feature of the Cdnwe. 

J!iT. i0 "77 T ! ,ta " "•" " V " tU ° n " f the A e ricult «™l Course, and is taken up after the 

habim 2 t SS .£r rtiC " lHr " ,te " ,i0n " giVe " * lMee,s in J« ri "» 8 •» Vegetation, their 

habits, and the methods beet adapted for checking their ravages 

«nfr. , 7e™ Th0 A tU f T f ^ F ° Urth CU8S b9gin H,e 8tudy 0f Bo"" 1 * «■ °»»"°ue through- 
*lo wi h P, , * "* I™" " ""** " imP ° r,a " t fe!,tuK > of the <>»«■ The Cl.es is pro- 

nanl This work • „ ^^T^ **> & " d taUght h " w «° <>«termi„e their spific 
names. This work is sufficiently exhaustive to enable the student after .-ompletine the Course 
to name, unassisted, any of the ordinary Weeds and Grasses that h-, Hi ? iT^,' 

fields of this section. e Wl11 ""counter "> the old 

d.votedVZum.«:. It ^^ ^ Agriculture and Chemistry, three hour, per week are 

«f Lin... Construction of BattTri^ sJa'.Z T vlT T« ^ ereCti ° n "* maiDteDanCe 
pawd to take charge of offices. ^ completion of Course, they will be pre- 

TEXT-BOOKS. 
LeConte's Geology.-Daua's Geology, Dana's ManuRl ,,f mi ■ 

P,nt An.,,,,,, Chapmanl ^XS^^^'*^- »~ 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

„,. fc : PBOFE8SOB MAXBON. 

This Department embraces the following subjects • 
I. EN0LI8H.-The HUtory, grammatical structure ,„a 
Bhetoric, Composition, Elocution, History of English T r /^ ° f the Eag " 8h ^"^^ 
The study of Bhetoric and Composition Uc^^T^V 

continued throughout the first and second year* 



J 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 25 

and frequent written exercises required. Public exercises in Declamation are held on each 
Friday evening. Three original orations are required of each student of the First and Second 
Classes during the session. 

Monthly examinations are required of all students. The 8econd Glass study the History of 
English Literature, writing frequent biographical sketches of eminent authors, and criticisms 
on their works. 

II. History.— History of the United States, History of England. 

III. Logic and Political Economy — two recitations weekly throughout year. 

IV. Mental and Moral Science (optional) are taught to those students who may desire to pur- 
sue these branches. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Hart's English Grammar, Hart's First Lessons in Composition, Hart's Rhetoric and Composi- 
tion, Bussell's American Elocution, Holmes' History of the United States, Anderson's History 
of England, Shaw's New History of English Literature, Coppee's Elements of Logic, Hickok's 
Mental Science, Hickok's Moral Science, Walker's Science of Wealth. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

PROFESSOR LANE. 

The special studies in this Department begin in the Second Class, and are as follows: 

Second Class— Railroad Curves, Ordinates, Turnouts, Crossings, Leveling, Gradients, Setting 
Slope Stakes, Excavatious, Embankments and Railway Appliances. 

First Class— Building Materials, Strength of Materials, Strains, Mortars and Cements, 
Masonry, Foundations on Land and iu Water, Framing, Roofs, Arches, Bridges, Topographical 
Surveying, Common Roads, Pikes and Railroads, Canals, River and Sea Coast Improvements. 

Theory and practice are combined hi both classes. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Second CLASS.-Henck's Field Book, Gillespie's Roads and Railroads, Barry's Railway 

Appliances. 
First CLASS.-Maha i's Civil Engineering, and Allan's Strength of Beams under Transverse 

Loads (or their equivalent), with Lectures. 

BOOKS OF REFERENCE. 
Rankin's Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Stoney on Strains, Wood's Roofs and Bridges, 
Merrill on Bridges," Vose's Manual for Railroad Engineers. 



DRAWING. 

Drawing, in the Third and Fourth Chases, is obligatory on the students of both Courses. In 
the First and Second Classes, only the students in Mechanics and Engineering are required to 

The Fourth Class students practice Linear and Free Hand Drawing. In the Tiiird Class the 
elemenUry principles of Orthographic and Isometrical Projections, Shades and Shadows, and 

Model Drawing, are taught. 

In the Second Class, the instruction embraces Orthographic Projections, Isometric Drawing, 
Shades and Shadows, Tinting in India Ink and Colors, Sketches of Tools and Machines, Plans, 
Elevations and Cross Sections of Buildings, and Perspective. 

The First Class are taught Perspective and Topographical Drawing. They also make Dew- 
ing, of Machines, Roofs, Bridges, Ac. Plans, Profiles and Sections of ta.bt»d Surveys complete 

the instruction in this Department. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Fourth CLA8S.-Davia>n's Linear Drawing, White's Art Studies. 

Third Class.— Davidson's Projection and Model Drawing. 

Second Class— Minifie's Mechanical Drawing. 

First CLASS.-Mahan's Industrial Drawing, Smith's Linear Perspective. 

BOOKS OF REFERENCE. 
Smith A Enthoffer's Topography, Warren's Machine Drawing, rhurch's Descriptive Geometry 
and Shades and Shadows, Mahan's Stereotomy. 



r\ 



I 



f 



26 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

AGRICULTURE. 

PB0FE880B J. 8. NEWMAN. 

There are two Courses in Agriculture, oue extending through four years, embracing a liberal 
education for any of the practical pursuits of life, together with thorough instruction in those 
sciences which underlie Agriculture. In this Course Laboratory work, in Analyses of Soils, 
Fertilisers, Feedstuff's, Ac, constitute an important feature. The first two years of this Course 
are devoted to studies common to both The third year is occupied in this Department with 
Farm Management, Soils and Manures, Care of Stock, Growing of Crops, Anim'al Physiology, 
and Cattle Feediug. 

The fourth year is devoted to Vegetable Physiology, Field Crops, Orchards and Gardens, and 
Landscape Gardening. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

« 

Allen Farm Book, Jurvis' Physiology, Armsby's Cattle Feoding, Olemen's Truck Farming for 
the South, Barry's Fruit Culture, Henderson's Gardening for Profit, Kemp's Landscape 
Gardening. t 

SHORT COUKSE IN AGRICULTURE. 
This Course extends over two years, and dispenses with much of the preliminary instruction 
of the first two years, common to both Courses. It also abridges the Laboratory work. This 
Course is intended to meet the wants of a largo number of young men who propose to devote 
themselves to Agricultural pursuits and have neither time nor means to take the regular Course. 
Thorough instruction in practical Agriculture is given. The study of all the sciences relating 
to Agriculture receive same attention as in General Course. Mathematics pursued through 
Surveying, thus enabling the student not only to survey his land, but by knowledge of Leveling, 
to construct terraces and ditches. In short, this Course embraces all the technical studies of the 
General Course. 

On its completion a student is given a Certificate of Proficiency in Agriculture, and such a 
certificate makes him an Alumnus of this Institution. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Z\. T m ^. 1°"' " " C " ref " 1 "*■*"""»"« 8 "»" be »»* in Scientific Agriculture, 

ZL„, a'h ,; g V r :!! h "" ° ,h ' r nWde " iu '"'™«'>». °»»» be furnished the Commit 
-loner of Agriculture for publication in hie monthly bulletins and annual reports » 

Under thi. act the T. ueteee, at their last meeting, organized " The Experiment Station » by 
purchasing addition., ,.„„. and buildings, and .pointing Mr. J. S. *JL£7££Xl 

active »ork wll be begun at once. Beeraes the large number of experiments now under trial 

The e.,riu7 h« the d r rtmeD, r il 0f -*™" 1 "- *»' - carefu.ly and systematica"? m" 
ItlT, 1 7, experiment, will be published monthly in bulletins by Commissioner of 

SctZe^tbur: :T ^ fflCe8 ' t0 ,he DiWtOT * »' 8 *«*- -Commiseioner It 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

OM, BOYD, PBK8IKENT. ' IN8TBDCTOB FBAZEH, COMMANDANT. 

Military Science and Tactics are required to be tau«rh. in ♦».;* t «** ^ 
i. mlthrelly carried out, by imparting to ££ X, n , ni ITX * *? ^ ^ 

«■», precticl inaction in theSchool of Zsolter " f the <* ' ^^ * "•" 
also, in Gu^i Mounting, In^eCion* DrJp^H^ ^T'^ " ,** ^^t^' 
the SUU, with breeching Cmet murtet, *L ^d Znteme^U ^ " ^^ * 
The following uniform ha. been preM rib«l for .dress, viz.: Stack ^ of We8t Polnt Cadet 
grey; grey pwits, vert and cp; trimmings block A verv ,.»«. a 7. 

~r, ug. umca. a lery neat and serviceable dress suit can 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 27 

be obtained here at about $16. This fa, less expensive th-n the usual clothing. All student* are 
required to wear this uniform at all times duiiiiK the term. 

The Drill* are short, and the military duty involves no hardship. The Military Drill is a 
health-giving exercise, and its good effects in the development of the phyrique and improvement 
of the carriage of the Cadet are manifest. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. The officers are selected for proficiency 
in drill, deportment aud studies. Each company is officered by one Captain, one 1st Lieutenant, 
and one 'Jnd Lieutenant, with a proper number of Sergeunt* and Corporals. The officers and 
non-commissioned officers are distinguished by appropriate insignia of rank. These appoint- 
ments are conferred by the Faculty, on nomination of the Commandant, and are continuous 
unless forfeited by absence or misconduct. 

No military duty is required of the privates of the First Class, except to Drill with the 
Battalion. 

The First and Second Classes rerfte once a week in Military Tactics. 



POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 

There are two Post-Graduate Degrees — 

MASTER OF SCIKNCE. 
CIVIL ENGINEER. 

Any graduate of this College, who shall, after graduation, actively 
engage, for at least three yt* ars, in literary or scientific work in the line 
of his profession, and who may, by an examination prescribed by the 
Faculty, give satisfactory evidence of sufficient advancement, shall be 
entitled to a Post-Graduate Degree. The requisite course of study and 
the nature of the examination may be obtained by correspondence with 

the Faculty. 

Applicants for Post-Graduate Degrees must matriculate and deposit 
wfth the Treasurer the amounts of their Diploma fees. They shall also 
write and present te> the Faculty satisfactory theses upon some subject 
pertaining to their professions. 

Resident graduates may prosecute the studies in any Department of 
the College without payment of regular fees. 



CERTIFICATES of PROFICIENCY and DISTINCTION. 

CERTIFICATES OF PROFICIENCY 

Will be awarded to those students who -satisfactorily complete the two 
years' Agricultural or Commercial Course. 

CERTIFICATES OF DISTINCTION 

Will be awarded to the first four students in the different subjects of each 
class, provided their grade is above 90 per cent., and they have satisfac- 
torily passed all the regular examinations^ of that session. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are kept by the 
officers of instruction, in a form adapted to permanent preservation. 

From this record a circular or statement is sent to the parent or guar- 
dian quarterly. 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

At the end of each term there shall be written or oral examinations, or 
both, on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations shall only be held by order of the Faculty. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examinations, 
can be promoted to the next higher class only on satisfactory examina- 
tions at the opening of next session. 

It is particularly required that every student who enters the College 
shall remain through the examinations at the end of the term.. Leaves 
of absence andtionorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted within 
six weeks of the Examination, except in extreme cases. 

At stated intervals during the year, all students, except those of the 
First Class, are required to stand written examinations on Geography 

and English. 
Examinations for Degrees or Certificates of Proliciency embrace, in 

their scope, the entire subject of study in the Course. 

MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. 

Many valuable additions have been made to the various branches of this Museum within the 

past few years. 
Contributions have been received from different States of the Union, from England, Italy, 

France and the Bermuda Islands 

The Geology of Alabama is well illustrated with minerals, fossiliferoiis and non-fossiliferous 
rocks from the different formations of the State. The Museum is divided into the following 
departments: Mineralogies!, Conchological, Geological, Zoological and Botanical. Kach depart- 
ment is systematically arranged and catalogued for study and display. 

The entire collection of the Museum, added to the private Cabinet belonging to the Professor 
oY Natural History, numbers more than 20,000 specimens. # 



MUSEUM OF MECHANIC ARTS. 

Some progress has be»n made in establishing a Museum of Mechanic Arts. Already there has 
been collected a number of the products of manufacture, giving excellent illustrations of various 
branches of industry. It is proposed to make this au important feature in the College, by exhib- 
iting, as far as possible, the various processes and products of manufacture. 



MUSEUM OF AGRICULTURE. 

The Agricultural Museum is intended to illustrate, as far as possible, the agricultural products 
of this and other countries. It now contains nearly 1,000 specimens, obtained by donations and 
by a system of exchanges with other Agricultural Colleges, illustrating. varieties of Soil, Cotton* 
Wheat, Oats, Corn, Peas, Grasses, Ac. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The Ohdmical Laboratory is admirably fitted up for work in analysis. It consists of a Lecture 
Boom,. furnished with counters, pneumatic trough,, gasometer and large glass case; a Work 
Boom, with twenty-five tables; a Furnace Room, and a Balance Boom. All are supplied with 
gas and water. Every student pursuing Analytical Chemistry is provided with a separate work 
table, the necessary chemicals and apparatus, a jet of gas with Bunsen's burners, andenameled 
water sinks. In the Balance Room are balances made by Oertling, of London, and Becker, of 
New York. An annual fee of $10 is paid by students in the Courses of Agriculture and Science 
for the use of Chemicals in the Laboratory. 



/ 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 2» 

. LIBRARY. 

A room in the College builling is appropriated to the Library, but the number of books at 
present is not large. A portion of the recent appropriation made by the State Legislature will 
be used in the purchase bf books. For this purpose there is also paid a small annual fee by each 
student. 

The Library is open at stated times, when students are permitted to select tooks according to 
regulations prescribed by the Faculty. 



DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the President and 
Faculty, in accordance with the Code of Laws and Regulations enacted 
by the Trustees, and furnished to each student upon matriculation. 

The strictest attention to study, and the most exact punctuality in 
attendance on recitations, and all other duties, will be made the condition 
of every student's continuance at the College. 

Students are prohibited from having in their possession weapons or 
arms not issued for the performance of military duty. 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES. . 

Religious services are held every morning in the Chapel. 

The students are required to attend these exercises, and also to attend 
the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. Opportunities are 
also offered for attending Bible Classes every Sunday. 



LOCATION AND BUILDING. 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, sixty miles from Mont- 
gomery, directly on the line of the Western Railroad. 

The region is high and healthful— 821 feet above tide water. 

The College building is an excellent brick edifice, with four stories, 
containing, in all, thirty-eight rooms, including two well furnished 
society halls, lecture rooms and offices, with Chemical Laboratory, Cab- 
inets and Agricultural Museum. 

By statute of the State, the sale of spirituous liquors and keeping of 
gaming saloons of every kind, within five miles of Auburn, are forbidden. 

APPROPRIATIONS BY THE STATE LEGISLATURE. 

The last Legislature of the State appropriated the sum of $30,000 to 
this College, to be expended in buildings, repairs, the purchase of appa- 
ratus for the scientific departments, &c. Also, for the purpose of estab- 
lishing an Experimental Station, to conduct experiments and illustrate 
improved methods in agriculture, and to have such chemical analyses of 
commercial fertilizers made as may be required, there was appropriated 
to this College a portion of the amount accruing from the special tax on 
all fertilizers sold in the State. 




PT" 



=== 



30 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



The Department of Agriculture, recently established, is by law located 
at Auburn. The office of the Commissioner will be in the College 
building. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two Literary Societies— the Wirt ami Websterian— connected 
with the College. These Societies, by order of the Board of Trustees, 
hold their meetings each Saturday morning during the session. Each 
has a commodious hall, handsomely fitted up, a library of standard and 
miscellaneous works, and a reading room. Their weekly exercises add 
to the facilities afforded by the College for practice in composition, elocu- 
tion and discussion. 

These Societies hold celt- brations on the evenings of Thanksgiving Day 
and the 22nd of February, and also on Monday and Tuesday evenings 
during Commencement week. They elect, annually, with the approval 
of the Faculty, an orator to represent them at the close of the year. 



ARBOR DAY. 

The 22nd of February is designated, by order of $ho Trustees, Arbor 
Day, It is a holiday, on which students are encouraged, with ceremonial 
celebrations, to take part in planting trees on the College grounds. 



SOCIETY OF ALUMNI. 

The annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the Society, is delivered 
in the Chapel, Wednesday afternoon of Commencement week. T. J. 
Lamar, President; C. C. Thach, Treasurer and Secretary; C. C. Thach, 
Orator for 1883. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association comprises the students who are members of churches. 
Its object is to promote the religious character and usefulness of those 
connected with it. Weekly meetings are held, and public addresses occa- 
sionally delivered. A. M. Mcintosh, President; and J. C. Carmichael, 
Secretary. 



BOARDING. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, will not be permitted 
to make changes without obtaining permission of the Faculty, having 
liret given two weeks' notice. 

The Faculty will feel authorized to remove f students from boarding- 
houses when it becomes manifest that they are failing in their duties 
from improper associations, or for any other reason requh ing such 
removal. 




Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 31 

EXPENSES. 

TUITION FKEE TO ALL CADETS, IN OR OUT OP THE STATE. 

Incidental fee, per term, in advance $j 50 

Library fee !....!.!....!. 2 00 

Surgeon's fee '[ 2 50 

Board, in private families, per month . . $12 to 15 00 

Diploma fee, upon graduation 5 00 

1 1 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

The Faculty earnestly request parents and guardians to deposit with 
the Treasurer of the College all funds designed for sons or wards, 
whether for regular charges of College fees and board, or any other pur- 
pose. It is the duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed in his , 
hands, and to pay for all expenses incurred by students, including board, 
uniform, books, &c, only when approved by the President. A monthly 
statement of the receipts and expenditures will be forwarded to parents 
and guardians. The Faculty cannot control expenses of students, and 
should not be considered responsible for them unless parents conform to 
this rule. 



ACADEMIC YEAR 

The Academic Year, which is divided into two equal terms, commences 
on the last Wednesday in September, and ends on the last Wednesday in 
June following, which is Commencement day. The second term begins 
on the second Wednesday in February. 

IWNo intermission at Christmas, except for one day ; and parents are 
earnestly requested not to grant their sons permission to go home at that 
season, except in cases of pressing importance, as their absence seriously 
disarranges the exercises of the classes, and is very disadvantageous to 
the young men themselves. 



CONTKIBUTIONS TO THE MUSEUM. 

The following persons have made valuable additions to the various branches of the Museum: 
Dr. I. T. Tichenor, Mrs. J. S. Dill, Miss Kuss, Mrs. W. C. Stubbs, J. M. Blount, Mrs. Douglas 

C M. Awtry, Otis Smith, Mrs. J. T. Dunklin, M. E. Hill, Prof. W. C. Stubbs Mn> Howell, Prof. 

G. W. Maxson, Mn. Maxson, K W. Fraser. R. L. Bennett, Dr. R. Persons, D B Mangum M,s. 

Tnunmell, H. S. Petaons, Mrs. Lipscomb, F. M. Reese, J. Rundel, Rev. B. £ R.ley M.ss M Re e, 

Mrs. O. D. Smith, Jimmie Mason, V. Frankfurter, J. T. Trammel!, Mn, Boyk.n ,*• ™««". 

Frank Frazer, Howard Lamar, Rev. W. M. Blackwelder, J. Persons Bryant C. Harvey, J. N. 

Bradford, Prof. O. Thach, Mrs. W. B. Frazer, A. M. Mcintosh, J. T. McCrorey. 
The following persons have contributed by exchanging with the Museum: 
W. M. Crowfoot Beccles, Suffolk, England; Miss Annie M. Penmston, >«-^*™"*; ££ 

Johnson, Grand Rapids, Michigan ; Mrs. James Schuyler, Half Moon, San Mat* .count, ,,CaH- 

fornia ; John W. Hood, S»n Fnmcisco, California; J. T. Romine, Harveysburg, Oh.o Prtf. F. Z. 

Harvey, Indns.rial University, Arkansas; Miss Sarah P. Monks, Cold Springs, New York , F. B. 

Monteverde, San Francisco, New York. 

3 




\ 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 

The Board of Trustees, at their recent meeting in June r 
having decided to devote their attention hereafter almost 
exclusively to the leading object of this College, viz.: to 
teach those branches "of learning pertaining to Agriculture 
and the Mechanic Arts, the public are respectfully informed 
that the Courses of Study have been remodeled to better 
carry out that idea. 

The aim of the Institution now is, to give a good scientific 
and industrial education. A special Professor of Agriculture 
has been added to the Faculty; the State Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station has been established at the College, and the 
Legislature has recently made liberal appropriations to better 
fit up the Farm, and supply Scientific Apparatus, Books, &c. 
Besides, the State Commissioner of Agriculture has bis- 
office here. 

In this day of the telegraph and telephone, the steamship 
and lightning express, the world moves briskly in thought 
and action; and education, to be useful, must be scientific and 
practical. 

A new departure has been taken. The College is now in 
full sympathy with the purpose for which it was founded by 
Federal and State law: to give a liberal education to the 
industrial classes. It is a real Scientific and Industrial School 
As such, it desires the confidence and support of the people 
of Alabama, and respectfully asks their patronage. 

DAVID F- BOYD, President* 

Auburn, Ala., July 23, 1883. 



,GAYLAMOUNT 

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Manufactured by 

GAYLORDBRCS. Inc. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Stockton, Ca'if. 



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Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



1883 



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OCLC: 36819601 
Entered: 19970429 



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Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama *h [microform] 1 

► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 

► 10 246 10 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Auburn, Alabama I 

► 11 246 10 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama f 

► 12 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama f 

Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, 1 

21 v. ; *c 21 cm. 1 

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► 23 78500 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
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07 THE 



State Agricultural and Mechanical College 



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18S3-'34. 



AND 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



1 83 '+-'85 

V 






Board of Trustees, 

AND 

TIME OF EXPIRATION OF OFFICE. 



His Excellency, E. A. O'NEAL, 
Governor of Alabama, ex officio President. 

Hon. H. C. ARMSTRONG, 

Superintendent of Education, ex officio. 



FIRST DISTRICT: 

Hon. C. C. LANGDON, Mobile. 
February 28, 1887. 

, SECOND DISTRICT: 

J. W. HARDIE, Esq., Montgomery. 
January 4, 1885. 

THIRD DISTRICT: 
Hon. W. H. BARNES, Opelika. 
Hon. H. D. CLAYTON, Clayton. 

February 28, 1887. 

FOURTH DISTRICT: 

Hon, JONATHAN HARALSON, Selma. 

January 4, 1889. 

FIFTH DISTRICT: 

Hon. R. F. LIGON, Tuskegee. 
January 4, 1889. 

SIXTH DISTRICT: 

Hon. JOHN W. BISHOP, Talladega. 
January 4, 1889. 

SEVENTH DISTRICT: 

Hon. M. L. STA^SEL, Carrollton. 
January 4, 1885. 

EIGHTH DISTRICT: 

Hon. J. N. MALONE, Athens. 
January 4, 1885. 



E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. 

F. M. REESE, Secretary. 



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FACULTY* 

Coi« DAVID F. BOYt), 

President, and Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astrowmy. 

J. T. DUNKLIN, A. M., LL. D., 

Professor of Latin Language. 

W. C. 8TUBBS, A. M., 

Profesmr of General and Agricultural Chemistry. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, Jr., M. E.,Ph. D., 

Professor of Natural History. 

Rev. G. W. MAXSON. A. M.. M. E., 

Professor of English Language and Literature. 

Obn. J. H. LANE, C. E., A. M., 
Professor of Civil and Mining Engineering. 

J. S. NEWMAN, 

Professor of Agriculture, and Director of the Experiment Station. 

LeROY BROUN, JR., B. SC., 
Assistant Professor Chemistry. 

C. C. THACH, B. E., 
Instructor in Languages. 

T. H. FRAZER, B. E., 
Instructor, and Acting Commandant 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D„ 
Surgeon. 

C. C. THACH, 
Recording Secretary. 

P. H. MELL, Jr„ 
Corresponding Secretary. 



E. T. GLENN, 

Librarian. 



211849 



A 



Military Organization, 

C>l. D. F.BOYD, Pre dbui. 

.M.v j. T. II. FRAZER, Gmm mlaiit. 

J. H DRAKE, M. D, Surgevi. 



GM9ET OFFICERS. 



Staff. 



P. C DUKE, AtljtkhU. 
DAVELARKLY, Cdor Septal. 

Company A. 

Gapt'im, W. L. Hutchinson. 
1** Lki«i, W. D. Wood. 
2<i Lint, T. F. Hardin. 
\*t Sergt., R. E. L. Colhek. 
U Sergt., W. T. Pen*. 
M Ssryf., A. P. Whitfield 
1st Corp., 0. L. Newman. 



R. H. THACH, Sergeant Major* 
I. i\ ZELLARS, Ordnance Sergeant. 



Gemptif i. 



Otptahi J, 
1*£ Lieut., 
-id Lieut., 
14 Sergt., 
21 Sercjt., 
3- J Ser<jt., 
1st C>rp., 



B. Robinson, Jr. 
B. H. Boyd. 

J. W. LiOCKHART. 

J. M. Allen. 
E. S. McIntyre. 
L. F. Howell. 
8. C. Pitts. 



Company 6, 



Captain 11. 8. Corry. 
ltf Iwea*., D. D. McLeod. 
2d Z^td. , £. R. Boyd. 
1st Sergt. , Thos. Trammell. 
2d Sergt., W. T. Andrews. 
3d Sergt. , B. S. Burton. 
1«* 0>rp., L. W. Spratling. 



ALUMNI. 



18G0. 

RKV. W. *\ GLENN itianto n^^i„ 

F. S. JOHNSON ... A2S?J ^vSS22i n - 

R.D.LPM8DEN HI ■"^^^SE? , n««i- 

A. F. WOOLE\ ; Kington, Georgia. 

1861. 
KW 81 Sparta, Gem**. 

R.P. McFVRLAN ^1 ZZZ: i iJSSiS > Garcia. 

f'A/fc • • Greenville. Georgia. 

.i.J. K KCKrhRb Perote. Alabama. 

1867. 

Wrwi^SwAMfTT T,aFayeite. Alabama. 

HOWARD HAMILL Jacksonville, Illinois 

1868. 

^w A An/i ' ' Wnnfmamm'. Alabama. 

Rk\. \Y. T. PATILLO M i...Lineville, Alabama. 

1800. 

Q&iS&^^invWft ' Louisville. Alabama. 

LKANDRR O. JACKPON Longview. Texas 

7>\ i *™ A &&2&'x;v ' • • Auburn, Alabama. 

^J^SJbFEf^ Mobile, Ab.bama. 

J. R. MOTLF>.., ># > Tnskeirce Alabama 

JAMEP D. MVRICK ! .S^ 

R. C. PERSONS Cnitcd' States Navy. 

The classes of 18fi0, 1881, 18C»7, 1SG8, 1809 graduated f.n the East Alabama College. 

1872. 

R. E. RT T RT. A. M ?,ilom. Alabama. 

R. O. ROUNPAVALL, A. M Huntsville. Texas. 

W. E. JIORNE,0. K 4.Tamp«. Florida. 

L. V. ROPPER. A. B ,„ Colorado. 

Rev. E. AV. POT.OMON. A. M , ...Auburn. Alabama. 

G. C. PPIGFNTO. A. B Prattvillo. Alabama. 

Rev. C. R. WILLIAMSON, A. M GlcnVllle, Alabnma. 

1873, 

J. L GOLPON. A. B ; .New Orleans, Louisiana. 

W. T. RFTTEDGE. A. B • ...Crawford. Alabama. 

P. R. RUTLEDOE, A. B .....Crawford, Alabama. 

1874. 

R. K. FJTZHrOH. B. P ..Augusts. Arkansas. 

°B. H. JOHNPON. B. E Montcvaljo, Alabama. 

W. H. MOORE. A. B .'...Auburn. Alatwma. 

M. H. MOORE. A. B „ :.. ....Plnno, Texas, 

1875. 

FRANK C. PILLARD, B. P . ..,*■]•« r»:- n. 5Vw. 

nVM. M. PERRY. B. P .ColUn bos, Otfrpf* 

*.TOnN A. RATCHFORD. B. P JrFavctte; AlnU xra. 

EUGENE R. RJVERP. C. E ;. ...TalMfmrc*. FlfiMr. 



\ * 



^Deceased. 



'■ 



(! 



Alabama Agricultural ami Mrclwnieal College. 

187<>. 



* « 



Collhisville, Alabama. 
Opelika, 
Siluria 
LaFayeltc 
Columbus, Georgia. 
Rockford, Alabama. 
Opelika, Alabama. 
Centre, Texas. 



UIkv. M. K. CLEMENTS. B. S. A. 
C. T. HODGE, B. 8. A. 
S. B. HOLT, B. S. A.. 

E. M. OLIVEH, A. B. 

F. I). PEABODY, B. S. A. 
I. E. IUTFIN, B. S. A. 
['. H. STOW, B. E 

feEESE WILSON, B. S. A. 

1877. 
Rev. SAMUEL C. RIDDLE, A. B„ : Wills Point, Texas. 
CHARLES C. THACU, B.E.. Aulmm, Alabama. 

JOHN M. TRAMMELL, B. E. Chambers County, Ala. 

WILLIAM O. TRAMMELL, B. E.. Chambers .County, " 

j - ■ 1878. 

LEMUEL G. DAWSON, B. E.... Ware, Alabama. 

SILAS C. DOWDELL, B. E... .Point Coupe, Louisiana. 

ijTUCKER H. FRAZER, B. E.... Auburn, Alabama: 

ROBERT E. HARDAWAY, C. E. Tuscaloosa, 

feEORGE H. PRICE, B. E., M. S. Nashville, Tennessee. 

ISAAC A. LANIER, B. E. Huntsville, Alabama. 

LEE S. SCHIEFFELIN, B. E.. Nasliville, Tennessee. 

.'REUBEN L. THORNTON, B. E. Tuscaloo- a, Alabama. 

1879. 
MARK S. ANDREWS, A. B.. 



WYATT H. BLAKE, B. S.. 
FRANK B. DILLARD, B. E.. 

OSHUA S. DOWDELL, A. B.. 

LIVER C. MfcGEHEE, B. S. 
ALLEN B. O'HARA, B. E. 
ITHOMAS M. OLIVER, B. S. A.. 
JOHN O. PINCKARD, B. E.. 




i t 
n 



Greenville, Texas. 
Blakes* Ferry, Alabama. 
Whistler 
LaFayette 
Eclectic 

Santltown, Georgia. 
Opelika, Alabama. 
Clayluvlehee, " 
IJ. E. D. SHIPP, A. B... Cussela, Georgia. 

IS 1880. ' . 

ji.IOHN T. ASHCRAFT, B. E. Bruiulige, Alabama. 

pBENJAMIN F. ATKINSON, A. B. West Point, Georgia. 

I ,; : S A M UEL B. C ANTEY, B. E. Fort Mitchell, Alabama. 

SAMUEL CALLAWAY, P.. E Montgomery 

OHN S. N. DAVIS, B. E. Gold Hill 

ALVA FITZPATRICK, B. E. , Montgomery 

E. J. GARRISON, A. B. Lineville 



GEORGE R. HALL, B. S. A. 

ARRISON L. MARTIN, A. B. 
KHARLESB. McCOY, B. S. 
ROBERT F. OUSLEY, A. B.. 
IENRY G. PERRY. A, B. 
ODGAR A PRICE, B. S. A. 
IGEORGE W. STEVENS, B. E.. 
JJABEZ C. STREET, B. E.. 
ROBERT Y. STREET, B. &T. 



a 
a 

i i 
a 

a 



oolSS 



Midway 
Elba 
Opelika 
Harpersville, 
Auburn, Alabama. 
Nashville, Tennessee. 
Roanoke, Alabama. 
Bluff's Springs, " 
Atlanta, Georgia. 



ippi. 



\t 



JAMES J. SYKES, B. S. A, Courtlatid, Alabama. 



♦Deceased. 




1 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical ('alley. 



ROSS E THOMAS, B. E. 

HOMER B. URQUHART, A. B. 
BARTOW L. WALKER, B. E. 



W. U. ACREE.B. 8.. 

J. CALLAWAY, B. .4... 

(). H. CRITTENDEN, C. E... 

J. H. JETER, B. S. A. 

J. G. JONES, B. 8. A. 

W. H. LAMAR, Jr., B. A.. 

J. M. LANGHORNE, B. 8. A. 

J. T. LETCHER, B. E... 



1 88 1 . 



Gadsden, Alabama. 
Birmingham " 
Signal Service. 



Verbena, Alabama. 

Montgomery, " 
Baton Rouse, Louisiana. 
Opelika, Alabama. 
Barachias, '' 
Washington, D. C. 
Philadelphia, Penn. 
Texas. 



A. J- MPfCHELL, B. E. Cedar Keys, Florida. 
C. N. OUSLEY, B. A. Waxahatchie, Texas. 

B. B. ROSS, B. A. Auburn, Alabama. 
W. H. SIMMONS, B. A. Newton, 

W. D. TAYLOR, B. E... Eclectic, 

J. D. TRAMMELL, B. E.... , Cbluiabns, Georgia. 

E. I. VAN HOOSE, B. S. Mexico. 

1882. 
E N BROWN, B A Union Springs, .-Bahama, 

G A CARDEN, Bi ...Z Colorado 

A M CLEGG, B M E Memphis, Tennessee 

W H CUNNINGHAM, B E Wood's Bluff, .Alabama 

BARTOW EBERHART, B 8 A Columbus, Georgia 

B HTITZPATRICK, BSi Montgomery. .-Bahama 

J M HURT, BE Citronelle 

WH JONES, BS Union Springs, " 

HOWARD LAMAR, B A Hamilton, Georgia 



RFLIGON,lR, B E 
WW PEARSON, HA 

J M EEID, B E 



Tuskogee, Alabama 

Mobile 

Pilot Point, Texas ■ 



1883. 



a 
u 



W H BRUCE, B A Milltown, Alabama 

WS COX, BE LaG range, Georgia 

W L ELLIS BE Prattville, Alabama 

C L GAY, BE Montgomery 

A L HARLAN, BS Dadeville 

M LHARP, Jr, BS A Atlanta, Texas 

D B MANGUM, B S A Selma > Alabama 

T F MANGUM, BA ^ elma .„- " 

A M McINTOSH, B S A • : -Dadeville 

E MPACE, B A Independence, Texas 

N P D SAMFORD, B A £ llbu ™! A1 » bama 

R L SUTTON, B A -East Point, Maine 






\ 




Honors 4 Pisttoctions 

■ 

Genft prod Session 188 3**84 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 

The four students of eac'i class in the different departments, who secure the highest grades above 90, 
are distingu^hed for excellence in scholarship, and are awarded honor Certificates. 



ENGLI8H. 

1. J. 8. Reese, 

2. A. J .Alexander 

3. E. T. Hollingsworth, 

4. W. H. Newman. 

BOTANY 

1. J. 6. Reese 

2. E. T. Hollingsworth, 

3. A. J. Alexander, 

4. W. H. Newman, 



MATHEMATICS. 

1. A. F. Whitfield. 

2. 8. C. Pitts, 

3. L. F. Howell, 

4. R 8. Burton, 

DRAWING, 
t. A. F. Whitfield, 

2. 8. C. Pitts, 

3. L. W. Spratling, 

4. L. F. Howell. 



LATIN. 
R. H. Thach. 

ENGINEERING. 

1. R. H. Thach, 

2. R. E. Collier, 

3. W. T. Andrews, 



ASTRONOaiY, 

2. J. W. Lockhart., 
1. W. D. Wood, 

3. F. C. Duke. 

GEOLOGY. 

1. W. L. Hutchinson, 

2. J. W. Lockhart, 

3. W. D. Wood, 

4. D. D. McLeod. 
MATHEMATICS. 

W. L. Hutchinson, 
W. D. Wood. 



{ 



MATHEMATICS. 

1. A. J. Bloch, 

2. G. II. Lamar, 

H. C. Armstrong, jr.. 
4. L. W. Wilkinson. 
DRAWING. 

1. J. S. Reese, 

2. R. L. Bennett, 

3. G. H. Lamar, 

4. E. K. Gordon. 

rrXXTTlZD CLASS. 

ENGLISH. 

1. A. F. Whitfield, 

2. A. J. Bloch, 

3. L. W. Wilkinson, 

4. C. W. Simmons. 

AGRICrLTURE. 

1. A.F. Whitfield, 

2. W. T. Penn, 

3. C. L. Newman, 
*, B. S. Burton, 

8ECCNE CL. A.C5S, 

MATHEMATICS. 
R. H. Thach. 
DRAWING. 

1. R. H. Thach, 

2. R. E. Collier. 

PHYSICS. 
R. II. Thach. 



^TTZ&T CLASS 

LATIN, 
f 1. J. W. Lockhart, 
\ W. C. Whitaker, 
2. D D. McLeod. 
METEOROLOGY. 

1. W. L. Hutchinson, 

2. J. W. Lockhart, 

3. W D. Wood, 

4. F. C. Duke. 
DRAWING. 

1. W. D. Wood, 

2. R. 8. Corry. 

ENGINEERING. 

W. D. Wood, 
R. 8. Corry. 

CHEMISTRY. 
W. L. Hutchinson. 



PHYSICS. 

1. J. S. Reese. 

2. A. J. Alexander. 

3. E. T.Hollingsworth, 

4. V. Allen. 

LATIN. 
I.V.Allen, 

5. P. M. Hoffman 

FRENCH. 
A. J. Bloch. 



PHYSIOLOGY. 

1. A. F. Whitfield, 

2. L. W. Wilkinson, 
H. S. C. Pitts, 

4. L F. Howell. 

CHEMISTRY. 

1. A. F. Whitfield. 

2. L.W.Wilkinson. 

LATIN. 
R. B. Smith. 



ENGLISH. 
W. T. Penn. 

TACTICS. 

1. R. H.Thach, 

2. R. E. Collier, 
a, W. T. Penn, 

4. W. T. Andrews. 



GREEK. 

1. J. W. Lockhart. 

2. W. C. Whitaker, 

3. D. D. McLeodr 

ENULT8II. 

1. W. L. Hutchinson, 

2. W. D. Wood, 

3. D. D. McLeod, 

4. J. W. Lockhart. 

MECHANICS. 

1. W. D. Wood, 

2. W. L. Hutchinson. 



TACTICS. 

f 1. W. L. Hut/»hinson ; 
\ J. B. Robinson. Jr. ' 

2. R. S. Corrv, 

3. J. W. Lockhart. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

E H. Boyd, 
L. R. Boyd, 
F. C. Duke, 
J. W. Lockhart, 
D. D. McLeod, 
W. C. Whitaker. 



BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING. BACHELOR OF SCIENCF. 

5* §: 9?*2l w - L Hutchinson, 

J; ?: ?£™i n ' J- B- Robinson, Jr. 

M.D.Wood. 



■' ' ' 



r 



Catalogue of Students. 

FOR THE SESSION 1883-'84. 

V 

ABBREVIATIONS. 

Rri ......Science. Ag Agriculture. 

J 11 - Literature. Eng Engineering. 

Sp.C Special Course. 

Gen * c General Course for Students of Third and Fourth Classes. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 

FIRST CLASS. 
Name. Residence. Course. 

Boyd, Benjamin Hart-well ..' Macon county Lit. 

Boyd. LoRoy Macon c >untv * Lit. 

Corry, Robert Samuel Butler countv Eng. 

Duke, Francis Columbus Georgia .' Lit. 

Hardin, Tabor Fleming Lee countv !..... ...... v Eng. 

, Hutchinson, Washington LaFayette Georgia " Se, 

Lockhart. John William Chambers county...; Lit. 

McLeod, Daniel J)ouglas ♦....Barbour countv Lit. 

Robinson, John Beverly Jr Tennessee Sc. 

Whitaker. Walter Claiborne Macon countv Lit. 

Wood, William Daniel Autauga county Eng. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Allen, James Montgomery county .> Kng. 

Andrews. William Thomas.... .....Barbour countv.....* Kng. 

Collier, Robert Edward Lee Lee County Kng. 

Mclntyre. Erastus Stonume Conecuh county Eng. 

Pelin. Walter Thomas Chambers county Ag> 

Thatch. Robert Henry.. Limestone county Eng. 

Trammell, Thomas Lee county Ag. 

Williams, Daniel Bullard Lee county Sp. C. 

THIRD CLASS. 

Allison. Gilmer Alexander Lee county Gen. C. 

Autrey, Charles Mallary Georgia....' Gen. C 

Bloch! Albert Jonathan Louisiana (Jen C. 

Boozer, Henry West Georgia ......Gen. C. 

Boykin. Robert Stafford Lee county Sp. C. 

Burton. Benjamin Sullivan Georgia....* Gen. C. 

Bullard. Charles Clarence chambers county Sp. C. 

Capps, Luther Martin Henry county Gen. C. 

Carter, Julius Ceasar Montgomery county Gen. c. 

Daugbtrv. Claude Isadorc Lee county Gen. C 

Davis, William Easier Lee county Gen. C. 

Hightower, Edward Woodam Lee county Sp. C. 

Hodge, Charles Wesley Randolph county Gen. C. 

Hoffman. Paul Mark Lee county • Gen. C. 

Horn. Eli ..Clay county Gen. C. 

Howell, Lawson Franklin Georgia Gen. C. 

Hutchinson. Thomas P Georgia ....Sp. C. 

Larkin, David Jackson county... Gen. C. 

Llovd. Edward Read Lee county , Sp.C. 

McCrorv, James Thomas Georgia Gen. C. 

Newman. Clifford Lewis Lee county Gen. C. 

Pace, M. Downer Lee county Gen. C. 

Paschal, Florence Elonza Etowah county Sp. C. 

Persons, Augustus Archilus Lee county Gen. c. 

Phillips, Berrien Troupe Lee county Sp. < . 

Pitts, Sterling Chambers ». Russell county Gen. (. , 

Sabel, Alex Montgomery county .Sp. c. 

Shaver. A rtemus Patterson Montgomery county *} on 'i/ 

Scott. Thomas Lee Chambers county Gen. . 

Simmons, Charles Woodward ., Dale county Gen. . 

Simmons, Robert Jasper Hogue Dale count; c,e , n - / 

Smith, Robert Billups Lee county .. Sp. f . 

Spratling, Leckinski Ware Lee county Gen. C. 

Tate, James Ulmer Dallas county .Gen. . 

Tillman. Henry Young Georgia Gen. C. 

Varner, Charles Monroe Chambers county Gen. ( . 

Weaver, Dudlev Saunders , Tennessee Gen. c. 

Whitfield. Augustus Foscue « w 3Iarcngo county .Gen. C. 

Wilkinson, Levi Washington rDale county ....Gen. C. 

Zellars, Thomas Peter Georgia Gen. t\ 



m—m 



10 



Alabama Agricultural wm Mechanical College. 



FOU^fi CLA8S. 

Mobile county Gen. & 

county Sp. t* 



Lee 






Alexander. Arthur John... 

Allen. Vassar Lyle 

Armstrong. Henry Clay Jr Jg. Lee -countv Gen. c 

Barnes, William Deans Jfi Florida 8p. c 

Barclay, Alexander Campbell../ Lawrence countv Gen. c 

Beddcll. Howard Album jfi.. Lee countv Gen. c 

Bennett. Robert Love jt. Lee county Gen, .c 

Bond. Edmund Gains ^. Mobile countv Gen. v. 

Bradford. John Nunn.,yf Lee countv....'. Sp. c 

Chapman, George Claience Wilcox county .# £p. C 

Chapman, John WiMIam Wilcox county *..Sp. c 

(tolcman, Dudley, Pleasant :. Perrv countv Sp. C 

Coleman. Reubert Edward Wilcox county 8p. c 

Crawford. A bjfln ego Jackson Lee county Gen. c 

Drake, JohiuHodges Jr Lee county Gen. c 

Friszle. William Clarke Bullo?k county Gen. c 

Gay. Kdtfrd Wright Montgomery countv Gen. v. 

Gordo*, Elgee Kingsbury.... Louisiana Gen. v. 

Greajrttm. James Clifford Lowndes county Gen. v 

Hawin. John Wesley Lee countv Sp. c 

Hiirris fcugene Willis Lee countv Gen. c 

Holland. Orlando Monroe Lee county Gen. c 

+ Hpllingsworth, Edward Tracy Etowah county , Gen. c 

f *Huguley, George Abner Georgia Sp. c 

f Johnson. William Samuel Dallas countv Gen. c 

Jones, Thomas Hiu?h Lee county..'. Sp. c 

ti in ? ai ;» Geo ^ e Ho " • L** countv . Gen. c 

McAuley. Sheridan Mobile Gen. c 

Neal, Fletcher A Lee county Sp. c 

Newman. Wilson Herbirk Lee countv Gen. c 

Oates, James Jethro Mobile.....*. Gen. c 

Persons, Henry Stanford Lee countv Gen. c 

Persons, James Turner Lee county Gen. c 

Keesc, James Simpson Florida Gen. r. 

Saudcr. Albert Texas Gen.«: 

builder, Oscar Texas Gen c 

Schowttlter. Mack Reynolds '.'.Mobile 'cMniyZ^'Z"ZZZZZZGe\u c 

Smith, Lawrence Avery Lee countv Gen. <• 

\aughn, William Watkins Dallas countv Sp c 

\\ ooley, Andrew Feaster : Georgia .....Gen. c 

^Regular in special two years course in Agriculture. 

SUB SECTION FOUTRH CLASS. 
Allison. Charles Lee countv 

R^ t !S!?«? ,l f lle i Jonei .....Jeflferson eountv! 

Boyd, Thomas Jackson -Lei» oonntv 

Broun, George Fleming lSSSSSS-' 

o^lT^.^z::zzzzzzz:' -H ?5™l 



DnvKkickc:::::::::::::::;:::::;::::::;;:;:;;;:::;;;-;": iBd'iSn SS2S' 

Dumas. Albert C t™™ "£' 



Dunklin. Joe Monteim^SSSSS' 

Glenn, Charles Bowles ... ZI Z ZZZZZ: # 22 

Greene, Za *h T ™ SJSSS* 

Js^ekBon^mi^C^nZZZZZZZZZ: teSSS" 



.f^iwovu. n uiiuin uurson t™ r , mint v 

Ue, George Forbes ZZ Z ZZZZZZZZZ l£ SSSS&' 

Lefebere, John ^uisiana 

Levy. Lionel Clarence Georgia" 

^^SSOSSS=z==== ...:..rz::::::;r.:: S < «: 

» K^i:::;:: = :z=:r 

Smith. Otis Oliver.;! ZZZZ^ZZ L^eount?' 

^mp? s v^ r n t / r ^ lc .l ,n izr.:zz:zsi»e53Sv 

Yloomer, Alexander Gait , Tpor>f»nntV 

^i^^ n nn ^ Luel Ja-w^ • zzznzzz::.vz:r~:HSj!fflS5SS: 

. V\ illlamson, Henry Pritchard GoonHn 

RECAPITULATION. ^ 

First Class n 

Second Class i 

Third Class ZZZZZZ 40 

Fourth Class ■' ?o 

Sub Fourth Class .". ™ 



Total. 



2G 



\ 








UNGEMENT^ 



1884-'85- 



m—m 



; 



Faculty and Officers 



FOR 1884-'85. 



<XJ&Z<X>- 



/ 



- 



War. LeROY BROUN, M. A., LL. D., 

- President. 

J. T. DUNKLIN,, A. M., LL. D., 

J'mfessor of Latin Language and History. 

W. C. STUBBS, A. M., 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, Jr., M. E., Ph. D., 

Professor of Xatural History and Geology. 

Rev. G. \Y. MAXSON. A. M.. M. E., 
Professor of English and Principal of Grammar School. 

Gen. J. H. LANE, C. E., A. M., 

Professor of Civil Engineering anel Dreacing. 

J. S. NEWMAN, 

Professor of Agriculture, and Director of the Experiment Station. 

C. C. THACH, B. £., 
Professor of Modern Languages and English Literature. 

Major T. II. FRAZER, B. E., 
Ommawktni and Instructor in Mathematics and Languages. 

W. L. HUTCHINSON, B. S., 
Assistant in Laboratory. 

W. U. AGREE, B. 8., 

Assistant in Laboratory. 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D., 

Surgeon. 

Cf. C. THACH, 

Recording Secretary. 

P. H. MELL, Jr., 
< 'orreaponding Secretary. 

R. T. GLENN, 
Librarian. 



■ 



Terms of Admission. 



Candidates for admission into the Fourth Class must be of good moral character and not less thaa 
fourteen years of age, and will be requlied to pass an approved examination in the following subjects.: 

Geography, History of the United States. 6 «j^.mi 

Ekglish,— 1. An examination upon sentences containing incorrect English. 

2. A composition giving evidence of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, grammar, and 
division into paragraphs. The subject of composition for lttti-tfii will be taken from one of the follow- 
ing works, Scott's Lady of the Lake, or Ivanhoe, David CoDperfleld. 

Mathematics,— The whole of Arithmetic ; Algebra to Quadratic Equations, as in Olncy's Complete 
Ateebra -Geometrical Drawing, as in Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book. Especial attention is catted 
to imperfect preparation in Arithmetic and Algebra. 

For admission to the Latin-Science Course, a satisfactory examination will be required in the fol- 
owing additional subjects— Latin Grammar (Allen & Grecnough), Latin Lessons (Leigh ton's), Ceawir 
i i Books.) 

Entrance examinations will be hold on Monday and Tuesday preceding the opening in Septemocr. 
at which all applicants should be present. 

If, upon examination, an applicant should be found deficient in any of the required studies, he will 
be assigned to a course of preliminary training in the Grammar School ; provided, that in no case will 
an applicant be admitted whose attainments in the English branches are not such that he may, with 
one year's training, be prepared for the studies of the Fourth Class. 

Students are advised to enter regularly some one of the prescribed courses, but they mav, at the dis- 
cretion of the Faculty, with the written approval of the parent or guardian, be assigned to selected 
studies ; provided, that in no case will a student be allowed to have less than fifteen weekly recita- 
tions, or equivalent work. 

Students, on their arrival at Auburn, must report immediately to the President, and present their 
testimonials and instructions. 

After having paid their fees to the Treasurer and matriculated, they will report to the Examining 
( 'ommittee, by whom they will be assigned to appropriate classes. The Commandant will furnish each 
student with a copy of th3 Regulations, and assign him to his proper section and company. 

No student will be admitted to recitation in any class previous to matriculation. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

For students who are not prepared for the regular College classes the Preparatory department is rogT 
ularly organized under the direction of an experienced Professor. These students are subject to the 
discipline and regulations of the College. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Students who are not candidates for a decree will be permitted to take, with the advice of the Fac- 
ulty, such subjects as they may prefer, and for which they may be qualified. An opportunity will be 
offered to study Greek, though this is not required for any degree, provided there is no 
conflict with the prescribed schedule of recitations. The amount of Greek taught will be about 
equivalent to what is found in MfcClintoh's 1st and 2nd Books. 

DRAWING. 

All students in the College, or the Grammar school, are required to take for two years a regular 
course in drawing. 



J 






•VMM 



Courses of Instruction. 



There ar • throe ropular Courses of stu<lv each leading to the degree of Bachelor of science. 

I.- COURSE IN AGRICULTURE AND CHEMISTRY. 
II.— COURSE TN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 
III.— LATIN -SCIENCE COURSE. 



The design of this course is to furnish a plan of study, 



1'.,- course to Agriculture and Chemistry. The design of this course is to lurnish a plan oi stuoy, 
which include* theoretical and practical instruction in the principles of correct husbandry and in 
those sciences which relate tQ Chemistry and Agriculture, and will be especially adapted to those who 
propose to devote themselves to Agricultural or Chemical pursuits. This course requires lour years lor 



Ut Term. 
3 English. 
2 History. 
*> Mathematics. 
5 Elementary Physics. 
"» Drawing. 
Drill. 



Forirni class. 



ta completion and embraces the following subjects. 

I.— Course in Agriculture and Chemistry. 

THIRD CLASS. 
2nd Term. l$t Term, 

3 English. SI English. • 

•J History. 2 History. 

."» Mathematics. :» Mathematics 

:? Physics. 2 Nat. Hist .ry. 5 Chemistry. 

'.) Drawing. 
:» Agriculture. 
Drill. 



Drawing. 



Drill. 
SECOND CLASS. 



• . Ut Term. 
:\ English. 
j\ Physics. 
/I Chemistry. 
2 Agriculture. 
2 Natural Historx. 
1 Tactics. 
"> Drawing. 
. Lnnorutorv work. 
Drill. 



2nd Term. 



:{ English. 
:» Physics. 

4 Chemistry. 
2 Agriculture. 

2 Natural History. 
1 Tactics. 

5 Drawing, 
Laboratory work. 

Drill. 



\st Term. 
2 English Literature. 
:I Mechanics. 
:t Natural History. 
2 Agriculture 



2nd Term. 
3 English. 
2 History. 
.") Mathematics. 
:\ Chemistry. 
/ ft Drawing. [ry. 

:) Agriculture. 2 Nat. Ilisto- 
Drill 

FIRST CLASS. 

2nd Term. 
2 Political Economy. 
:) Astronomy. 

1 Natural History, 

2 Agriculture. 



I ludustrialu/hemistrv 1 Industrial Chemistry. 
1 Tactics. 1 Tactics. 

Laboratory work. Laboratory work. 



II.— Course In Mechanics and Engineering, 

This course embraces the following subjects: 

Fourth class and third class pursue the same studies ;is in course I. 



V, W Term. 
U\) :\ English. 

•A Physics. 

") Mathematics. 

fi Engineering. 

'."> Drawing. 
••' 1 Tactics. • 
•' i Drili. 



SES0NDCLAS8. 

2l«i Term. 
(a) :'» English. 
:; Physics. 
5 Mathematics. 
r> Engineering. 
5 Drawing. 
1 Tactics. 



jWRST CLASS 

IM Term 
i a) 2 Eng. Literature 

:\ Mechanics. 

'J Natural History 

:i Mathematics. 

" Engineering. 

5 Drawing. 

1 Tactics. 



Drill. 
Notk.— French or German may be substituted forsubjects marked (a) 

III.— Lfitin Science Course, 

This embraces the follow ina subjects: 
FOl'KTII CLASS. 

2nd Tom. 
.'> English. 
2 History. 
"> Latin.* 
5 Mathematics. 
5 Drawing. 



2nd Term. 
(a). 2 Political Economy. 
. :'. Astronomy, 
2 Natural History. 
:'» Mathematics. 
") Engineering, 
r. Drawinir. 



1 Tactics. 



\st Term. 
:\ English. 
2 History. 
."> Latin. 
5 Mathematics. 
5 Drawing. 
Drill. 



1st Term. 

5 Latin. 
2 History. 
5 Mathematics. 
."> Chemistry. 



Drill. 



SECOND CLASS. 



1st Term 
.'{English 
:1 Physics 
."> Mathematics 
:i Latin 

2 Botany (optional) 
I Chemistry 
"> Dm wing 
1 Tactics 
Drill 



2nd Term 



3 English 
:\ Physics 
5 Mathematics 

3 Latin 

2 Botany (optional) 

4 Chemistry 

5 Drawing* 
1 Tactics 

Drill 



R Agriculture. 
."> Drawing. 
Drill. 



l«t Term 
2 Eng Literature 
R Mechanics 
2 Nat History 
5 French 
4 German 
1 Tactics 
Laboratory work opt'l 



THIRD CLASS. 

•>'•» Md Term. 
5 Latin. 

2 History, (optional) 
."> Mathematics. 
:' Chemistry. 
2 Natural History. 
:* Agriculture. 
."> Drawing. 
Drill. 
FIRST CLASS. 

2nd Term 

2 Political Economy 

3 Asjtfonomv 
2 Kit History 
") French 

4 German 
1 Tactics 

Laboratory work opt'l 



(Note,— The figures indicate the number of weekly recitations required in the studies to which they 
are affixed.) 



/> 



<~ 



SPECIAL INFORMATION. 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 



Physics and Astronomy. ' „ 

president broun. 

The instruction is given by regular recitations from text-books, combined with lecturer, illustrat. I 
I)v experiments. The first part of the Course is occupied with Elementary Rational Mechanics, treat" 1 
graphically, avoiding, as far as possible, complex mathematical symbols'. 

This is followed by a full discussion of Molecular Mechanics. Wnile due prominence is given to 
principles, constant reference Is made to the Applications of tfcience. 

In the First Class the subjects studied are Astronomy and Mechanics, In the study of Mechanics in 
this class Mathematical Analysis is used. 

Text-Books— Atkinson's GanotOT Daniel's Physics, White's Astronomy, Peek's Mechanics. 



i 



'mentary 



LATIN LANGUAGE AND HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR DUNKLIN. 

The subjects taught In this Department are the Latin -Language and History. 

Lati£\— The modes of instruction are by translation from the Latin texts into English, and rift 
verm, orally and in writing. 

A systematic course of exercises, illustrative of the principles of Latin, Etymology and Syntax, are 
carried on, in connection with the reading Of th9 authors prescribed. 

The progress of the student is valued not so much by the number of books read as by his ability to 
read Latin, and explain the principles of Interpretation and constriction. 

A course in general History, Ancient and Modern, is given in the Third and Fourth classes. 

LATIN TEXT-BOOKS. 

Fi'RTH Class.— Cicero's Orations, Virgil. ^Composition, Mythology. Ancient Geography. 
Third Class.— Horace, Odes, Satires, Epistles. Composition (Jones.) 

Second Class.— Tacitus Germania and Agricol i. Cicero de Otttciis. Latin Composition' Elemei 
Creek. McClintock's 1st. and 2nd. Books or equivalent. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

White's Junior Student's Lexicon, Harper's Latin Lexicon. Smith's Classical Dictionary and Antiq- 
uities Zumpt's and Madvig's Latin Grammars. Ginn & Heath's Classical Atlas. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR STLBBS, ASSISTANTS. IHT< HIKSON AM) A( KIT. 

There are three Courses in this Department— 
I. A General Course for all students. 
ll.A Scientific Course. 
III. An Agricultural Course. 

I.— GENERAL COURSE. 
Cons ? sts of a seriesof daily lectures and recitations in Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, fully Ulus- 
' tm^Xwi^nte Chemical principles are thoroughly plained together with fte r appliea. 
ion to theyarioua arts and industries, fecial attention given bthc Composition Of boils, Fertili- 
sers MetelirOrTaSd TlMM Products. All the students of the Third Class pursue this Course. 
'1 ext- Book.— Bloxam's Chemistry with Professor's Not< s. 

II.— SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

^n^ar^M 

^^«^r is devoted to Qualitative an^Qu^^^^ 

<fec. Having finished the General Course the studeii ^fLf^^^^^^JSS e remaining 
the necessary reagents, &e., and required t( work .t h ..:-. two hours per oaj inrougn 

' ' y0 rST-BooKS.-Church's Laboratory Guide CaidWC^ AgrieuIiUI^ Analys!,, &*tf« Manual oi ( 'h< l> 

III —AGRICULTURAL COURSE. /. 

Consists of three years: 1st General Chemistry. 2nd/ Agricultural Analys;:, M . Agr;cultun;l 

. ( ^ ta£ and second years are the same as Sciatic f£^^ ; 

, Indue third year the students pursue ( hemistn m its Special I h»iuuii 
JteW-I.ooks.-ITcw Crops Grow (Johnson), How Crops Feed (Johnson). 

MATHEMATICS. 

rnoFEssoR «" T "-- vclir . A w el)rUi „„ ( i Geometry, six books ; 

The general course for the first two y^^^f^%^M^nmetrf, Surveying. Mensura- 
second year. Solid and Spherical Geometry, Plane and bpnenca 
tion. and Simple Railway Curves. «r««tai rHsrtoline i 2nd. A thorough knowledge of the 

Two objects are sought to be attained-lst. Mental disc ipnac ■ ^ _^ 

practical applications. 



——■— —■ ^IM^BBMV 



16 Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

The completion of this Course, common to all students, lays the foundation for the Pure and Ap- 

8 lied Mathematics of the Mechanical and Engineering Course, and qualifies those who discontinue 
lie subject at this point to go into the field and shop, and do good and useful work. 
Analytical Geometry, Descriptive Geometry and Calculus are pursued in the Engineering Course. 
Especial attention is given to their practical applications. During the entire Course instruction in 
text-books is supplemented by lectures. . _ , ,. • , ... ... . . 

Solutions of original practical problems arc required of the student, to make him familiar with the 
application of principles, to test his knowledge, and make him self-reliant and independent. 

N. B. 8pecial attention is called to imperfect preparation, for admission to the fourth Class, in 
Arithmetic and Algebra. It is so common as to prove a serious obstacle to progress in this Depart- 
ment. The importance of thorough preparation cannot well be overestimated. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 
Olney's Algebra. Wentworth's Geometry, Schuyler's Surveying, Halstead's Metrical Geometry, 
Loomis' Analytical Geometry, (new edition) Warren's Descriptive Geometry,, Loomis' Calculus (new 
edition). 

NATURAL HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR MELL. • 

Geology.— This subject is studied in the Fall Term of the last year. 

Special attention is given to the Geology of Alabama. The course isgiveu by text-books and Lec- 
tures, illustrated by means of Diagrams, Maps and various Rocks, Fossiliferous and Non-Fossiliferous, 
to be found in the Geological Cabinet. Attention is given to the nature and origin of Ore deposits, 
Mineral Springs, and origin and Geological relations of Soil. 

Mineralogy.— The Course is devotea to a general analysis of Crystalization, illustrated by Glass and 
Wood models : and Blowpipe analysis of all the common Minerals that form the basis of our soils. 

Zoology.— Those students pursuing the Agricultural Course are required to take this subject. 

A systematic arrangement of the Animal Kingdom, in accordance with natural affinities, is made a 
special feature.of the instruction. 

BroMOLOGY.— This subject is studied after the completion of Zoology. Particular attention is given 
to Insects injurious to vegetation, their habits, and the methods best adapted lor checking their rava- 
ges. 

Botany.— The students of the Fourth Class begin the study of Botany, and continue throughout 
the term. Analytical work is made an important feature. The Class is provided with Plants from the 
neighboring fields, and taught how to determine their specific names. This work is sufficiently ex- 
haustive to enable the student, after completing the Course, to name, unassisted, any of the ordinary 
Weeds and Grases that he will encounter in this section. 

In the second Class in the Course in Agriculture and Chemistry, a sufficient amount of time is devo- 
ted to Systematic and Structural Botany, and to advanced Laboratory work with the microscope, in 
the preparation of specimens showing plant structure. 

Meteorology.— This subject is required of all students of the First Class. The instruction is im- 
parted by text-books and leetures. The system adopted by the United States Signal Service is made a 
distinctive feature of the Course. 

Physiology.— This topic is required of all students of the Third Class and is completed in the second 
term of the session. The text is illustrated by class demonstrations and experiments. 

TEXT-BOOK8. 

LeConte's Geology, Dana's Geology Dana's Manual of Mineralogy, Brush's Determinate Mineralogy 
and Blowpipe, Tenny's Zoology, Brooks' Hand Book of Invertebrate Zoology, Harris' Insects Injurious 
to Vegetation, Packard's Insects, Bessy's Botany, Gray's Botany, A pgar's Plant Analysis, Chapman's 
Flora of Southern States, Loomis' Meteorology, Martin's Human Body. 

ALABAMA WEATHER SERVICE. 

The United States Signal Service has established in Alabama a State Svstem for collecting meteorolo- 
gical data relating to climatic changes. The service is now in successful operation with the Central 
oBlce located at this Institution. Bulletins are issued at the cjose of each month, compiled from re- 
ports sent the Director from numerous stations scattered throughout the State. An opportunity is 
thus orrerdd tlie students in Meteorology for becoming familiar with the system so long successfully 
operated by the Department at Washington. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

_ , , PROFESSOR LANE. 

[he special studies in this Department begin in the Second Class, and are as follows: 
8kond CLASS—IUilroad Curves, Ordinate*, Turnouts, Crossings, Leveling, Gradients, Setting Slope 
Stakes, Excavations. Embankments and Railway Appliances K p 

•J^^S^^^ 11 ^^*^^ 8 ' 8 ^ 11 ^ 11 ^ Materials, Strains, Mortars and Cements, Masonry, 
foundations on Land and in Water. Framing, Roofs, Arches, Bridges, Topographical Surveying, Com' 
mon Roads, Pikes and Railroads, Canals, River and Sea Coast Improvements. 
Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

<_ ^ „ , . ™ , . TEXT-BOOKS. 

Second CLA8S.—Henck's Field Book, Gillespie.s Roads and Railroads, Barn's Railwav Am>11im<w 

thrtr^Statai" w h ith , S^ ngl,leering • ft " d AUan ' 8 8trength °"* am ° ™ de ' ' Se^LoXor 

DRAWING. 

The Fourtt , Ctass students practice Linear and Mode! Drawing inTe Third Ctass the elementary 
JretougS. °* raP ^metrical Projections, Shades £nd Shadows? and PtSeticS Pcr?£°«ve 



m^^mt 




V 



o 



Alabama Agricultural and Medianiwl College. 



17 




Shades 
and 



The Firflt Class are .taiight "Perspecti've"an1cl Topographic Drawing ; Drawings of Machine*, 

Roofs, fridges ,<&c. Plans, loonies and Sections of 'Railroad Surveys' complete the instruction 
in this J)ej>ajctnient. . ».»■ .-. ».......- l4ll4 »».„.., ( ' 

TEXT BOOKS 

FoURTft Class.— Davidsqn's Linear Drawing, Davids jii's Model Drawing. 

Third Class.- 1 - Da vldsdn's-ProjectionsVDavidstfn'a Practical Perspective* 

Second Class.— Davidson's Building Construction, MinihVs Mec&anica( Drawing. [College. 

First Ql ass.— Mahan's Industrial Drawing, French, German and American Plates belonging to the 

AGRICULTURE. 

PROF. j. S. NEWMAN. 

* * ' - 

instruction in this department commences with the Third or Sophomore Class and continues through 
the Second and First Classes. The subject is taught principally by lectures in which it is treated as an 
applied science, making the application of the teachings of the natural sciences to the aft of agricul- 
ture, using the farm of the Experiment Station as a laboratory for the practical illustration of the lec- 
ture room instruction. ' 

The classes accompany the professor (who is also Director of the Station), into the field, garden, e?^ 
chard, vineyard,. th£ gre^n' hmise and stock yard, where lectures are delivered in the presence of the 
work in progress; tnlfobjectf aird resnlts of ejcperimeuts,explained i the propagation, plantiug, pruning 
and cultivation 1 of plants' illustrated, 1 and so far as deemed necessary for thorough instruction manual 
labor required' of the students in- any and every department of v U>e t farm. ' The principles of 
breeding are taught in the' lecture room and- the practice illustrated on ,the farm. 

ed 




AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

J. S. NEWMAN, DIRECTOR. 
Profj. \Vft. C Stubbj^ Chemist. ' ' " 



Wi L. Hutchinson. | Assistants. 
W. U. Acbkk. 



. f Assistants, 
the professor oi'agricul- 




MODERN LANGUAGES AND ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

PBOF. C. 0. vTHACH. 

ENGLISH. 

In this department the student will be rairrWrough a Q^in«UcoowN of study tattg >J**»* 
Ungua«e and Literature In the purses of Mnjfegh &£*#**J$f i^iU^lofted £? 

55SS1M2 ^L'ur^iweTk^tudy of Grammar: The principles of special and general comport- 

t %23&K^. p ^ 8ClectIon8 ol *"» andPoctry - 

^^SS~ton^w^5gffi^Kawl«* «*-!«, Shakespeare, Goldsmith, Milton, 
^^ss^ursflrstter^ut^ 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

2nd term— Otto's Grammar, part II ■: French Composition, Racine s Atnaue. 
3r4 term— Com 1 position, Scientific French. .. u .. i:_,e> 



18 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechmical College. 



Orrm \n— 1st term— Otto's Grammar, part T : Exercises in writing Gorman, German Readings. 
2nd term— Chiller's Wilhelm Tell. Otto's Grammar, pnrt II. 
:trd term -Scientific German and Compaction. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 



CGI* W. LKROY BROUN, PRESIDENT. 



MA.1. T. II. FllAZEK. COMMANDANT. 



Military Science und Tactics are reouircd to be taught in this Institution by law. This law is faith- 
fully carried out. by imparting to each student not physically incapacitated to bear arms, practical in- 
struction In the School of the Soldier.^f the Company, and of the Battalion : also in. Guard Mounting. 
ImmectionN. Dress Parade. Kevlews.de. The College is provided, by the State, with breceh-loading 
Cadet mnskets. swords and accoutrements. 

The following uniform has been prescribed for dnss. viz. : Sack coat of West Point Cadet grey : grev 
pants, vest and cap : trimmings black. A very neat and serviceable dress suit can be obtained here at 
nbout Mrt. This is less expensive than the usual clothing. All students are required to wear this uni^ -' 
form at all times during the term. 

The Drills are short, and the military duty involves no hardship. The Military Drill is a health- 
giving exercise, and its good effects in the development of the physique and improvement of the car- 
riage of the Cadet are manifest. 

The entire body of stud' ^ts is divided into companies. The officers are selected for proficiency in 
drill, deportment and studies. Each ccmprny is offcered by one Captain, one 1st. Lieutenant, and 
one 2nd Lieutenant, with a proper number of Sergeants and Corporals. The officers and non- 
commissioned officers are distinguished by appropriate insignia of .rank. These appointments are 
conferred by the Faculty, on nomination oi the Commandant, and are continuous unless forfeited h* 
absence or misconduct. 

No military duty is reouircd of 'he privates of the First ( lass, except to Drill with the Battalion 

The First and Second Classes recite once a week in Militarv Tactics. 



POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. ' 

There arc two Pout-Graduate Degrees— 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

CIVIL ENGINEER. 

Any graduate of this College, who shall, after graduation, actively engage for at leu*t rhr.*» v**» in 
iterary or scientific work in the line of his profession, and wbu mav 'i^Tn^V^fau^ mmfl^ nv 

of^DipVoma^ ^' losit wilh »» p TK*WW the amount 

subjeei f«Staftothrir^5faJrtM? ' V " mnt '" t,,c F,K:ult5 ' wtisf «^»-y theses upon some 

«jSto fcJT d,M,tC " m " y PrOSt< ' Ute toe S, " ,,i,>s in ""J' '*P«»me»t <»• tl.e College without payment of 



CERTIFICATES OF DIf TINCTION 



provided their 
xam inations of thai 



RECOEDS AND CIRCULARS. 

■^ toSSmpfSSSS^ S ° f ,h ° *"* ,rc *W ''>■ *0 « * <™ of instruction. .„ „ form 
From this record a eireular or statement I s sent to t he parent or guardian monthly. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

t4 V ^SJ^ lteti0nS ° r m0nth,V «•»*«*»! «>n the studies of the month are held at the option of 

4^' *"" WrUtCn ° r ° rol —'-"on, or both, are heid on the studies passed over 
.Special examinations are held only by order of tho r*,„n 
tions be permitted. y uy onur of the Faculty, and in no com will private cxamina- 

Students falling below the minimum grade at tho fln»i ^ < ^ 
hi f^J^ XSt ! °2 , L on ^tisfactory examination^^ . can bo P™moted to the next 

ft is required that every student who entere the UoElf n next ses «o"- 
finfE? ? f the f™/ J** v <*<" al>sence "n ™ h^S^feui^ r ^«*? through the examinations at 
W %1^ -ilUherefore, not be granted 

*T™7i^ e *^ V^" ^ lho8C ° f theFirst Class, are requirnd to 

Examinations for Degrees or ( >rtlfiratf4 «f r^iw , 

Courac. ^ 0rtlfioate8 of Probcmey embrace, , ho eiltiro 8ubject of study ln the 



w- 



Alabama Agricultural and Meclianieal College. 
. MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. 



19 



Many valuable additions have been made*to the various branches of this Museum within the past 
^Contributions have been received from different States of the I'nion, from Knjrland, Italy, Prance 

,in ^?Ge^ow U o?AliKmi is well illustrated with minerals, fossiliferous ami non-fossiliferous rocks 
from the different formations of the State. . The Museum is divided into the following <tePJ*toenta : 
Sra^ogiml Concholo^ical, Geological. Zoological and Botanical. Each departmeutis systematical- 

^^ Private Cabinet belou K in* to the Professor of 

Natural History, numbers more than 30.000 specimens. 



MUSEUM OF MECHANIC ARTS. 

Some r>roure«s has been made in establishing a Museum of Mechanic Arts. ^J»*ft^hjs town 
the various processes and products of manufacture. 

. MUSEUM OF AGRICULTURE. 

The AKrieulturiil Museuir ti invito .gafft^^^ 

^of^^ 

Oats, Corn, Pears, Grasses, &c. 



CHEMICAL LABORATORY 




STATE 



LABORATORY AND LABORATORY OF EXPERIMENT 

STATION. 



\\"M. C STUBE8 CHEMIST IN CHABOK. 



W. l : . ACHBB) Assistants. 
W. Ij. Hutchinson J 
11 nt iii nil its appointments has been established at 

JSfiS£££S» |«S¥^WoT&ri «■ *£*«■ a Department 
1st, Analvsls of Commercial Fertilizers required dj aci 

"&W& of Minerals, Marls, and Ores for Department of AKrleultnre, 
:srd. Analyses for State Experiment Station. 

4th. Analyses for private parties. , heI1 tllken aecordinR to instructions furnished 

Analyses under first head are made without ehar R t it d(mc when ordered by 



iwrs. Ores, Marls, Waters, &c. iitetive determinations have been made. 

Hesidesthe above a number of quantitative utu 



LIBRARY. 



hooks according to regulations prescribed by the Faculty. %A ^ p. . , ( 



— i 



^^™ 



20 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
PRINTING OFFICE. 



By authority of the Board of Trustees a complete* outfit f(*r printing has Wri 
purchased for the purpose of economv and convenience, in printing , tjie 
reports, bulletins, Ac., and to afford facilities to the ?tijdente of the coir 



ege for learning type setting. The printing office occupies? two rooms in the 
college building and will be open each afternoon for practice by the cadets. 



1 
cc 



DISCIPLINE, 



»> 



The government of the College isadministered by the President and Faculty, 
in accordance, with the Code of Laws and Regulations enacted by the Trustees, 
and furnished to each student upon matriculation. , % , 

Attention to study, and punctuality in attendance on» recitations, and all 
other duties, will be made the condition of every student's continuance J at the 
College. * ;../ . 

Students are prohibited from having in their poss^seion weapons or artiis ndt 
issued for the performance of military duty. 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES 



V 



) -> 



i f 



i • • 



In 



Religious services are heldevery morning in the Chapel, 

TTbe students are required to attend these exercises, and also, to attend the ? " 
church of their choice "at 'least once on Sunday. Opportunities are also offered ' 
for attending Bible Classes every Sunday. 



LOCATION AND. BUILDING. 

The College is situated in the town of Adburn, sixty miles from Montgomery, • 
directly on thjfe line of the Western ^Railroad. • ',,.-, 
The region is high and healthful-~i821 feet above tide water. 
The College building is an excellfejQt brick edifice, which has. recently been 
thoroughly refitted and repainted; trtt^fbur storjes, containing, in all, thirty- 
eigftt rooms, including -two well furtofched society jhalla, l<$ture rooms'and offi- /[; - 
ces, with Chemical Laboratory, Cabinets and AgricultumlMuseum.* 11 - 

J I • ■ ) r 

TV ,...• , r,. LAtfQDONIJALL. 

This is a separate Hall recently erected, the second story of which is a com- 
modious audience room 90 by 50 feet, appropriated to public exercises. The 
lower story is designed for an armory and other purposes. 

By statute of the State, the sale of spirituous liquors and keeping of gaming 
saloons of every kind, within five miles of Auburn, are forbidden. 




APPROPRIATIONS BY THE STATE LEGISLATURE. 

r^L^L^ 1 *^ ^^ 8 ,^ 6 a PP r °P™ted the sum of $30,000 to this 
SXG.rt!, a!^ ♦ ln * bu,ld * mgS ' ?P aire > the P urchase of apparatus for 
£ri££ tLtTT^A**- Ahn .' for the P«rpo^ of establisfi£g an Ex- 
SSS^Tte kL ^^ «!««■«*■ ancfillustrate improved m!thod?1n 
agriculture, and to have such chemical analyses of commercial fertilisers iriade 



Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College. 21 

as may be required, there was appropriated to this College a portion of the 
amount accruing from the special tax on all fertilizers sold in the State. 

The Departm^to^^ law {qc$jM 

Auburn. I he office of the Commissioner is in the College building. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two Literary Societies-the Wirt and Websterian-coniurted with 
the College. Lach has a commodious hall, handsomely fitted up, a library of 
standard and miscellaneous works, and a reading room. Their weekly exerci- 
ses add to the facilities afforded by the College for practice in composition elo- 
cution and discussion. 

These Societies hold celebrations on the evenings of Thank giving' Day and 
the 22nd of February, and also on Monday and Tuesday evenings during Com- 
mencement week. They elect, annually, with the approval of the Faculty, an 
orator to represent them at the close of the year. x 



ARBOIiDAY. 

The 22ud of February is designated, by order of the Tru. oos, Arbor Day. 
* It is a holiday, on which students are encouraged, with ceremonial celebra- 
tions, to take part in planting trees on the College grounds. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the Society, is delivered in the 
Chapel, Wednesday afternoon o; Commencement week. T. H. Frazer, Presi- 
dent; T. J. Lamar, Vice President; C. C. Thach, Treasurer and Secretary; 
W. H. Blake of 79, Orator for 1884—85. 

ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP. 

At its last an:: . :al meeting," June 24, the Society established a scholarship to 
be known a 3 tlb Alumni Scholarship. The fund for the scholarship is to be 
raised by volu liiry contributions from members of the society, to be paid an- 
nually, and ;■•.«. oeneficiary is to be elected j/ the Society at its annual meeting 
in June. ..; Executive Committee, wh'j have charge of this fun^d for the 
■p ;ccij- \ir and to whom all communications should be directed, are Messrs. 
-. - i r.:zer and C* C. Thach, Auburn, Ala., and Mr. C. H. Lindsey, Mo- 
bile Ah. . 

Great good is to be expected from this movement, and the society should 
congratulate itself upon this advancement toward permanent organization. 



BOARDING. 

■I t 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, will not be permitted to make 
changes without obtaining permission from theFaculty,having first given tw6 
weeks' notice. 

The Faculty are authorized to remove students from boarding-houses when it 
becomes manifest that they are failing in their duties from improper associa- 
tions, or for any other reason requiring such removal. 



22 Alabanta Agricultural and Methanical Golkge. 

EXPEN8E8. 

TUITION FREE TO ALL CADETS, IN OK OUT OF THE STATE. 

Incidental fee, per term, in advance *j> ^ 

Library fee, per annum 2 50 

ET!n prWate families, per month with fuel and light, $12 to 15 00 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 
Parents and guardians are requested to deposit with the Treasurer of the Col- 
lege all funds designed for sons or wards, whether for regular charges of Col- 
S fees and boarS or any other purpose. It is the duty of thxs officer to keep 
safely all funds placed in his hands, and to pay for all expenses incurred by 
the student, including board, uniform, books, Ac., only when approved by the 
President. A monthly statement of the receipts and expenditures will be for- 
warded. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

The Academic Year, which is divided into two equal terms, commences on 
the last Wednesday in September, and ends on the last Wednesday in June 
following, which is Commencement day. The second term begins on the sec- 
ond Wednesday in February. 

\ 

CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE MUSEUM. 

The follow iug persons have made valuable additions to the various branches 

of the Museum: ,,. _, 

J. N. Bradford, J. T. McCrorv, L. Payne, Dr. J. T. Tichenor, Miss M. 
White, Mrs. F. A. Lipscomb, R. W. Burton, T, L. Cunningham, S. H. Trow- 
bridge, J. D. Trammell, S. J. Armstrong, Rev. J. M. Mason, A, F. Whitfield, 
J. M. Allen, Mrs. Bush, Mrs. P. H. Mell, W. E. Davis, C. M. Awtrey, Judge 
H. D. Clayton, G. N. Gilmer, Prof. W. C. Stubbs, George Broun, L. Boyd, 
B. B. Ross, Prof J. 8. Newman, Miss Newman, D. D. McLeod, N. Davis, 
Miss. F. B. Payne, L. Levy, Mrs. 0. D. Smith, Mrs. C. C. Perry, B. H. 
Boyd, J. D. Trammell, S. McAuley, W. Persons, Mrs. R. B. Smith, Prof. 
John M. Tyler, James Mason, B. C. Haryy, Mr. Rennel, Mrs. Hurt, Joe 
Holifield, Bliss Kate Dowdell, Mr. Caslin W. Slaughter, Rev. W. E. Lloyd, 
Maj. T. H. Frazer, C. E. Mason, Paul Hoffman, Dr. Thomas S. Cobb, H. C. 
Armstrong, Jr. 

Complete set of standard weights and measures from the United States Gov- 
ernment. 



v- 



1 




1884-'85. 

Entrance Examinations Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 22-23. 

Opening of Session. _ Wednesday, Sept. 24. 

Intermediate Examinations F ^'. 4 *!?' 

Opening of Second Term Wednesday Feb. 11. 

Commencement Sermon * , Sunday June 21 

Commencement day Wednesday June 24. 



r 



^ 



211850 



■ 



C I R C U LAR . 



• >:#it 



i 



this institution is to teach primarily the principles aild the ap- 
plications «>f Science, at the same time not neglecting the fundamental disci- 
pline ob ahied by a careful study of the Languages, All students are required 
tostndv the English Language; the French, German and Latin Languages are 
optional, being require I only m one course of study. 

ThisCollegeH i no' undertake tip teach any handicraft,, trade, or special skill 
in any art, b\\ ; :i h j sh «i tim ! a student is under its influence it will endeav- 
or t<> subject him to tbeekactand accurate training of science-discipline. 
giving prominence in all cases to the teachings of the sciences and their ap- 
plications. 

A a valuable auxiliary to this science-training all students will be ttfttght 
geom >trieal drawing, a studv which tends to train both the eve and the hand to 
accuracy of observation and execution. 

It i expected! that a Laboratory for Pnictical Mechanics will befitted up 
within tlu^ year, whero the students under the supervision of a trained Professor 
will be taught practically the applications of the principles of mechanics. 

The departments ofEngineering and Physics will he supplied with new 
apparatus.. 

By act of the legislature the office of the Commissioner of. Agriculture and 
the Agri ill I Experiment Station for the state of Ala. , are located at Al- 
burn. The Profe • r of Agriculture i s also Director of the Experiment Stati< n, 
and the Prof of Chemistry is State Chemist whose duty it is to analyze fert> 
'i'-;'^. 1 benefit of the general agricultural interests of the state. 

Tlis public work dune at Auburn in behalf of the agricultural and industrial 

& re t« of li • ate affords to students an unusual opportunity to become fa- 
miliar with ks agr^^ defects and remedies. 

fn llu ' Chemical Laboratory las: year many analyses were made and the ro" 
suits reported in the regular bulletins. 

, While every n tendon will be given to the mental discipline of the studen 
to endeavoring to train them to habits of accurate scientific thought 'mid thus 
quality, than tor the duties of life, their moral and christian training will al- 
wavacoiwtil the prominent care and thought of the President ancf Faculty, 

' th€ ;:; : ; 1U - ' , wil1 ** ra ade to duly impress all students with tbe supe 
rwnty of high morai character to mere intellectual attainments 



v 



Auburn Ala., July 1 Oth 1884, 



Wm. Lkroy Broun, 

President. 



V 

Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



1884 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. I 
Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama *h [microform] I 

► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute f 

► 10 24610 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Auburn, Alabama f 

► 11 246 10 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical. College of 
Alabama 1 

► 12" 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama I 

Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, 1 

21 v. ; *c 21 cm. I 

Annual I 

1872-73-1892-93. 1 

Title varies slightly. I 

Microfilm. *m 1873-1893. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama ±x Curricula ±x 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue and 
circular of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1 

► 23 785 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project I 



ALABAMA D OL v TIiCHMIC INSTITUTE 
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C^i 2^- AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 3 

BA^KSDALE 

An act to establish a college at Auburn, in Lee county, Alabama, 

for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts, pursuant to 

an act of the Congress of the United States, approved February 

26, 1872. 

Sec. 1. Beit enacted by the General Assembly of Alabama, That there be and 
hereby is established at Auburn, in Lee county, Alabama, a college for the benefit of 
agriculture and the mechanic arts, whose leading object shall be, without excluding 
other scientific and classical studies and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as relate to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in conformity to an 
act of the congress of the United States entitled an act donating public land to the sev- 
eral States and territories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture 
and the mechanic arts, approved July 2d, eighteen hundred and sixtv two, undfer such 
regulations as may be hereafter provided. 

SEC. 2. Be it further enacted, That the "East Alabama male college", a body corpo- 
rate, created by the laws of Alabama, having by David Clopton, the president, a d 
George P.Harrison,secretary of its board of trustees, made and executed a deed of 
conveyance of the college building lands and appurtenances thereto attached, as des- 
cribed and set forth in said deed, to the State of Ataba ua. for the purpose therein 
shown, bearing date of the 17th. day of February, eighteen hundred and seventy- 
two, said conveyance is hereby accepted for the purposes therein set forth on the part 
of the State. v 



An act in relation to the Agricultural and Mechanical College of 

Alabama, approved February 26, 1872. 

Sec. 8. Be it further enacted, That the interest, income and proceeds arising from 
the investment of the funds created by the sale of lands or land script, granted by the 
Congress of the United States to this State for the promotion of agricultural and mechan- 
cal arts, shall be paid to the treasurer of said college as the same may accrue and be 
needed for the purposes of said agricultural and mechanical college, on the order of the 
said treasurer upon the auditor of the State, who shall draw his warrant on the treas- 
urer^ the State for the same. ■ 



An act to establish a department of Agriculture for the State of 

Alabama, approved February 23, 1883. 

Sec. 17 Be it further enacted That for the purpose of establishing an experimental 
farm or station, one-third of the net proceeds annually accruing from the sale of tags as 
hereinbefore provided shall be paid to the Treasurer of the Agricultural ani Mechani- 
cal College, on the approval of the Governor, to be disbursed under the direction of the 
Board of Trustees of said institution, for the development of the Agricultural and Me- 
chanical Departments of said college; Pninded, the trustees of said college shall cause 
to be made at such college all analyses of fertilizers that may be required under the 
provisions of this act without any charge therefor; And provided further, That the Trus- 
tees shall ;establish and maintain an agricultural experimental farm or station, 
whre careful experiments shall be. made in scientific agriculture, re-- 
sults of whi^h, together with other needed information shall be .furnished the Com- 
missioner of Agriculture for publication in his monthly bulletins and annual re- 
ports. 



207871 



.~- ,*.._. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



His Excellency, E. A. O'NEAL, 


President, 


ex-officto. 


Hon. SOLOMON PALMER, Superintendant of Educ-.tion, 


ex-officio. 


Hon. C. C. LANGDON, 


term expire* 1887. 


Mobile. 


Hon. W. H. BARNES, 


term expires 1887. 


Opelika. 


Hon. H. D. CLAYTON, 


term expires, 1887. 


Clayton. 


Hon. JONATHAN HARALSON, 


term expires, 1889. 


Selma. 


Hon. R. F. LIGON. 


term expires, 1889. 


Tuskegee. 


Hon. JOHN W. BISHOP, 


term expires, 1889. 


Talledega. 


Hon. J. G. GILCHRIST, 


term expires, 1891. 


Montgomery. 


Hon. M. L. 8TANSEL, 


term expires, 1891. 


Carrollton. 


Hon. J. N. MALONE, 


term expires, 1891. 


Athens. 



E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. 

F. M. REESE, Secretary. 



• X 



.. FACULTY AND OFFICERS- 



-0OXK0- 



WM. LEROY BROUN, M. A., LL. D., 
President and Professor of Natural Philosophy. 

J. T. DUNKLIN, A. M., LL. D., 

N Prof essor of Latin Language and History. 

WM. C. STUBBS. A. M., 

Professor of Oeneral and Agricultural Chemistry. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELti, Jr.. M. E v Ph. D., 
Professor of Natural History and Geology. 

GEN. J. H. LANE, C. E.. A M., 
Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

J. S. NEWMAN, 
Professor of Agriculture and Director of the Experiment Station. 

C. C. THACH, B. E., 
Professor of Modern Languages and Englfeh Literature. 



Professor of Practical Mechanics. 

MAJ. T. H. FRAZER, B. E. ? 
Commandant and Instructor in Mathematics and Languages. 

W. L HUTCHINSON, B. S., 
Assistant in Laboratory. 

B. B. ROSS, A.B.. 
Assistant in Laboratory. 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D., 

Furgeon. 

C. C. THACH, 

Recording Secretary. 

P. H. MSLL, JR.. 
Corresponding Secretary. 

E. T. GLENN, 
Librarian. 



*. To be filled. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 

The leading object of this College is to teach the principles and 
the applications of science. 

It does not undertake to teach any special handicraft or manual 
skill in any art, but in the short time a student is under its in- 
fluence, it will endeavor lo subject him to the exact and accurate 
training of science discipline, giving prominence in its instruction to 
the sciences and their applications so far as the facilities at its dis- 
posal will permit. 

The essential discipline obtained by an accurate and critical 
study of languages is not neglected. All students are required to 
study the English language in each course of study for a degree, 
thus giving it special prominence. The Latin, French and Ger- 
man languages are taught, and opportunity for their study is of- 
fered to students in any course. In the Latin-Science course they 
are required for a degree. 

By the College thus, in fact, becoming a distinctive School of 
Industrial Science, or Polytechnic Institute, work of great value 
to the youth of the state may be done in fitting them by a thorough 
Science-discipline for the successful and honorable performance of 
the responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline of the 
students in endeavoring to train them to habits of accurate scientific 
thought and thus qualify them for the duties of life, whatever their 
vocation may be, their moral and christian training will always 
constitute the prominent care and thought of the President and 
Faculty. ■ - ' . 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and Natur- 
al Sciences with their applications; Agriculture, Mechan : cs, As- 
tronomy, Mathematics, Engineering, Drawing, English, French, 
German and Latin Languages, History and Political Economy. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to offer a 
liberal and practical education as a preparation for the active pur- 
suits of life. 



M 



*ri 



AGRICULTURAL Alfa) MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR 

INSTRUCTION. 



The college now possesses tacilities for giving instruction in 
the applied sciences ifi the following departments: 

I— IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres and is supplied with a limited num- 
ber of illustrative specimens of stock of select varieties. 

By act of thcLegislature the office of the Commissioner of Ag- 
riculture and the Experiment Station for the state^of Alabama are 
located at Auburn. The Professor of Agriculture is also Director of 
the Experiment Station, and the Professor of Chemistry is State Chem- 
ist whose duty it is to analyze fertilizers for the benefit of the gen- 
eral agricultural interests of the state. 

This public work done at Auburn in behalf of the agricultural 
and industrial interests of the state affords to students an unusual 
opportunity to become familiar with its agriculture, its defects and 

remedies. 

The Experiment Station is not a model farm, but a place where 
experiments and scientific investigations in agriculture are made tit 
the public expense for the common good, and where the young 
men at the college receive instruction in the methods applied. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in the field, 
garden, conservatory, ^lock-yard etc., where lectures are delivered 
in presence of the objects discussed. 

il— IN PRACTICAL MECHANICS. 

The Mechanic Art Laboratory will be used as an auxiliary in ii - 
dustrial education, to instruct in the arts that constitute the founda- 
tion of various industrial pursuits, and thus aid in giving mentally 
and manually, in theory and practice, that sound education that will 
in a measure qualify a young man to enter upon one of the associa- 
ted industries; that education which comes of training the eye and 
the hand as well as the mind, and tends to associate skilled 
manual and mental labor. This Laboratory will be equipped and 
ready for the reception of students by the opening of the next session- 
It will be located in a commodious hall 90 by 50 feet, and be pro 
vided with a steam engine, machines, and tools, useful for instruc- 
tion. 



y^mmmmmmmmmm_ 



8 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

The labor performed by the students will be instructive in charac- 
ter as in any other college laboratory, and the classes will be taught 
in sections under the supervision of a competent professor. There 
will be no attempt to teach students skill in constructing special arti- 
cles of commercial value, but all exercises will be systematically 
arranged for purposes of education. 

III-IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY, 

The Chemical Laboratory is well supplied with apparatus and 
facilities for instruction in Chemistry. It is provided with gas and 
water, a steam boiler for heating etc. , filtering pumps and six an- 
alytical balances etc., with working tables for thirty students. 

It is situated in the first story of the main building and occupies 
six rooms, one for special agricultural analysis, besides two 
small balance rooms. 

IV— IN PHYSICS. 

This department is now having valuable additions made to its ap- 
paratus, in Electricity, Magnetism, Heat etc. There has recently 
been added a Toepler-Holtz Electric machine, Gramme ma- 
chine, Rueprecht's Physical Balance, Jamin's magnets, etc., 
with the necessary apparatus for an elementary physical laboratory. 

V— IN BOTANY. 

Besides the preserved specimens of plants, grasses etc., this depart- 
ment is provided with Auzoux's beautiful Clastic models of seeds 
and flowers for teaching Botany. The Botanical Laboratory is pro- 
vided with tables and ten Beck's microscopes for the use of the 
students. 

VI— IN -MINERALOGY AND GEOLOGY. 

In this department the collections for illustration are quite exten- 
sive embracing more than 20,000 specimens all well arranged in 
glass cases. 

» 

VII— IN ENGINEERING, PURVEYING, ETC. , * 

This department is well supplied with apparatus,, having recently 
had several valuable additions n,ade to its equipment, with which 
all important field work is taught. 




AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

vm—IN DRAWING. 

All the students in college are required to ta/Ke 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as well aTV 
train the eye and hand to accuracy ot observation and execution. 
Well lighted drawing rooms are provided with suitable tables. 
For the advanced students there are individual tables adjustable 
to different heights and angles of inclination. 

ix-IN PRINTING AND TELEGRAPHY. 

The printing office is supplied with a new Gordon Press, differ- 
ent fonts of type, and stands for twelve students. In the same 
room are the instruments for teaching Telegraphy. 

x -MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity with the act 
of Congress. Students receive the benefit of regular military drill, 
and in addition, the military system is used as a means of enforc- 
ing discipline and securing good order, promptness and regularity 
in the performance of academic duties. 

MANUAL LABOR 

No manual labor is required of students but that which is educa- 
tive in its character and is a part of the scheme of education as de- 
veloped in the different laboratories of chemistry, physics, mechan- 
ic arts etc. Hence there is no opportunity at this college for a 
student to earn money by his labor. He should come prepared to 
devote all his time and energy to his academic duties. 

THE COLLEGE BUILDING. 

This is a handsome well constructed brick building one hundred 
and sixty by seventy-five feet, containing in all thirty-eight rooms. 

This building is not used for dormitories for students, but is ex- 
clusively appropriated for purposes of instruction. It contains the 
lecture rooms and offices of the professors, the library, the labora- 
tories, cabinets, assembly room, printing office and two large well 
furnished society halls with their library and committee roo;i)3. 

All the lecture rooms are provided with modern college furni- 
ture. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two story building ninety by fifty feet, recently con- 
structed. The second storv is the audience hall and for com- 
mencement and other public occasions. 

The first story is appropriated to the Mechanic Art Laboratory. 



.J 



j/ 



Catalogue of Students. 



FOR THE SESSION 18e$4-'85. 



ABREVIATIONS. 

Aa Agriculture. L. Sc I^tin Science. 

Eng Engineering. Sp.. Special Course . 

Genl General Course for Students of Third and Fourtb Classes. 

UNDERGRADUATES. 

FIRST CLASS. N 

NAME. RESIDENCE. COURSE. 

Allen, James Madison. Montgomery county. Eng. 

Andrews, William Thomas Mobile county. Eng. 

Collier, Robert Edward Lee. Lee county. Eng. 

Penn, Walton Thomas. Chambers county. Ag. 

Thach, Robert Henry. Limestone county. Eng. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Allison, Gilmer Alexander. Lee county. Ag. 

Boozer, Henry West. Georgia. Ag. 

Burton, Benjamirf Sullivan. Georgia. Eng. 

Capps, Luther Martin. Henry county, Ag. 

Carter, Julius Caesar. Montgomery county. Ag. 

Howell, Lawson Franklin. Georgia. Ag. 

McCrory, James Thomas. Georgia. Ag. 

Mclntyre, Erastus Stonume. Conecuh county. * Eng. 

Morgan, James William, Jr. Lauderdale county. Eng. 

Newman, Clifford Lewis, Lee county. Ag. 

Pace, M. Downer. Georgia. Eng. 

Perry, Frank Howard. Lee county L. Sc. 

Pitts, Sterling Chambers. Russell county. Eng. 

Ross, Charles Hunter. Lee county. Eng. 

Samford, William Hodge. Lee county. Eng, 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



11 



Simmons, Robert Jasper Hogue. Dale county. 



Smith, Robert Billups. 
Spratling, Leckinski Ware. 
Tillman, Henry Young. 
Varner, Charles Monroe. 
Weaver, Dudley Saunders. 
Whitfield, Augustus Foscue. 
Wilkinson, Levi Washington. 
Zellars, Thomas Peter. 



Chambers county. 
Chambers county. 
Georgia. 

Chambers county. 
Tennessee. 
Marengo county. 
Dale county. 
Georgia. 



THIRD CLASS. 



Alexander, Arthur John. 
Allen, Vassar Lyle. 
Armstrong, Henry" Clay Jr. 
Barclay, Alexander CambpeU. 
Bates, Wilson Allen. 
Bennett, Robert Love. 
Blalock, George Zadock. < 

Bradford, John Nunn. 
Daughtry, Claudius Isador. 
Gordon, Elgee Kingsbury. 
Harris, Thomas Winston. 
Holland, Orlando Monroe. 
Hollings worth, Edward Tracy. 
Huguley, George Abner. 
Jones, Thomas Hugh. 
Lamar, George Holt, 
Lawson, Oswell Thos. Crawford. 
Lloyd, Edward Read. 
Lqng, Jesse Locke, 
Newman, Wilson Herbert. 
Oates, James Jethro. 
Persons, John William. 
Pratt, William Luther. 
Reese, James Simpson. 
Sauder, Albert. 
Sauder, Oscar, . 
Schowalter, Mack Reynolds. 
Slaton, Charles C. 
Wooley, Andrew Feaster. 



Mobile county. 
Montgomery county. 
Lee county. 
Lawrence county. 
Georgia. 
Lee county. 
Georgia 
Lee county, 
Lee county. 
Louisiana. 
Randolph county. 
Lee county. 
Etowah county, 
Georgia. 
Lee county* 
Lee county. 
Georgia. 
Lee county. 
Russell county. 
Lee county. 
Mobile county 
Lee county. 
Bibb county. 
Florida, 
Texas, 
Texas. 

Mobile county. 
Elmore county . 
Georgia. 



I 



L.Sc. 
L. Sc. 
L. Sc. 

Ag. 
Ag- 
Ag. 
Eng. 
Ag.. 
Ag- 

GenL 
Genl 
GenL 
Genl. 

Sp. 
GenL 
Genl. 

Sp. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 

Sp. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 

Sp 
Genl- 
Genl. 

Sp: 
Sp. 
Sp. 
Sp. 
Gfnl. 



12 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



FOURTH CLASS. 






Alien, John Pendergrass. 
Armstrong, Britain Dixon. 
Bedell, Howard Alburn 
Boyd, Thomas Jackson. 
Branch, Benjamin Evans. 
Bridges, Nathaniel Columbus, 
Broun, George Fleming. 
Brown, John Tee. 
Burnett, Jesse Bell, 
Gary, Joseph Milton. 
Cochran, Edmond Collins. 
Crawford; Abednego Jackson. 
Drake John Hodges Jr. 
Gay, Edward Wright. < 
Glover, M ; lton. 
Hardin, John Wesley. 
Jordan, Henry Asbury. 
Kent, Thomas Joshua. 
Klie, Preston Clark. 
Lee, George Forbes. 
Levy, Lionel Clarence. 
Lloyd, Andrew Manly, 
Mason, James Monroe. 
McMillan, William Wiley. 
Nonnenmacher, Eugene Louis 
Oates, John Glaborne. 
Oliver Arthur Wesley, 
Oliver, Claude Lee. 
Orr, Frederick Burleson. 
Phillips, William Russell. 
Pittman, Joseph Jasper. 
Rives, Robert Glenn. 
Robertson, Charles Meachin. 
Smith, Otis Oliver. 
Stubbs, Jefferson Dunbar. 
Taylor,'Samuel Oliver. 
Tharpe, Thomas Killen. 
Torbet, Lonnie Luellyn. 
Walker, Thacker Vivian. 



Lee county. 
Lee county, 
Lee county. . 
Lee county. 
Bullock county. 
Georgia. 
Lee county, 
Texas. 
Georgia. 
Bullock county. 
Mobile county. 
Lee county. 
Lee county. 
Montgomery county. 

Georgia. 
Lee county. 
Autauga county. 
Russell county. 
Marengo county. 
Lee. county. 
Georgia. 
Lee county. 
Lee county. 
Russell county. 
Perry county. 
Mobile county. 
Lee county. 
Lee county. 
Morgan county. 
Georgia. 

Tallapoosa county 
Montgomery county 
Montgomery county. 
Lee county. 
Virginia. 

Montgomery, county 
Georgia. 
Russell county. 
Bullock county. 



Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 

Sp. 
Genl. 

Sp. 
Genl. 
Genl 
Genl. 
Genl. 

Sp. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl 
Genl. 



Sp. 
Genl. 
Genl. 

Sp. 

Sp. 

Sp. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 
Genl. 

Sp. 

Sp. 
Genl. 
Genl. 

Sp. 

Sp. 
Genl. 
Genl. 

Sp. 

Sp. 

Sp. 
Genl. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



18 



SUB SECTION FOURTH CLASS. 



Andrews, William Thomas. 
Bedell, Paul. 
Broughton, Louis Edward. 
Clanton, William Howard. 
Duke, Edwin Walton. 
Duke, Thomas William. 
Dunklin, Joseph. 
Glenn, Charles Bowles. 
Gordon, Douglas Francis, 
Greene, Zachariah. 
Guice, Thomas E. 
Jackson, William Carson. 
Kelly, Reuben. 
Lea, Sumter Jr. 
Mastin, Thomas Benton. 
McDavid, William Henry. 
Moseley, Clay Augustus. 
Powers, Edward Clyde. 
Reynolds, Walter Augustus. 
Seibert, William, 
Sellers, Rufus Frederick. 
Taylor, Hugh McGehee. 
Williams, James Lee. 



Georgia. 

Lee county. 

Butler^county. 

Macon county. 

Chilton county* 

Macon county. 

Butler countv. 

Lee county. 

Louisiana. 

Lee county. 

Conecuh county, 

Lee county 

Russell county. 

Dallas county 

Montgomery county. 

Florida. 

Perry county. 

Lee county. 

Lee county. 

Lowndes county. 

Bullock county t 

Montgomery county 

Dallas county. 



First Class 
Second Class 
Third Class 
Fourth Class 
Sub Fourth 



RECAPITULATION. 



5 

24 
29 
39 
23 



Total 



120 



MILITARY ORGANIZATION 



1884-'85. 

W. L. Broun, President. 
Maj. T. H. Frazer, Commandant. 
J. H. Drake, M. D., Surgeon. 



CADET OFFICERS. 

STAFF. 

R. H. Thach, Jr., Adjutant. G. A. Allison, Sergeant Major, 

C. H. Ross, Color Sergeant. F. H. Perry, Ordnance Sergeant. 






COMPANY A, 

Captain, R. E. L. Collier. 
1st. Lieut., W. T. Andrews. 
2nd. Lieut., B. S. Burton. 
1st. Sergt. , S. C. Pitts. 
2nd. Sergt., D. S. Weaver. 
3rd. Sergt. , J. T. McCrory. 
1st. Corp., J. S. Reese. 



COMPANY B, 

Captain, J. M. Allen. 
1st. Lieut., T. P. Zellers. 
2nd. Lieut., C. L. Newman. 
1st. Sergt., L. W. Spratling. 
2nd. Sergt., R. B. Smith. 
3rd. Sergt., J. W. Morgan, Jr. 
1st. Corp., E. T.; Hollingsworth. 



COMPANY C. 

Captain, W. T. Penn. 
1st. Lieut , L. F. Howell. 
2nd. Lieut., 

1st. Sergt., L. W. Wilkinson. 

2 ad. Sergt., L. M. Capps. 

3rd. Sergt-, R. J. H. Simmons. 

1st. Corp., E. K. Gordon. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



15 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission must be of good moral character and not 
less than fourteen years of age. To enter the fourth class the apli- 
cant should be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination in the 
following subjects: 

1. Geography and History of the United States. 

2. EngUsh.—(a.)An examination uponsentencescontainingincor- 

rect English, (b.) A composition giving evidence of satisfactory 
proficiency in spelling, punctuation, grammar, and division into 

paragraphs. , 

The subject of composition for 1885-86 will be taken from one cl 

the following works: Scott's Lady of the Lake, or Ivanhoe, David 

Copperfield. A 

3. Mathematics-(a) Arithmetic, including Fundamental Opera- 
tions; Common and Decimal Fractions; Denominate Numbers, 
the Metric System; Percentage, including Interest and Dis- 
count; Proportion; Extraction of the Square and Cube Koots. 
(b)— Algebra, to Quadratic Equations, as in Olney s Complete 

Algebra. ,. , i 

The applicant will derive great advantage from having studieue- 

mentarv geometrical drawing, as in Kitchener's Geometrical *ote 

Book. rrmin 

For admission to the Latin-Science courte a satisfactory exac- 
tion willbe required in the following additional subjects: Latin 
Grammar (Allen and Greenough), Latin Lemons (Leightcns), 
Ceasar (4 Books.) 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Monday and Tuesday pre- 
ceding the opening in September, at which all applicants sho uld 

F I^upon examination, an applicant should be found deficient hi 
any of the required studies, he will be assigned to a course of P^ 
iJinary training, provided that his att ainmen s ,n he Engb* 
branches are such that he may, with one years training, be pre 
pared for the studies of the Fourth Class. : mmfflia telv to 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will jJJ^SJSK 
the President No student will be admitted to a rectation .4 any 
class previous to matriculation. 



f 



urn m .-ii«. r 



,-••*• 



■MM 






71 



16 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

SUBCOLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 

For students who are not prepared for the regular College classes 
this department is regularly organized under the direction of an ex- 
perienced instructor. These students are subject to the discipline of 
the College, 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen recitations 
per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in 
laboratory work, drawing and military drill. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

All students are advised to enter one of the regular prescribed 
courses for a degree. 

Those who are not candidates for a degree will be permitted to take, 
with the advice of the Faculty, and the written approval of their 
parents or guardians, such subjects as they may prefer and for which 
they may be qualified. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION- 

There are three Degree Courses, each leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science, and requiring four years for its completion. 

I.-COURSE IN AGRICULTURE AND CHEMISTRY. 
n.-COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING 
III.— LATIN SCIENCE COURSE. 

There are also two Partial Courses, each requiring two years 

for its completion. 

IV.-TWO YEAR'S COUR3E IN AGRICULTURE ^ 

V.-TWO YEAR'S COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

Course I. includes theoretical and practical instruction in those 
branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and is especially 
adapted to those who propose to devote themselves to agricultural 
or chemical pursuits. 



■ 



\ 



i 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 



17 



Course II. includes the principles and applications of the 
sciences that directly relate to civil and mechanical engineering, 
and is adapted to those who expect to enter the profession of en- 
gineering. 

Course III. has been arranged to give a general and less technical 
education in subjects of science and language to meet the wants of 
those students who have selected no definite vocation in life, as 
well as of those who do not now propose to enter a technical profes- 
sion but who propose ultimately to engage in some commercial or 
manufacturing business. 

Courses IV. and V. have been arranged for the benefit of those 
students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, are not able to 
continue at college four years and take one of the regular degree 
courses. 

Students who complete either of these two-year courses, will, on 
passing a satisfactory examination, receive certificates indicating 
their attainments. 



/ 



18 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



I.— COURSE IN AGRICULTURE AND CHEMISTRY. 



FOUHTH CLASS. 



\ 



Second Term. 
5. English. 

2 History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physiology. 

5. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

THIRD CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 

2. .Botany, 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture, 
5, Drawing. 

Military Drill. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. Euglish, 

3. Physics, 

4. Chemistry, 



First Term. 
3, English, 

2, History. 
5. Mathematics. 
5, Elementary Physics, 
5. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 

First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. Chemistry. 
3, Agriculture. 
5. Drawing. 

Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 

3. Physics. 

4. Chemistry, 
2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture, 

2. Natural History, (laboratory) 2. Natural History, (laboratory,) 
1. Tactics. 1, Tactics. 

5. Drawing. - 5. Drawing. 
Chemical Laboratory. Chemical Laboratory. 
Military Drill. * Military Drill. 



First Term. 

2. English Literature, (a). 

3. Mechanics, (a) 

3. Natural History. 
2. Agriculture, 

4. Industrial Chemistry, 
1. Tactics. 

Chemical Laboratory. 



FIRST CLASS. 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy, (a) 

3. Astronomy, (a) 
3. Natural History, 
2. Agriculture. 

4 Ind.istria. Chemistry, 
1. Tactics. 

Chemical Laboratory. 



Agriculture or Analytical Chemistry may be substituted for the subjects marked 
(a) in the First Class.l 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COT,LEGE. 



13 



II— COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 



First Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

5, Elementary Physics. 

5 Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 



FOURTH CLASS. 

^econd Term. 
5. English. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physiology. 
5. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill 



First Term, 
3. English. 

2. History, 
5, Mathematics. 

3. Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture, (a.) 
5. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 



THIRD CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture, (a.) 
5. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory, 
Military Drill. 



First Term. 
3. English, (a). 

£, Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

5 /Engineering. 

5. Drawing, 

1, Tactics. 

Military Drill. 



SECOND CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English, (a.) 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

5. Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Tactics. 

Military Drill. 

FIRST CLASS. 



First Term. 

2. English Literature, (a.) 

3. Mechanics. 

2. Natural History. 

3 Mathematics. 

5. Engineering. 

5, Drawing. 

1. Tactics. 

French or German may be substituted 



Second Term. 

2. Political Economy, (a.) 

3, Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 

1. Tactics. 

for the subjects marked (a). 



20 



AGRICULTURAL AWD MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



HI.— LATIN-SCIENCE COURSE. 

FOURTH CLASS, 



First Term. 
3. English, 
2. History. 
5. Latin. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 



Second Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Latin. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
* Military Drill. 



First Term. 
5. Latin. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Chemistry. 
5. Drawing. 

Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. Latin. 

2, Natural History. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Tactics. 

Military Drill. 

First Term. 
2 f English Literature. 
3 Mechanics. 
2 t Natural History. 
5. French. 

4. German. 
!• Tactics. 



THIRD CLASS, 

Second Term. 
5. Latin. 

2. Botany. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Chemistry. 
5. Drawing. 

Military Drill. 

SECOND CLASS, 

Second Term. 
3. English. ' 
3. Physics. 
5, Mathematics. 
3. Latin. 

2. Natural History. 
5. Drawing. 

1. Tactics. 
Military Drill, 

FIRST CLASS, 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy. 

3. Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 
5. French. 

4. German. 
1. Tactics. 



:**> 



French or German may be substituted for Latin in^the Second Class. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



21 



IV.— TWO-YEAR'S COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

FIRST YEAR. 



I 



First Term. 
3. English. 

2. Algebra. 

3. Geometry. • c ^ r 
5. Elementary Physics. 
3. Agriculture. 
5 Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
. Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 

3. Geometry. 

3, Chemistry. 

5, Agriculture. 

2. Natural History. 

5. Drawing. 

Military Drill. 



Second Term. 
5. English. 

2. Algebra. 

3. Geometry. 
3. Elementary Physiology. 
2. Botany. 
5. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 
English Composition. 

Trigonometry. 

Surveying. 

Levelling. 
5. Chemistry. 
5. Agriculture. 
2. Natural History. 
5. Drawing. 

Military Drill. 

v v.— TWO- YEAR'S COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term 



First Term. 
3 English. 

2. Algebra. 

3. Geometry. 
5. Elementary Physics. 
5. Drawing, 

. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 



First Term. 
English Composition. 

2. Algebra. 
5. Geomerry. 

3. Physics. 
3. French. 
5. Drawing 



5. N English. 

2. Algebra, 

3. Geotnetry. 

3. Elementary Physiology. 
5. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory, 
Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second lerm. 
English Composition. 

5. Trigonometry. 
3. Physics. 
3. French. 
5. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 



Mechanic Art Laboratory. ^-^^Mllitary Drill. 
Military Drill. 

It is designed to arrange a more elaborate course when the Mechanic Art Labora- 
tory is fully equipped with machinery and tools. 



22 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

President Broun. 

The instruction is given by regular recitations from text- books, 
illustrated by experiments. The first part ot the course is occupied 
with Elementary Rational Mechanics, treated graphically, avoid- 
ing, as far as possible, complex mathematical symbols. 

This is followed by a full discussion of Molecular Mechanics, while 
due prominence is given to principles. Constant reference is made 
to the applications of science. 

In the First Class the subjects studied are Astronomy and Me- 
chanics. In the study of Mechanics in this class, mathematical 
analysis is used. 

Text-Books — Atkinson's Ganotor Daniel's Phvsics, Newcomb's 
Astronomy, Peck's Mechanics. 



LATIN LANGUAGE AND HISTORY 

Professor Dunklin. 

The subjects taught in this Department are the Latin Language 
and History. 

Latin.— The modes of instruction are by translation from the La- 
tin texts into English, and vice versa, orally an J in writing. 

A systematic course of exercises, illustrative of the principles of 
Latin Etymology and Syntax, are carried on in connection with 
the reading of the authors prescribed. 

The progress of the student is valued not so much by the number 
of books read as by his ability to read Latin, and explain the prin- 
ciples of interpretation and construction. 

A course in general History, ancient and modern, is given in the 
Third and Fourth classes, also in Political Economy in the First 
Class. 

LATIN TEXT BOOK8. 

Fourth Class. — Virgil, Composition, Mythology, Ancient Geo- 
graphy. 
Third CLass. — Cicero, Composition (Jones.) 
Second Class. — Horaces, Cicero de Officiis, Latin Composition. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



23 



"S 



Optional Greek. Two years course, three recitation a week; Ele- 
mentary Grammar. Selections from Xendphon & Homer. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

White's Junior Student's Lexicon, Harper's Latin Lexicon, 
Smith's Classical Dictionary and Antiquities, Zumpt's and Madvig's 
Latin Grammars, Ginn & death's Classical Atlas. 



CHEMISTRY. 

Professor, Stubbs. Assistants, Hutchinson and Ross. 

There are two courses in this department. 

I, A general course. \ 

II. A special course in Agriculture and Chemistry. 

I.— GENERAL COURSE. 

This course consists of a series of lectures and recitations, extending 
through the year in Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, fully 
illustrated by experiments. Chemical principles are thoroughly 
explained, together with their application to the various arts and 
industries. Special attention is given to the composition of aoils, 
fertilizers, ores and technical products. In the last half of the 
session, considerable time is spent in Industrial Chemistry. All 
the students oi the Third Clas* pursue this course. 

Text Books, Bloxam's Chemistry, with Professor's notes. 

II.-SPECIAL COURSE IN AGRICULTURE AND CHEMISTRY. 

Students enter upon this course after completing the General 
course of the Third Class, Two years are spent in this course; 
the first in qualitative, the second in quantitative analyses. Besides 
daily recitations, each student devote? at least ten hours a week to 
laboratory work. He is assigned a work table, furnished with 
gas, water and a full set of reagents and necessary apparatus for 

general chemical work. 

Accurate analyses are required and frequent determinations of 

unknown compounds constitute a part of their daily work. 
The First Class also pursues the study of Agricultural Chemistry, 
Text Books— Junior Course in Practical Chemistry (Jones), 

Church's Laboratory Guide and Bollou's Quantitative Analysis 

Johnson's "How Crops" and "How Crops Feed." 



24 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



CHEMICAL LABORATORIES. 

These are well adapted to analytical work. There are six rooms 
and two balance rooms. The work rooms contain thirty work 
tables, each provided with gas and water facilities, a set of reagent 
bottles and necessary apparatus. The lecture room is 40 by 40 
feet in size, and is provided with every facility for illustrating 
lectures by experiments. The furnace is supplied with a boiler, 
which runs the stills, and the water and filter pumps, of the work 

laboratory. 

In the balance rooms are balances made by Oertling, Vferbeck, 

Pickholdt, Troemner and Becker. 

An annual fee of $10, for the use of chemicals in the laboratory, 
is paid by students pursuing the analytical work of K the course in 
Agriculture and Chemistry. . 

STATE LABORATORY AND LABORATORY OF EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Professor Stubbs, State Chemist. Assts., Hutchinson and iloss. 

In this laboratory work is done for the Department ot Agriculture 
and the Experiment Station. Since its establishment up to May the 
first of present year 320 quantitative analyses have been made con- 
sisting of commercial fertilizers, marls phosphates, mucks, iron 
and gold ores, mineral waters and soils. Numerous qualitative anal- 
yses have also been made. 

This laboratory performs the following work: first, analyses of 
commercial fertilizers, minerals, t marls, ores and etc. , for depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

2nd. Analyses for State Experiment Station. 

3rd. Analyses for private parties. 

The Commissioner of Agriculture orders the work done under 1st., 
head, the Director of Experiment Station the 2nd. while a charge 
is made for the 3rd. 






MATHEMATICS, f 

Prof. Smith. 
The general course for the first two years embraces, the first year, 
algebra and geometry, six book.-; sectfnd year, solid and spheri- 
cal ge< mtry. plane a'.d spherical uigonomety, surveying, mensu- 
ration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained — first, mental dicipliae; 
second, a thorough knowledge of the practical applcations. 



s 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



25 



Theoretical and practical instruction is given in the Third Class, 
in farm, town and government land surveying, dividing land, 
mapping, plotting and compulation of areas, etc., also, in the 
taeory, adjustment and use of instruments. 

The Class, in sections of six or eight, devote three Afternoons 
a week, during the second term, to field practice, with compass, 
transit, level, chain and rod. Maps, plans and profiles of field 
work are required in addition to regular work in drawing. Mensu- 
ration includes an extended course in measurements of heights anil 
distances, plane, rectilinear and curvilinear figures, surfaces 
and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, lays the 
foundation for the pure and applied Mathematics of the Mechan- 
ical and Engineering course, and qualif es those who discontinue 
the subject at this point, to go into the field and shop, and do good 
and useful work. 

Analytical Geometry, Descriptive Geometry and Calculus are pur- 
sued in the Engineering course. 

Especial attention is given to their practical applications. During 
the entire course, instruction in text-books is supplemented ^by lect- 



ures. 



Solutions of original practical problems are required of the stu- 
dent, to make him tamiliar with the application of principles, to test 
his knowledge, and make him self-reliant. 



TEXT BOOKS. 



Olney's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Schuylers' Surveying, 
Halstead's Metrical Geometry, Loomis' Analytical Geometry, (new 
edition) Warren's Descriptive Geometry, Loomis' Calculus, (new 
^^klition). 



NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. . 



Prof.Mell. 



Geology and Mineralogy.— These sudjects are studied in the Fall 

Term of the last year. 

-Special attention is given to the Geology of Alabama. The course 
4 is given by text-books and lecturer, illustrated by means ot dia- 



', 



26 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



grams, maps, models and various rocks, fossUiferous and non- 
fossiliferous, to be found in the Geological Cabinet. Attention is 
given to the nature and origin of ore deposits, mineral springs, 
and origin and Geological relations of s ils. 

A systematic arrangement of the Animal Kingdom, in accordance 
with natural affinities, is made a special feature of the instruction. 

Particular attention is also given to insects injurious to vegeta- 
totion, their habits, and the methods best adapted for checking their 

ravages. 

Botany —The student* of the Third Class begin the study of Bot- 
any, and continue it through the Second Term. Analytical work is 
made an important feature. The Class is provided with plants from 
the neighboring fields, and taught how to determine their specific 
names. The work is suffiiciently exhaustive to enable the student, 
after completing the course, to name any of the ordinary weeds 
and grasses that he will encounter in this Section. 

In the Second Class an amount of time is devoted to systematic 
and structural Botany, and to advanced Laboratory work with 
the microscope | in the preparation of specimens showing plant 
structure, sufficient to familiarize the students not only with 
the methods of plant building and cellular organization, 
but also to practice them in detecting the various forms 
of fungi that are injurious to fruits and vegetables A 
Biological Laboratory has been fitted up for the students, 
provided with excellent microscopes of the most improved patterns, 
well constructed tables, and all the necessary chemicals for prepar- 
ing and mounting vegetable tissues. A dark room is attached to 
this laboratory for micro-photographic work. 

The teaching of Botany is greatly facilitated by the use of 
Auzoux complete set of clastic models of plants, imported recently 

from France. 

Physiology.— This subject is taught to the students of the Fourth 
Class, and is completed in the second term of the session. The text is 
illustrated by models and microscopical sections projected on the 
screen. A skeleton, finely articulated, has been provided 
for the use of this class. 

TEXT BOOKS 

Le Conte's Geology, Holders Zoology, Bessey's Botany, Apgara 
Plant Analysis, Martin's Human Body. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



27 



ALABAMA WEATHER SERVICE. 

The United States' Signal Service has established in Alabama a 
State System for collecting meteorological data relating to climatic 
changes. The service is now in successful operation with the cen- 
tral office located at this Institution. Bulletins are issued at the close 
of each month, compiled from reports sent the Director from numer- 
ous stations scattered throughout the State. An opportunity is thus 
offered the students in Meteorology for becoming familiar with the 
system so long successfully operated by the Department at Wash- 
ington. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

Professor Lane. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

The special studies of this Department begin in the Second Class, 

and are as follows: 

Second Class.— Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic 
curves, turnouts, and crossings, levelling, gradients, setting slope 
stakes, excavations, embankments, location and construction of 
common roads and railroads. 

First Class.— Building materials, mortars, cements 
and other uniting materials, preservatives, strength 
of materials, strains, framing, the mechanics and 
construction ot masonry, foundations on land and 
in water, bridges and their construction, roofs and their construc- 
tion, location and construction of common roads and railroads, 
canals and their construction, river and sea coast improvements. 

Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

For practical work, this department has been supplied with two 
transits, one of which has the solar attachment, two enginwstev- 
els, one drainage or farmer's level, two surveyor s ™*V^™f™i 
et compass, one odometer, one pedometer, one Abney ^veland 
clinometer one right angle reflector one sextant one P«*jt« 

tant, one aneroid barometer, patent ^^ n ,^^^^S 
pat/at steel tape,, levelling rod, of different kinds flag staffs etc. 
The library EL also been supplied with books of reference. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Second Class.-Henck's, Field Book for Railroad Engineers 

Gillespie's Roads and Railroads. n , ft n i.: c 0*0;. 

First Class.-Wheeler's Civil Engineering, Von Ott s Graphic t»a. 

ics. 



28 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

DRAWING. 

Drawing in the Third and Fourth Classes, is obligatory on the 
students in all the courses. In the First and Second Classes, only 
the students in Mechanics and Civil Engineering are required to 

draw. 

The Fourth Class receives instruction in graphical drawing and el- 
ementary graphical mechanics. In the Third Class, the principles 
of orthographic and isometrical projections, shades and shadows and 
practical perspective are taught. In the Second Class, the instruc- 
tion embraces orthographic and isometrical drawing, perspective, 
shades and shadows, tinting in India ink and colors, sketches of 
tools and machines, plans, elevations and cross sections of buildings. 

The First Class is taught perspective, topographical drawing 
and drawings of machines, roofs, bridges, etc. Plans, profiles and 
sections of railroad surveys, complete the instruction in this de- 
partment. 

The students in this department, use adjustable tables with black 
walnut tops and iron stands, Schroeder's models, French, German 
and American plates of roofs, bridges, masonry, tools, machines, 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Fourth Class* — Davidson's Linear Drawing, Notes on Graphical 
Mechanics. 

Third Class.. — Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical Perspec- 
tive. 

Second Class, — Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's 
Drawing for Machinists and Engineers, Plates belonging to the 
College. 

First Class. — French, German and American Plates belonging to 
the College. 



AGRICULTURE. 

Prof. Newman, 

Instruction in this department commences wi ' h the Third or Soph- 
omore Class and continues through the Second and First Classes. 
The subject is taught principally by lectures in which it is treated as 
an applied science, making the application of the teachings of the 
natural sciences to the art of agriculture, using the farm of the 
Experiment Station as a laboratory for the practical illustration of 
the lecture room instruction. 



AGBICULTUBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



29 



The classes accompany* the professor (who is also Director of the 
Station), into the field, garden, orchard, vineyard, the green house 
and stock yard, where lectures are delivered in the presence of the 
work in progress, the objects and results of experiments explained, 
the propagation, planting, pruning and cultivation of plants illus- 
trated, and so far as deemed necessary for tho/ough instruction 
manual labor required of the students in any and every department 
of the farm. The principles of stockbreeding are taught in the lec- 
ture room and the practice illustrated on the farm. 

Every principle and theory taught in the lecture room will be 
thoroughly illustrated and exemplified upon the farm which, within 
the next twelve months, will be made complete in all its appointment * 

The First Class will be required to keep accurate records of all work 
done upon the farm including frequent observations of the progress 
of experiments. In a word, they will be required to keep just such 
records of the farm as though they were its propiietors. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

J. S. Newman, Director. 

The State Agricultural Experiment Station is connected with the 

College. 

The farm of the station is adjacent to the College buildings and is 
used by the professor of agriculture to -illustrate his lecture-room 
instruction. Here a great variety of experiments in Agriculture, 
Horticulture, stock breeding and stock feeding will serve not only 
the purposesof instruction to the students but *iD afford valuable 
information to the farmers of the State, many of whom already sho* 
their appreciation of its work by visiting it for the purpose of in- 
specting the experiments in progress. 

Bulletins are issued regularly through the State Department of Ag- 
riculture and widelv distributed over the State by the Commis- 
sioner. 

MODERN LANGUAGES AND ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

Prof. Thach. 

ENGLISH. 

In this department the student will be carried through a sys- 
tematic course of study in the English language and literature. In 



30 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



the courses of study which do not include the ancient classics a 
full course in English is especially important. It is therefore de- 
signed, as much as the time allotted permits to familiarize the 
student by frequent exercises with the standard authors of the 
language. 

The course of study is as follows: 

Fourth Class— Three hours a week, study of Grammar; the 
principles of special and general composition, with frequent brief 
papers illustrating the laws studied. 

Third Class.— Three hours a week, study of style, analysis of the 
selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on literary and his- 
torical themes. 

Second Class.— Three hours a week critical study of English 
classics, Shakespeare, Goldsmith, Milton, Longfellow, Essays. 
. First Class.— Two hours, first term, outlines of general litera- 
ture, history of English literature. 

Weekly ' exercises in declamation are held in the first class. 
Three original orations are required during the year of each student 
in the first and second classes. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

No attempt is made in this department to teach a student to 
speak French and German. The aim is to give such a facility in 
reading these two languages as will afford ready access to the im- 
portant scientific papers in foreign journals. The folio ,ving courses 
are pursued: 

French, first term, Otto's Grammar, part first; exercises in 
writing French; French readings. 

Second Term, Otto's Grammar, part second; French composi- 
tion, Racine's Athalie. * 

Third term, composition ssientific French. 
German first term; Otto's Grammar, part first; exercises in writ- 
ing German. German readings. 

Second term; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell. Otto's Grammar, part 
second. * 

Third term; Scientific German and composition. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

Maj. Frazer, Commandant. 
Military Scienca and Tactic, are required to be taught ia this 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



31 



Institution by law. This law is faithfully carried out, by imparting 
to each student not physically incapacitated to bear arms, practical 
instruction in the School of the Soldier, of the Company and of 
the Battalion, also in Guard Mounting, Inspections, Dress Parades. 
Reviews, etc. The College is provided, by the State, with breech- 
loading cadet muskets, swords and accoutrements. 

The following uniform has been pre scribed for dress, viz., sack 
coat of West Point cadet grey, grey pants/vest and cap, trimmings 
black. A very neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained here 
at about $18. This is less expensive than the usual clothing. All 
students are required to wear this uniform during the term. 

The drills are short, and the mililary duty involves no hardship. 
The Military Drill is a health giving exercise, and its good effects 
in the development of thv physique and improvement of the carriage 
of the cadet are manifest. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. The officers 
are selected for proficiency in drill, deportment and studies. Each 
company is officered by one Captain, one 1st, Lieutenant, one*2nd. 
Lieutenant, with a proper number of Sergeants and Corporals. The 
officers and non-commissioned officers are distinguished by appropri- 
ate insignia of rank. These appointments are conferred by the Presi- 
dent, on nomination of the Commandant, and are continuous unless 
forfeited by abscence or misconduct. 

No military duty is required of the privates of the First Class 
except to drill with the Battalion. 

The First add Second Classes recite once a week in Military 
Tactics. 



POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 

There are two Post-Graduate Degrees -MASTER OF SCIENCE and CIVIL 
ENGINEERING. 

Any graduate of this Coliege, who shall, after graduation, actively 
engage, for at least three years, in literary or scientific work in the 
line of his profession, and who may, by an examination prescribed 
by the Faculty, give satisfactory evidence of sufficient advance 
meat, shall be entitled to a Post-Graduate Degeee. The requisite 
course of study and the nature of the examination may be obtained 
by corresponding with the Faculty. A Post-Graduate Degree 



32 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



also may be obtained by a graduate by one year's residence at the 
College spent in the successful prosecution of such a course of ap- 
plied science as will be prescribed by the Faculty. 

Applicants for Post-Graduate Degrees must matriculate and de- 
posit with the treasurer the amounts of their diploma fees. They 
must also write and present to the Faculty satisfactory theses upon 
some subject pertaining txftheir professions. 

Resident graduates may prosecute the studies in any department 
of the College without payment of regular fees. 

CERTIFICATES OF DISTINCTION 

Will be awarded to the first four students in the different subjects 
of each class, provided their grade is above 90 per cent., and they 
have satisfactorily passed all the regular examinations of that 
session. 



RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are kept by the 
officers of instruction, in a form adapted to permanent preservation. 

From the record a circular or statement is sent to the parent or 
guardian monthly. 



v 



EXAMINATIONS. 

Written recitations or monthly examinations on the studies of 
the month are held at the option of the Professor. 

At the end of each term written or oral examinations, or both, are 
held on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the Faculty, and 
in no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examina- 
tions can be promoted to the next higher class only on satisfactory 
examinations at the opening of next session. 

It is required that every student who euters the college shall re- 
main through the examinations at the end ot the term. Leaves of 
absence and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted 
within six weeks of the examinations, except in extreme cases. 

At stated intervals during the year, all students, except those 
or tne first Class, are required to stand written examinations on 
Geography aud English. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 33 

Examinations for degrees or certificates of proficiency embrace 
the entire subject of study in the course. 

MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. 

Many valuable additions have been made to the various branch- 
68 of this Museum within the past few years. 

Contributions have been received from different States of the 
Union, from England, Italy, France and the Bermuda Islar.ds. 

The Geology of Alabama is well illustrated m ith minerals, fossil- 
iferous and non-fossiliferous rocks from the different formations of 
the State. The Museum is divided into the following departments: 
Mineralogical, Conchological, Geological, Zoological and Botanical. 
Each department is systematically arranged and catalogued for 

study and display. 

The entire collection of the Museum, added to the private Cabi- 
net belonging to the Professor of Natural History, numbers more 
than 30,000 specimens. 

MUSEUM OF AGRICULTURE, 

The Agricultural Museum is intended to illustrate, as iar as pos- 

siole, the agricultural products of this and other countries. It now 

.contains nearly 1,000 specimens, obtained by donations and by a 

system of exchanges with other Agricultural Colleges, illustratu g 

vaneies of soil, cotton, wheat, oats, corn, peas, grasses, etc. 

LIBRARY. 

A room in the College building is appropriated to the Library, but 
the number of books at present is not large. A portion of the recent 
appropriation made by the State Legislature ha<* been used in the 
purchase ot books. For this purpose there is also paid a small an- 

nual fee by each student. ' .. 

The Library is open at stated times, when students are , pemi - 
led to select books according to regulaiions prescribed by the 
ulty. 

PRINTING OFFICE 

The Printing Office is under the charge of Professor Mell who 
assisted by J. P. Allen as foreman, superintends the work -d >to 
class in printing at fixed hours during the week. The Office occu 



_/ 



.> 



:u 



AGRICULTURAL ANT) MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



pies a large room in the College building and has a complete outfi t 
consisting of an excellent Gordon press, with tpnte of type and 
stands for twelve students. It is open each afternoon for practice 
by the cadets. w 

• DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the President and 
Faculty, in accordance with the Code^f Laws and Regulations enac- 
ted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study, and punctuality in attendance on recitations 
anthdl other duties, is required of every .student. 

Students are not allowed to have in their possession weapons 
or arms not issued for the performance of military duty. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Religious services are held every mornifag in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and also to 
attend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. Opportu 
nities are also offered for attending Bible Classes every Sunday. 

YOILNTG MEtf'S CtfRIoflAX ASSOJIATIOtf. 

rhis Association is regularly organize!, and through its weekly 
meeting exerts a wholesome christian influence among the stiw 
dents of the College. 

LOCATION 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, sivty miles from 
Montgomery, directly >>n the line jf the .Vestern jJailrpai ' ; 

The region is high and healthful— 821 feet above tide water. 

By statute of the State, the sale of spirituous liquors and keeping 
saloons of any kind, within five nilse of Auburn are forbidden 



THESIS. 

Each applicant for a regular degree is required to write and subrmt 
to the Faculty a thesis on some subject of immediate relation to the 
studies of his course, and deliver the same at Commencement, if re- 
quired by the Faculty. * 

This thesis must be given to the Professor of English , by the 
first dav of June 



* 



AGRICULTURAL AM' Si f ( j ANICAL COLJ.I GK 35 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

. There are two Literary Societies— the Win and the Weblerian— 
connected with the College, .; i,h iuw a commodious hail, hand- 
spmely fitted up, a library of staiidaid and miscellaneous work*, and 
a reading room. Their weekly exercises add to the facilities atfbrded 
by the College for practice in composition, elocution aud discussion. 
These Societies hold celebrations on the evenings of Thanksgiving 
Day and the 22d of February, and also on Monday and Tuesday 
evenings during- Commencement week. They elect annually, 
with the approval of the Faculty, an orator to represent them at 
the close of the year. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the society, is 
delivered in "the chapel, during Commencement week 
T. H. Frazer, President; T. J. Lamar, Vice President; C. 
C. Thach, Treasurer and Secretary; W. H. Blake of 79, Orator 
forl884-'85. 

ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP 

At its annual meeting, June 24, 1883, the Society established a 
scholarship to be known as the Alumni Scholarship. The fund 
for the scholarship is to be raised by voluntary contributions from 
the members of the society, to be paid annually, and the beneficiary 
is to be elected by 1 he society at its annual meeting in June. The 
Executive Committee, who have charge of this fund for the pres- 
ent year and to whom all communications should be directed, are 
T. H. Frazer and K. H Thach, Auburn, Ala., and C. 

H. Lindsev, Mobile Ala. 

BOARDING. ^ 

Students after selecting their boarding-houses, will not be permit- 
ted to make changes without obtaining permission from the college 
authorities 

EXPENSES. 

TUITION FREE TO ALL CADETS. " 

Iucideutal fee, per term # 5 00 

Library fee, per term ' 

Surgeon's fee per term 

Board, per month, with fuel and light, $12 to 15 00 



36 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



FUNDS OF STUDENTS 

Parents and guardians are requested to deposit with the Treasurer 
of the College ail funds designed for sons or wards, whether for reg- 
ular charges of College fees and board or for any other purpose. It 
is the duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed in his hands, 
and to pay for all expenses incurred by the students, including 
board, uniform, books, etc., only when approved by the President. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

The Academic Year, which is divided into two equal terms, 
commences on the last Wednesday in September, and ends on the 
last Wednesday in June following, which is Commencement day. 
The second term begins on the second Wednesday in February. 



ALUMNI. 



Rev. W. F. Glenn, 
F. 8. Johnson, 
R. D. Lumsden, 
*W. C. Thrash, 
A. F. Wooley, 

Henry Harris, 
W. M. Jones, 
Sidney Lewis, 
R. S. McFarland, 

J. J. F, Kogers, 

J. R. Dowdell, 
Howard Hamill, 

*W. W Moore. 
Rev. W. T. Potillo, 

A. G. Dowdell, 
L. A* Dowdell, 
*A. S. Douglas, 
Leander G. Jackson, 
T. J. Lamar, 
Caleb Lindsey. 
J. R. Motley, 
James D. Mvrick. 
R. C. Persons, 



1860 



1861 



.867 



1868 



1869 



Atlanta, Georgia. 
Macon, Goorgia. 
Crawfordville, Georgia. 
Orrville, Alabama. 
Kingston, Georgia. 

Sparta, Georgia. 
Social Circle, Georgia. 
Sparta, Georgia. 
LaGrange, Georgia. 
Columbus, Georgia. 
Greenville, Georgia 
Perote, Alabama. 

LaFayette, Alabama. 
Jacksonville, Illinois. 

Birmingham. Alabama. 
Lineville, Alabama. 

Opelika, Alabama. 
Monterey, Mexico. 
Louisville, Alabama. 
Longview, Texas. 
Auburn, Alabama, 
Mobile, Alabama, 
Tuskegee. Alabama. 
Midway,, Alabama. 
United States Navy 



s* 



The classes of 1860, 1861, 1867, 1868, 1869 gradnated in the East 
Alabama College. _L_ 



♦Deceased. 



38 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



1872 
R. E. Hurt, 

R 0. Rounsavall, 

W. E, Home, 

L. V. Rosser, 

Rev. E, W. Solomon, 

G. C. Spigener. 

Rev. C. R. Williamson, 

1873 
J. L, Golson, 

W. T. Rutledge, 

P, R. Rutledge, 



R. K. Fitzhugh, 
*P. H. Johnson, 
W H. Moore, 
M. H. Moore. 

Frank C. Dillard, 
*WM. M. Perry, 
*John A. Ratchford, 
Eugene R. RJVers, 



1874 



1875. 



1876 



Rev. M. K. Clements, 

C. T. Hodge, 

S. B. Holt. 

E.M.Oliver, 

F. D. Pe^body, „, , ,., 

J. E/Ruffin. 

P. H. Stow, 
Reese Wilson, 

Rev. Samuel C. Riddle, 
Charles C. Thach, 
John M. Tramm&i; 
William 0. Trammel!,^ 1 

Lemuel G. Dawson, 
Silas C. Dowdeil, 
Tucker H. Frazer. 



i"« 






Salem , Alabama- 
Huntsville, Texas. 
Tan i pa, Florida, 
Colorado. 

Auburn, Alabama. 
Prattville, Alabama. 
Glennville, Alabama 

N*sv Orleans. Louisiana, 
Crawford, Alabama. 
Crawford, Alabama, 

.Augusta Arkansas. 
Montevallo, Alalama. 
Auburn. Alabama. 
Piano, Texas. 

Sherman, Texas. 

Columbus, Georgia, 
LaFayette, Alabama. 
Tallahassee. Florida. 

Colilnsville, Alabama. 

Opelika, Alabama. 

Siiuria, Alabama. 

LaFayette., Alabama. 
Columbus, (Georgia, 
lu/ckford, Alabama. v 
Opelika, Alabama. 
Centre, Texas. 

I Wills Pc.iiit;; Texas 
. Auburn , Alabama. 

Chamber- Coimty, Alabama. 

Chambars County, Alabama. 
1878. 

Ware, Alabama. 

Point Gbupe, Louisia: a. 

Auburn, Alabama 



':'.<"»*■ 



D ceased. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



39 



Robert E. Hardaway, 

George H. Price, 

*IsaacA. Lanier, 

Lee S. Schieflelin, 

Reuben L. Thornton, 

1879. 
Mark ► . Aidie^s, 

Wyatt B, Blake, 

Frank B. Dillard, 

Joshua S. Dowdell 

Oliver C. McGehee, 

Allen B. O'Hara, 

Thomas M. Oliver, 

JohnO. Pinckard, 

J. E. D. Shipp,. 

1880. 
John T. Ashcraft, 

^Benjamin F. Atkinson. 

Samuel B Cantey, 

Samuel Callaway, . 

John S. N. Davis, 

Alva Fitzpatrick, 

E. J. Garrison, 

George R. Hall, . 

Harrison L. Martin, 

Charles B. McCov, 

Robert F. Ousley, 

Henry G. Perry, 

Edgar A. Price, 

George W. Stevens, 

Jabez C. Street, 

Robert Y. Street, 

James J. Sykes, 

Ross E. Thomas, 

Homer B. Urquhart, 

Bartow L. Walker, 

W. U Acree, 
J. Callaway, 



.v. v : *• 



Tuscaloosa, Alabama 
lit] Aili(, It i lessee. 
Huntsville, Alabama. 
Nashville, Tennessee. 
Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 

Greenville, Texas. 
UalVfr leu j, Alabama. 
Whistler, Alabama. 
LaFayette, Alabama. 
Eclectic, Alabama. 
Sandtown, Georgia. 
Opelika, Alabama. 
Clayhatchee, Alabama, 
Cusseta, Georgia. 

Brundidge, Alabama. 
West Point, Georgia. 
Fort Mitchell, Alabama. 
Montgomery, Alabama. 
Gold Hill, Alabama. 
Montgomery, Alabama. 
Lineville, A labama. 
Midway, Alabama. 
Elba, Alabama. 
"Opelika, Alabama. 
Harpers ville, Mississippi. 
Auburn, Alabama. 
Nashville, Tennessee. 
Roanoke, Alabama. 
■«'• fluff's Springs, Alabama. 
< 'Atlanta, Georgia. 
Courtland, Alabama. 
Gadsden, Alabama. 
Birmingham, Alabama. 
Signal Service. 

1881 

Verbena, Alabama. ^ 

Montgomery, Alaba ma. 



*Deceased. 




40 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



0. H. Crittenden, 
J. H. Jeter, 
J. G. Jones, 
W. H, Lamar, Jr., 
J. M. Langhorne, 
J. T, Letcher, 

A. J. Mitchell, 

C. N. Ousley, 

B. B. Ross, 

W. H. Simmons, 

W. D. Taylor, 

J. D. Trammell, 

E. L Van Hoose, 
• 

E. N. Brown, 

Hjr. A. Carden, 

.A M. Clegg, 

W. H. Cui^ringhara, 
^ Bartow Eberhart. 

B. H. Fitzpatrick, 
JT, M. Huirt, 

W. H. Jones. 

Howard Lamar. 

R. F. Ligon, Jr., 

W. W. Pearson, 

J. M. Reid, 

W. H Bruce, 
W. S.Cox, 
W, L. Ellis, 
C L. Gay, 
A. L. Harlan, 
M. L Harp, J*, 

D. B Mangum, 
T. F. Mangum 
A. M, Mcintosh, 

E. M.Pace, 

N. P, D. Samfoiri, 
R. L. Sutton, 



1882 



1883 



Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 
Opelika, Alabama. 
Barachias, Alabama. 
Washington. District Columbia. 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Texas. 

Cedar Keys, Florida. 
Waxahatchie, Texas, 
Auburn, Alabama. 
Newton, Alabama. 
Auburn, Alabama, 
Columbus, Georgia. 
Mexico. 

Union, Springs, Alabama. 
Colorado. 

Memphis, Tennessee. 
Wood's Bluff, Alabama. 
Colutabus, Georgia. 
Montgomery, Alabama. 
Auburn, Alabama. 
Union Springs, Alabama. 
Auburn, Alabama. 
Tuskegee, Alabama. 
Mobile, Alabama. 
Pilot Point, Texas, 

Mill town, Alabama. 
LaGrange, Georgia, 
Pratville, Alabama. 
Montgomery, Alabama. 
Dadevill, Alabama 
Atlanta, Texas. 
Selma, Alaba na. 
Selma. Alabama. 
Dadeville, Alabama 
Independence, Texas. 
Auburr , Alabama. 
East Point, Maiue. / 



T 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



41 



1884 



B. H. Boyd. 
L. R. Bq^. 
R. 8. Corry. 
p. C. Duke. 
T. F. Hardin, 
W. L. Hutchinson, 
J. W. Lockhart. 
D. D. McLeod 
J. B, Bobinson, Jr. 
W. C. Whitaker. 
W. D. Wood, i 



Macon county. 
Macon county. 
Butler county. 
Georgia. 
Lee county, 
Georgia, 

Chambers county, 
Barbour county: 
Tennessee. 
Macon county* 
Autauga county. 



f « 



20787^ 



Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



1885 



nQ 





Rec stat: 


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19970429 


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19970429 


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DtSt : d 


Dates: 1873, 


rl893 1 



*e f *f u *g b *h a *i u *j p I 



OCLC: 36819601 
Entered: 19970429 

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BLvl: s Form: 
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Desc: a SrTp: 

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► 3 043 n-us-al I 

► 4 090 LD271 *b .A76 f 

► 5 090 *b I 

► 6 049 AAAA f 

► 7 110 2 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. I 

► 8 245 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama *h [microform] 1 

► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 10 246 10 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at' Auburn, Alabama 1 . 

► 11 246 10 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of x 
Alabama I 

► 12 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama I 

Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, I 

21 v. ; *c 21 cm. I 

Annual I 

1872-73-1892-93. 1 

Title varies slightly. 1 

Microfilm. *m 1873-1893. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 



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d *b 1873 *c 1893 *d alu *e u *f u +g a 1 

Universities and colleges *z Alabama *x Periodicals. I 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue and 
circular of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1 

► 23 78500 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 

► 24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project 1 



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AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 



LEGISLATION, 



Act of Congress, 

An Act donating Public Lands to the several States and Territor- 
ies which may provide Colleges for the benefit of Agriculture 
and the Mechanic Arts. (Approved July 2d, 1862.) 

Section 4. And be it further enacted, That all moneys derived from the sale of 
the land aforesaid by the States to which lands are apportioned and from the sale of 
land scrip hereinbefore provided for, shall be invested in stocks of the United States, 
or of the States, or some other safe stocks yielding not less than five per centum upon 
the par value of said stocks; and that the moneys so invested shall constitute a perpet- 
ual fund, the capital of which shall remain forever undiminished (except so far as 
may be provided in section fifth of this act), and Jthe interest of which shall be inviol- 
ably appropriated, by each State which may take and claim the benefit of this act, to 
the endowment, support and maintenance of at least one college, where the leading 
object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and includ- 
ing military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture 
and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the Legislature of the States may respect- 
ively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the indus- 
trial classes in the several pursuits and professions in life. 



Acts of the State Legislative. 

An act to establish a college at Auburn, in Lee County, Alabama, 
for the benefit cf agriculture and the mechanic arts, pursuant to 
an act of the Congress of the United States, approved February 
26, 1872 

Sec. 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Alabama, That there be and hereby 
is established at Auburn, in Lee county, Alabama, a college for the benefit of agriculture 
and the mechanic arts, whose leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific 
and classical studies and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning 
as relate to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in conformity to an act of the congress 
of the United States entitled an act donating public lands to the several s tates and terri- 
tories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts, 
approved July 2d, eighteen hundred and sixty two, under such regulations as may be 
hereafter provided 

Sec. 2. Be it further enacted, That the" East Alabama male college" ,a body corporate, 
created by the laws of Alabama, having by DaTid Clopton the president, and George 
P. Harrison, secretary of its board of trustees made and executed a deed of conveyance 
of the college building lands and appurtenances thereto attached, as described and set 

forth in said deed, to the State of Alabama, for the purpose therein shown, bearing date 
of the 17th. day of February, eighteen hundred and seventytwo, said conveyance is 
liereby accepted for the purposes therein set forth on. the part of the Stale. 



C ' * 

, Bft RKSDALE 



& 



/ 



n «•* 



• t» 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



An act in relation to the Agricultural and Mechanical college of Ala 
bama, approved February 26, 1872. 

Sec. 8, Be it further enacted, That the interest, income and proceeds arising from 
the investment of the funds created by the sale of lands or land scrip, granted by the 
Congress of the United States to this State for the promotion of agriculture and the mech- 
anic arts, shall be paid to the treasurer of said college as the same may accrue and 
be needed for the purposes of said agricultural and mechanical college, on the order of the 
said treasurer upon the anditor of the State, who shall draw his warrant on the treas- 
urer of the State for the same. 



An act to amend an act entitled an act to establish a department of 
agriculture for the State of Alabama; approved February 17 Ji. 1885 

Sec. 21 Be it further enacted, That for the purpose of establishing an experimental 
farm or station, one-third of the net proceeds annually accruing from the sale of tags 
as hereinbefore provided, shall be paid to the treasurer of the Agricultural and Mechan- 
ical College on the approval of the governor, to be disbursed under the direction of the 
board of trustees of said institution, for the development of the agricultural and me- 
chanical departments of said college. Provided, the trustees of said college shall cause to 
be made at said college all analyses of fertilizers that may be required under the pro- 
visions of this act, as well as such other analyses as the commissioner of agriculture 
may deem advisable without any charge therefor; and provided further, that the trustees 
shall establish and maintain an agricultural experimental farm or station, where care- 
ful experiments shall be made in scientific agriculture, results of which, together with 
other needed information, shall be furnished the commissioner of agriculture, for pub- 
lication in his monthly bulletin and annual reports. 



3» 



207884 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



His Excellency, E. A. O'NEAL President. 
1 Hon. SOLOMON PALMER, Superintendent of Education. 

Hon. W. H. BARNES, fC CT^ term expires 18ff 



f 



Hon C. C. LANGDON, 



Hon. H. D. CLAYTON. n Y ^ 
Hon. JONATHAN HARALSON, 
\ Hon. R. F. LIGON, 

r 

Hon. JOHN W. BISHOP, 
l Hon. J. G. GILCHRMT, 

] 



K 



Hon. M. L. STANSEL, 
Hon. J. N. MALONE, 



term expires 1887.; 
term expires 1887. 
term expires 1889. 
term Expires 1889. 
term expires 1889? 

term expires 1891. f 

■ 

term expires 1891, , 
term expires 1891. 



ex-officio 
ex-offlcio. 

Opelika. 

Mobile. 

Clayton. 

Selma. 

Tuskegee. 

Talladega. 

Montgomery 

Carrollton. 

Athens. 



E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. 



P. M. REESE, Secretary. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



His Excellency, E. A. O'NEAL President. 


ex-officio 


Hon. SOLOMON PALMER, Superintendent of Education* 


ex-offlcio. 


Hon. W. H. BAENES, K *^ 


term expires 18871 


Opelika. 


Hon C. C. LANGDON, ; . 
Hon. H. D. CLAYTON. n " ^ 


term expires 1887./ 


Mo>ile. 


term expires 1887. 


Clayton. 


Hon. JONATHAN HARALSON, 


term expires 1889. 

tern <W 1889. 

J 
term expires 1880T 


Selma. 


\ Hon. R. P. LIGON, 

r 

Hon. JOHN W. BISHOP, 


Tuskegee. 
Talladega. 


•s Hon. J. G. GILCHRMT, 


term expires 1891. f 


Montgomery 


Hon. M. L. STANSEL, 


term expires 1891, i 


Carrollton. 


4 Hon. J. N. MALONE, 


1 

femeeptm 1891. 

- • ■ 


Athens. 



E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. 

F. M. REESE, Secretary. 



__ 



«i 



w "m 



6 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 



;he leading object ot this College is to teach the principles and 

the applications of science. 

It endeavors to subject each student under its influence to the 
exact and accurate training of science-discipline, giving prominence 
in its instruction to the sciences and their applications so far as the 
facilities at its disposal will permit. 

The essential discipline obtained by an accurate and critical study 
of languages is not neglected. All students are required to study 
the English language in each course of study for a degree, thus 
giving it special prominence. The Latin,French and German Ian- 
guages are taught, and opportunity for their study is offered to stu- 
dents in any course. In the General course they are required fo* 

a degree. 

By the College thus, in fact, becoming a distinctive School of 
Irdustrial Science, or Polytechnic Institute, work of great 
value to the youth of the state will result from fitting them, by a 
thorough Science-discipline for the successful and honorable per- 
formance of the responsible duties of Hie, 

While every Attention is given to the mental discipline of the 
students in endeavoring to train them to habits of accurate scientific 
thought and thus qualify them for the duties of life, whatever their 
vocation may be, their moral and christian training will always 
constitute the prominent care and thought of the Faculty. 

LABOKATOKIES AND FACILITIES FOR 

INSTRUCTION. 

The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory instruc- 
tion in the applied sciences in the* following departments: 

i — in agriculture and horticulture 

The farm contains 226 acres and is supplied with illustrative spec- 
imens of stock of select varieties. 

By act of the Legislature the office of the Commissioner of Ag- 
riculture and the Experiment Station for the state of Alabama are 
located at Auburn. The Professor of Agriculture is also Director 



"i 



: > 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 7 

of the Experiment Station, and the Professor of Chemistry is State 
Chemist, whose duty it is to analyze fertilizers for the benefit of the 
general agricultural interests of the state. 

This public work doneatAubum in behalf of the agricultural and 
industrial interests of the state affords to students an unusual op- 
portunity to become familiar with its agriculture, its defects and 

remedies. 

The Experiment Station is not a model farm, but a place where 
experiments and scientific investigations in agriculture are made at 
V the public expense for the common good, and where the young 
men at the college receive instruction in the methods applied. 

The students of agiiculture accompany the professor in the field, 
garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc, where lectures are delivered 
in presence of the objects discussed. 

II-1ST MECHANIC ARTS 

The Mechanic Art Laboratory is used as an auxiliary in indus- 
trial education, to instruct in the arts that constitute the founda- 
tion of various industrial pursuits, thus aiding in giving mentally 
and manually, in theory and practice, that sound education that 
will in a measure qualify a young man to enter upon some one of 
the associated industries; that education which comes of training 
the eye and the hand as well as the mind, and tends to associate 
skilled manual aud mental labor. This Laboratory is now well 
equipped in the wood-working department. 

It is located in a commodious hall 90 x 50 feet, and is provided 
with a twenty-five horsepower Corliss Engine with indicator, a/ 
planer, circular saw, baud saw, two scroll saws, a buzz planer, l 
twenty stands with lathes, with full sets of lathe and carpentry / 
tools required for instruction. It is designed, as early as practicable, \ . 
to complete the foundry, forge, and machine departments for 
working in metals. 

The work performed by the students is instructive in character 
as in any other college laboratory, the classes are taught in sections 
under the supervision of the professor There is no attempt to 
teach students skill in constructing special articles of commercial 
value, but all exercises are systematically arranged and designed 
for purposes of education. 



> 






■ — ■ — — ■ 






' " ■ ' ■" I ■ 'I I ■ II !■■ 



8 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 

in — IN PRACTICAL CHEMI8TRY. 

The Chemical Laboratory is well supplied with apparatus and 
facilities for instruction in practical Chemistry. It is provided 
with gas and water, a steam boiler for heating, etc., with filtering 
pumps.six analytical balances, and working tables for each stu- 
dent. 

It is situated in the first story of the main building and occupies 
six rooms, one for special agricultural analysis, besides two small 
balance rooms. 

IV — IN PHYSICS. 

This department has had valuable additions made to its appara- 
tus, in Electricity, Magnetism, Heat, etc. There has recently been 
added a Toepler-Holtz Electric machine, Gramme machine, Kue- 
precht's Physical Balance, Jamin's magnets, etc., with the necessary 
apparatus for an elementary physical laboratory. 

V — INBOTANY. 

Besides the preserved specimens of plants, grasses etc., this de- 
partment is provided with Auzoux's beautiful Clastic models of 
seeds and flowers for teaching Botany. The Botanical Laboratory 
is provided with tables and ten Beck's microscopes for the use of 
the students. 

VI— IN MINERALOGY AND GEOLOGY. 

In this department the collections for illustration are quite ex- 
tensive embracing more than 20,000 specimens all well arranged 
in glass cases. »"gcu 

Vn-IN ENGINEERING, SURVEYING,\tC. 

This department, having recently had valuable' additions made 
to its equipment is now well supplied with instruments, with whiS 
all important field work is taught. 

Vm— IN DRAWING. 

All the students in the lower classes are required to take drawing 
a study which tends to discipline the mind as well .. ^ ♦ • 7' 

^7 g , r00m t "• PTOVided With suitaU e taWes. For he ^ 
vanoed students there are individual tables adjustable i*fta£ 
heights and angles of inclination. ^tterent 



_ 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 9 



IX.--IN PRINTING AND TELEGRAPHY 

The printing office is supplied with a new Gordon Press, different 
fonts of type, and stands for twelve students. In the same room 
are the instruments for teaching Telegraphy. 

X— IN MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity with the act 
of Congress. Students receive the benefit of regular military 
drill, and in addition, the military system is used as a means of enforc- 
ing discipline and securing good order, promptness and regularity 
in the performance of academic outies. 

This department is under the charge of Lieut. M. C. Richards 
2nd Artillery U. S. A. 

It has recently been supplied with new cadet muskets and 
accoutrements for the corps, and for artillery practice, with two 
three inch rifled guns, carriages and limbers. 



THE COLLEGE BUILDING 

This is a handsome well constructed brick building one hundred 
and sixty by seventy five feet, containing in all thirty -feight rooms. 

This building is not used for dormitories for students, but is appro- 
priated for purposes of instruction. It contains the lecture rooms 
and offices of the professors, the library, the laboratories, cabinets, 
assembly room, printing office and two large well furnished socie- 
ty halls with their library and committee room*. 

All the lecture rooms are provided with modern college furni- 

i 

ture. 



LANGDON HALL. 

♦ 

This is a two story building ninety by fifty feet, recently con- 
structed. The second story is the audience hall used for commence- 
ment and other public occasions. 

The first story is appropriated to the Mechanic Art Laboratory. 



-**- 



1 ."■ 



— 



"^ 



Catalogue of Students. 



FOR THE SESSION 1885-'86. 



C. & Ag.. 
Eng 



ABREVIATJONS- 

Chemistry and Agriculture. 

Engineering. 



Gen General Course, 

Sp Special Course. 



UNDERGRADUATES. 



FIRST CLASS. 



NAME. 

Allison, Gilmer Alexander. 
Burton, Benjamin Sullivan. 
Capps, Luther Martin. 
Howell, Lawsou Franklin. 
Newman, Clifford Lewis. 
Persons. Frank Archilous. 
Perry, Frank Howard. 
Pitts, Sterling Chambers. 
Ross, Charles Hunter. 



COURSE. 

C. Ag. 
V Ag. 
C. Ag. 

C. Ag. 

C.Ag. 

Sp. 

C.Ag. 

Eng. 

Eng. 



Simmons, Robert Jasper Hogue Gen. 



Smith, Robert Billups. 
Spratling, Leckenski Ware. 
Weaver, Dudley Sanders 
Wilkinson, Levi Washington 
Zellers, Thomas Peters. 



Gen. 
Gen, 

C.Ag. 
C.Ag. 
C.Ag. 



/ Alexander, Arthur John 

Allen, Vassar Lyle. 
/ Armstrong, Henry Clay Jr. , 

•Barclay, Alexander Campbell, 
Bo/kin, Burwell Lee. 
Davis, William Esley. 
Gordon, Elgee Kingsbury. 



SECOND CLASS. 



Eng. 
C.Ag. 
Sp. 

C. Ag. 
C. Ag. 
C. ,ig. 
C.Ag. 



RESIDENCE 

Lee Co. 

Georgia. 

Henry Co. 

Georgia. 

Lee Co. 



<» 



a 



<< 



Russell Co. 

Lee " 

Dale " 

Chambers " 

Chambers *'■ 

Tennessee " 

Dale " 

Georgia. 



a 



n 



Mobile Co. 
Montgomery- 
Lee 

k Lawrence " 
Lowndes " 
Lee " 
Lousiana. 



^— _ j 



AGRICULTURAL AND MKCIIVNICAL COLEGE 



11 



Jones, Roger ap Catesby. C. Ag, 

Jones, Thomas Hugh. C. Ag. 

Lamar, George Holt. C. Ag. 

Lloyd, Edward Read. C. Ag. 

t*Newman, VViLson Herbert. C. Ag. 

Simmons, Charles Woodward. Gen, 

Woolley, Andrew Feaster. Sp. 

THIRD CLASS. 

Allen, John Pendergrass. 
Armstrong, Britain Dixon. 
Boyd, Thomas Jackson. 
Broun, George Fleming. 
Broun, Henry Lee. 
Clower, John Robertson, 
Cobb, Edward Hunter. 
Cory, Alonzo Francis. 
Crawford, Abednego Jackson 
Drake, John Hodges Jr. , 
Driver, David Miller. 
Foster, Edmund Wiley. 
Glover, Milton. 
Griggs, John. 
Jones, John Cargjll. 
Harris, Eugene x Willis. 
Henderson, Joseph Linton. 
Klie, Preston Clar \ 
Lloyd, Andrew Manly. 
Macartney, Edwir Conway. 
Mason, James Monroe. 
Nelson, William Portie. 
Nonnenmacher, Eugene Louis. 
Oliver, Arthur Wesley, 
Orr, Frederick Burleson. 
Partridge, Thaddens Joseph. 
Persons, Henry Stanford 
Phillips, William Russell. 
Rives, Robert Glenn. 
Samford, Thomas Drake. 



Dallas Co. 
Lee '• 



<t 



<< 



si 



a 



a 



tt 



Dale " 
Georgia. 

Montgomery Co. 
Lee ' 



It 



is 



it 



Virginia. 

Lee Co. 

Macon 

Autauga 

Lee 
•i 



a 
a 

a 



is 

a 



Perry 
Mobile 

Georgia. 

Macon Co. 

Wilcox " 

Lee 

Montgomery 

Marengo 

Lee 

Mobile 

Lee 

' . Dnllus 

Perry 

Lee 

Morgan 

Mobile 

Lee 

Gcoigia. 

Montgomery, Co, 

Lee " 



(4 

a 
s . 
it 
ii 
it 
it 
(« 
(4 

• 

is 
it 



11 



12 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



j 



Smith, Otis Oliver. 
Taylor, Samuel Oliver. 
Thompson, John W. 
Walker, Thacker Vivian. 
(/^Weaver, Norman Randolph. 



FOURTH CLA~S. 



Allison, Charles H. 
Andrews, William Thomas. 
Bedell, Howard Alburn, 
Bedell, Paul. 

Bridges, Nathaniel Columbus. 
Cochran, Edmond Collins. 
Crenshaw, Boiling Hall. 
Crowder, Arthur Campbell. 
Crowder, Howard Grayson. 
D'Alembert, Harry Turner, 
Ferguson, Leontz Wilmore. 
Hatchett, James Benton. 
Hearn, George Watts. 
High, James Clarence. 
Holland, Edward Bell. 
Jackson,. William Carson. 
Kirkpatrick, Samuel. 
Lea, Sumpter, Jr. 
Lee, William Joseph. 
Levy, Lionel Clarence. 
Mastin, Thomas Benton. 
McDavid, William Henry. 
McLennan, Alexander Dowling. 
McMillan, Robert Houston. 
Melvin, William Arthur. 
Mitchell, Afton Person. 
Mitchell, Tennant Lomax, 
Morgan, William Barnes. 
Nelson, General Jackson. 
Pittman, Joseph Jasper. 
Powers, Edward Clyde. 
Kiggs, Robertson. 
Rowe, John Albert, 



Lee Co. 
Montgomery " 
Georgia. 
Bullock Co. 
Dallas " 



Lee M 

Georgia. 
Lee Co. 

Georgia. 
Mobile Co. 
Butler " 
Talladega " 



a 



a 



Florida. 

Baldwin Co 

Limestone " 

Lee " 

Bullock " 

Georgia, 

Lee Co. 

Dallas " 

Dallas " 

Henry " 

Georgia, 

Montgomery Co. 

Florida. 

Barbour Co. 

Talladega " 

Georgia. 

Russell Co. 
<< u 

Tallapoosa " 

Georgia. 

Tallapoosa Co, 

Lee " 

Dallas " 

Tallapoosa " 



1 



AGRICULTURAL ASD MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



13 



J 



Sankey, Frank Emmet. 
Seibert, WilPani, 
Shelton, Joseph Augustus. 
Smith, Walter Raleigh. 
Staten, W, Thomas. 
Story, Alonzo Grove. 
Taylor, Hugh McGhee. 
Thrash, Daniel Mathew. 
Tuttle, G. Hart. 
Tuttle, M. Hart. 
Van Antwerp, Andrew, 
Vaughau, Paul Turner, 
Watlington, Thomas Morgan. 
Walker,' James, 
Well*, James William. 
Williams, Madison Jack. 
Worrell, Albert Snead. 

SUB-SECTION FOURTH CLASS 

Arnold, Hugh Hrad. 
Adams n Emmett. 
Broughton, Louis Edward. 
Bryan, Judson William. 
Cooper, Houston Franklin. 
Curry, Thomas Murfey. 
Davidson, William, 
Glenn, Charles Bowles, 
Gordon, Douglas Francis. 
Hughes, Daniel. 
Harrington, George Mills. 
Hudson, Be!us Ephriam. 
Kyle, John. 

Lupton, Frank Allemong. 
Lurton, James Walter, 
Milstead, Frank Davis. 
Myddelton, Sim Smith. 
Norman, Gilbert Augustus. • 
Osborne, Jonathan Lumpkin. 
Parham, Eugene Dougkfisv*- 
Presley, John Calvin. 



Montgomery Co. 
Lowndes " 
Lee " 
Tallapoosa 4< 
Georgia. 
Talladega Co. 
Montgomery 
Dallas 
Macon 



*< 



a 



it 



u 



a 



a 



Mobile 

Dallas 

Marengo 

Chambers " 

Montgomery " 

Dallas ■" 

Talladega 



a 



a 



u 



Georgia. 

Perry Co. 

Butler " 

Georgia. 

Lownes Co. 

Talladega " 

Georgia. 

Lee Co. 

* Louisiana. 

Florida. 

Lee Co, 

Lee " 

Georgia. 

Lee Co. 

Florida. 

Elmore Co. 

Georgia. 

Lee Co. 

Georgia. 

Chambers Cdf 

^allapoosa " 



r^ 



■■ 



mm 



14 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



Randolph, Henry Keeler. 
Randall, Henry Leon, 
Ross, Thomas Alexander. 
Scott, Nathaniel Jackson. 
Torbert, Edward Alva. 
Turrentine, John. 
Walker, Allen Lea. 
Warring, George Houston. 
Wimberly, Frank Lee. 



Mobile Co. 

Texas. 

Lownies Co. 

District of Columbia. 

Russell Co. 

Limestone " 

Mississippi. 

Georgia. 

Lee Co. 



RECAPITULATION. 



First Class. 
Second Class. 
Third Class. 
Fourth Class. 
Sub Fourth Class. 

Total. 



15 
14 
35 
51 
30 

145 



/• 



L 



■" 



i""""™™ 



Military Organization 



1885-'86. 



President: 
Wm. LkROY BROUN, 



Co ami ad ud: 
MELZAR C. RICHARDS, Lieut. 2nd U. S. Artillery. 

Cadet Captains. 

T. P. ZELLERS. 
L. F. HOWELL. 
B. S. BURTON. 



' Cadet Lieut. & Adjutant. 

G. A. ALLISON, 

Cadet 1st. Lieutenants, 

L. W. SPRATL1NG. 

L. M. CAPPS. 

D. 8. WEAVER. 

Cadet Sergeant Major, 

A. F, WOOLLEY. 



Cadet Lieut. & Quartci-mastcr, 

C, H. ROSS. 

Cadet ind. Lieutenants, 

R. B. SMITH. 

R. J. H. SIMMONS. 

E K. GORDON. 

Cadet Q. M. & Color Sergeant, 

E. R. LLOYD. 



Cadrt Ut. Sergeants, 

C. W. SIMMONS. 

H. C. ARMSTRONG, Jr., 

V. L. ALLEN. 



Cadet Sergeants, 

W. H. NEWMAN. 
W. E. DAVIS. 
G. H. LAMAR. 

A, J. ALEXANDER. 

B. L BOYKIN. 
T. H. JONE*. 



Cadet Corporal. 

H. L. BROUN. 
T. D. 8AMFORD. 
W. R. PHILLIPS. 
H. 8. PERSONS, 
A. F. CORY. 



Cadet Color Corporals. 

D. M. DRIVER. 
J. H. DRAKE. 

E. L. NONNENMACHER. 
T. V. WALKER. 

E. C. MACARTNEY. 
E. H. COBB. 



■ ■ m 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



Applicants for admission must be uf good moral character and not 
less than fifteen years of age. To enter the fourth class the appli- 
cant should be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination in the 
following subjects: 

1. Geography, and History of the United States. 

2. English. — (a) An examination upon sentences containing in- 
correct English, (b) A composition giving evidence of satisfactory 
proficiency in spelling, punctuation, grammar, and division into 
paragraphs. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, including Fundamental Opera- 
tions; common and Decimal Fractions; Denominate Numbers, 
the Metric System; Percentage, including Interest and dis- 
count; Proportion; Extraction of Square and Cube Roots. 
(b) Algebra, to Quadratic Equations. 

For admission to the fourth class in tae General Course a satis- 
factory examination will be required in the following additional 
subjects: Latiu Grammar (Allen & Green ^ugh), Latin Lessons 
(Leigh ton's), Caesar (4 books.) 



ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS, 

* Entrance examinations will be held on the 15th. of September, 
the day on which the session opens. 

Applicants, who are fully prepared to stand the entrance ex- 
aminations, including those of fourteen years of age, are admit- 
ted to the sub-college department, which includes the Fifth class. 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report immediately to 
the President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any 
class previous to matriculation. 



■H 



tca^kc. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 17 

SUB-COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 

For students who fire not prepared for the regular college defer?, 
this department is regularly organized under the direction of an ex- 
perienced instructor. These students are subject to the discipline 
of the College. 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen rceitatici s 
per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in labor* 
atory work, drawing and military drill. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Students who are qualified to prosecute the studies of the Sec- 
ond class, and those over twenty one years of age who aie not can- 
didates for a degree, are permitted to take, with the advice of the 
Faculty, the subjects of study they may prefer and for which they 
may be qualified; all other students will be assigned to one of the 
regular prescribed courses of study, unless otherwise ordered by the 

Faculty. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations 
in any one study become special students. 

They will be clashed as regular students, pursuing a course for a 
degree, whenever they can pass the examinations in those subjects 
in which thav were found deficient. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and Natu- 
ral Sciences with their applications; Agriculture, Mechanics, As- 
tronomy, Mathematics, Engineering, Drawing, Euglish, French, 
German and Latin Languages, History , Political Economy. 
Mental and Moral Science. 

These studies are arrauged in regular courses so as to offjr a lib- 
eral and practical education as a preparation for the active pur- 
suits of life. 



18 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



L 



/' 



There are three Degree courses, each leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and requiring four years for its com- 
pletion: 

I '-COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

II -COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 
HI-GENERAL COURSE. .. 

There are also two Partial courses, each requiring two years for its 
completion: 

IV-TWO YEAR'S COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 
V.-TWO YEAR'S COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

CoursdI. includes theoretical acd practical instruction in those 
branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and is especially 
adapted to those who propose to devote themselves to agriculture or 
Chemical pursuits. 

Course II. includes the principles and applications of the sciences 
that directly relate to civil and mechanical engineering, and is 
adapted to those who expect to enter the profession of engineering. 

Course III. has been arranged to give a general and less technical 
education in subjects of science and language to meet the wants of 
those students who have selected no definite vocation in life, as well 
as of ihose w T ho propose ultimately to engage in teaching, or in some 
commercial or manufacturing business. 

Courses IV. and V. have been arranged for the benefit of those 
students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, are not able to 
continue at college four years and take one of the regular degree 
courses, 

Students who complete either of these two year courses, will, on 
passing a satisfactory examination, receive certificates indicating 
their attainments. 

When all of the departments in the School of Mechanic Arts are 
provided with the necessary appliances it is designed to arrange a 
more extended course in Mechanical Engineering, 







AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



COURSE IN PHARMACY. 



19 



The following resolutions were adopted by the Trustees August 
27,1885. 

"That the faculty are hereby authorized and directed to arrange as early a* practicable 
a special course of instruction in Pharmacy, adapted to qualify young men, by systema- 
tic work in chemistry and other sciences, to become practical pharmacists and chemical 
manufacturers. 

Students who expect to become practical pharmacists can enter up- 
ona special course of Chemistry and Natural History and with great 
advantage, occupy all of their time in the laboratories of these de- 
par: nients, under the immediate direction of the Professor^ 



LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature in the 
course? of education provided for the students of this college, and 
as far as posssible all students are required to enter upon laboratory 
work in some one department. 
Laboratory instruction is given in the following departments: 

I— Chemistry, 

II— — Physics. 

Ill — Engineering; Field Work. 

XV — Agricultural Engineering & Surveying. 

V Agriculture. 

VI — Natural History. 

VII — Technical Drawing, 

VIII-Mechanic Arts. 

IX — Printing & Telegraphy. 






20 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



I.— COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE 

FOURTH CLASS. 

First Term, Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 
5 Mathematics. 

3, Elementary Physiology. 
3. Drawing. 
3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

THIRD CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 

2. Botany. 
5. Mathematics. 

3, General Chemistry. 
3, Agriculture. • 
3. Drawing. 

Chemical Laboratory. 
Practical Agriculture. 
Military Drill. 

SECOND CLASS 

Second Term. 
3. English 
. 3. Physics. 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 

4. Natural History, (laboratory) 4. Natural History, (laboratory) 

1. Military Science & Tactics 1. Military Science & Tactics. 
Chemical Laboratory. Chemical Laboratory, 

, Practical Agriculture. Practical Agriculture. 

Military Drill. Military Drill. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Second Term , 
2. Political Economy. 
2, Moral Science. % 

2. Astronomy, 

4. Natural History. 
2. Agriculture. 
2. Agricultural Chemistry. 
1. Mlitary Science & Tactics, 

Chemical Laboratory. 
Practical Agriculture. 



3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

5, Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

3, Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 



First lerm. 
3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

Chemical Laboratory. 
Practical Agriculture 
Military Drill. r 

First Term. 
3, English, 
3. Physics. 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 
2' Agriculture. 



First Term. 
2. English Literature, 
\ 2. Mental Science* 
2. Physics, 
4. Natural History 
2. Agriculture. 
2. Agricultural Chemistry, 
1. Military Science & Tactics. 

Chemical Laboratory. 

Practical Agriculture. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



21 



II_C0URSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 

FOURTH CLASS. 



first Term. 
8. English. 

2. History. 
5.*' Mathematics, 
5. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 
3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English, 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture, (a) 
5. Drawing. 
3 Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. Englifh. (a) 
3. Physics. 
5- Mathematics, 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 



Second Term. 
5. English. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physiology. 
3. Drawing. 
3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

THIRD class. 

Second Term, 

3. English. 

2, Botany. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 

3. Agriculture, ^a) 
5. Drawing. 
3. Mechauic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3- English, (a) 
3. Physic*. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing., 



1 . Military Science & Tactics. 1 . Military Science & Tactics, 
Laboratory & Field work. Laboratory A Field work. 



Military Drill, 

First Term. 
2 English Literature 
2. Physics 

2. Natural History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5, Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 



Military Drill. 

FIRST CLASS 

Second Term. 

2. Political Econo ny 

2. Astronomy. 

2. Natural History, 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 



1. Military Science & Tactics. 1. Military Science & Tactics. 
Laboratory & Field work. Laboratory & Field work. 

XO TE French may be substituted for the subjects marked [a] 




22 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



III.— GENERAL COURSE. 

FOURTH CLASS. 

First Term. Second Term. 

3.'English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2. History. 
5. Latin. 5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 5, Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 3.Mechanic Art Laboratory, 
Military Drill. Military Drill. 

THIRD CLASS. 



Ftrst Term. 

5. Latin. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

Laboratory work. 
Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Latin. 
2. Natural History, 



Second Term. 

5. Latin. 

2. Botanv. 

5. Mathematics. 

3, General ( Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

Laboratory work. 
Military Drill. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Second Term 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
5. French. 
3. Latin. 
2. Natural History. 



1. Military Science & Tactics. 1. Military Science & Tactics. 



Laboratory work. 
Military Drill. 

First Term. 
2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 

4. German. 



Laboratory work. 
Military Drill. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Second Term. 
2, Political Economy. 
2. Moral Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 

4. German. 



. 1. Military Science & Tactics. 1. Military Science & Tactics. 



\ 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 23 

V— TWO-YEAR'S COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS . 



First Term 
3. English, 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

'6. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 



First lerm. 
3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 
5. English. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Elementary Physiology. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 

8EC0ND YEAR. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 

5, Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing.. 

6. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 



IV.- TWO-YEAR N S COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. Second Term. 

3. English. 5. English. 

3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 

5. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physiology. 

3, Agriculture. 3, Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 2. Botany. 
3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Practical Agriculture. Practical Agriculture. 

Military Drill. Military Drill. 



.First Term. 
3. English. 
3. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 

4. Natural History. 

Practical Agriculture. 
Military Drill. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agi {culture. 

4. Natural History. 
Practical Agriculture. 
Military Drill. 



'. ■ 



SCHEDULE OF STUDIES. 



Hours. 



I. 

8-9. 



II. 

9-10. 



^5 



Hi. 

10-11. 



Monday. 



4. Mathematics, 
3. Latin. 

3. French. 
2, Botany. 

2, Engineering. 

1, Agriculture. 

4. Physics. 
4. Latin. 

3. Chemistry, 

2. Mathematics. 
1. French, 



Tuesday. 



4. Mathematics, 
3. Latin. 
3. French. 
2. Botany. 
2. Engineering. 



4. Physics. 
4. Latin. 
3. Engineering. 
2. Mathematics. 
1, Physics 



We dnesday. 

4. Mathematics. 
3/ Latin. 



■ ,i ■> 



2. Botany. 

2. Engineering. 

1. English. 



3, Agriculture. 
2. Physics. 
1. Engineering, 
1. Naturalltistory. 
1. German 



IV. 

11-12. 



4. Mechanic Ar.s 
3. Mathematics.. 
2. Chemistry. 
2. Latin. 
1-2, Drawing. 
1. Agriculture. 



4. History. 
3. Agriculture. 

1. Engineering. 

1, German. 



4. Physics 
4. Latin, 
3. Chemistry. ."' 
2. Mathematics. , 
1. French, 



V. 

12-1. 



4. English. 
3. Mathematics. 

1. Chemistry. 

2. Botany G.& 
1-2. Drawing 

2. Agriculture, 
5, Mechanic Arts, 



2. Physics. 
1. Engineering. 
1. Nat. History. 
1* German. 



VI. 
VII. 
2-5. 



4. Mechanic Art*. 
3. History, 



1. Mathematics. 



3. Drawing. 
2. English. 
1. Ment. Science. 
1. Mathematics. 
5. Mechanic Arts. 



4. English. 
3. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 
2. Latin, u 
i-2. Drawing. 
1. Agriculture. 



4. Mechanic Arts, 
3. Pract. Agricull 4 
2. Laboratory. 
1, Engineering. •• 
I Printing. 



4, Mechanic Arts. 
Mi itary Science 
Military Drill. 



4. Drawing. 
o. xiistory. 

h Nat, History. 



4. Mechanic Arts. 
3. Pract. Agricui. 
2. Laboratory. 
Printing. 



Chapel Exercises Every Morning At 7;45. 



SCHEDULE OF STUDIES. 



Hours. 



I 

8-9. 



II 

9-10 



III 

10-11 



IV. 

11-12. 



V. 

12-1. 



VI. 

VII- 

2-5. 



Thuisdav. 



4. Mathematics. 
3. Latin. 
3. French. 
2. Botany. 
2. Engineering, 
1. Agriculture. 



4. Physics. 
4. Latin. 
3. English. 
2. Mathematics. 
1. Physics. 



4. Htetory. 
3. Agriculture. 

1. Engineering, 

, 1. German. 



3. Mathematics. 

1. Chemistry. 

2. Botany G.C. 
1 2. Drawing. 
2. Agriculture. 
5. Mechanic Arts 



Friday 



4, Mathematics. 
3. Latin. 



2. Engineering* 
1. English. 



1 4. Drawing. 
3. Drawing. 
2. English- 
1. Ment. Science. 
1. Mathematics. 
5. Mechanic Arts. 

4; Mechanic Arts 
Military Science 
Military Drill, 



4. Physics. 
4. Latin. 
3. Chemistry. 
2. Mathematics. 
1. French. 



3. English, 
2. Physics. 
1. Engineering, 



4 English. 
3. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry 
2. Latin. 
1-2 Drawing, 

5. Mechanic Arts, 



4. Drawing. 
3. Drawing. 
2. English. 
1. Nat. History. 



4. Mechanic Arts. 
3. Pract. Agricul, 
2. Laboratory. 
1. Enginemijg. . 
Printing. 



Saturday. 



Rhetorical 
Exercises 



Military Drill... 



Mechanic Arts. 
Laboratory work. 



Mechanic Arts. 
Laboratory work. 



Mechanic Arts. 
Laboratory work. 



. Chapel Exercises Every Morning At 7,-45. . 

Dxring the second term this Schedule j&w&ject to modification . 



cT 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION, 

PHY8ICS AND ASTRONOMY. ' 

President Broun. ' 

The instruction is given by recitations from text booKs and lec- 
tures, illustrated by experiments. The first part of the course is occu- 
pied with Elementary Rational Mechanics, treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussson of Molecular Mechanics, while 
due prominence is given to principles, frequent reference is made 
to the applications of science. 

The studies of the 8econd Class include the properties of matter, 
units of measure, force, work, energy; kinematics, kinetics, mechan- 
, ic powers, friction, gravitation, pendulum; molecular forceeof solids, 
liquids and gases; theory of undulations; heat, electricity, mag- 
netism; etc. 

The studies of the First Class include Electricity and its applica- 
tions; Optics, Astronomy and Meteorology. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND HISTORY. 

ProfessorDunklin. 

The subjects taught in this Department are the Latin Language 
and Literature, and History, 

Latin -The modes of instruction are? by translation from the 
Latin texts into English and from Englisn into Latin. The con- 
. stent use of black boards adds much to the progress an! accuracy 
, of the student. . \ 

A systematic course of exercises, illustrative of the principles 

Iwf ^T™* ^ ntax ' is <***** °» ^ connection 
with the fading of the authors prescribed. Special attention is 

Ki^ # 7^ fr ° m ^ ^ and t0 tb « C0 ™ 8 P™ d 
: ing idioms of the two languages. • 

The progress of the student is valued not so much by the num- 
principles of interpretation and construction, 



AGRICULTURAL AVD MSOHA.NICAL COLLEGE. 



27 



• 



History. — A course in general History, Ancient and Modern is 
given to the Fourth and Third classes in all the College Courses. 

The plan and purpose of the instruction in History are to learn 
the facts of history, their bearing on each other, and to make 
them lessons of warning and instruction; and to train the mind of 
students to proper modes of thought and reflection in reference to 
human action as far as can be done from the light of history. 

Political Economy. — A brief course in Political Economy is al- 
so given to the students of the First class, sufficients enable them 
to pursue the subject into its wide domain. 

Latin authors read: 

Fourth class. — Virgil; Cicero's Orations; Grammar and Compo- 
sition. 

Third class. — Cicero; Horace; Composition. 

Second class. — Horace; Selections from Latin P^ets and Proae 
writers. Classical Literature. 

Optional, A brief course in Greek is given to such students as 
may have time and inclination to study this language. Selections 
from Xenophon, Homer and Demosthenes may be read. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Prof. Smith. 

The general course fjr the first two years embraces the first year, 
Algebra, and Geometry six books; second year, Solid Geometry 
Plane and Spherical Trigonomety. Surveying, Mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained, first, mental discipline; 
second, a thorough knowledge of the practical applications of pure 
mathematics. * 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given in the third class, 
in farm, town and government land surveying, dividing land, 
mapping, plotting aud computing of areas, etc., also in the theory, 
adjustment and use of instruments* 

The class in sections of six or eight devote three afternoons a 
week during the second term, to field practice. 

Mensuration includes an extended course in measurements of 
heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and curvilinear figures, 
surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, lays the 
foundation for the pure and applied Mathematics of the Mechani- 
cal and Engineering Course. Analytical Geometry, Descriptive 



28 



15 ■ 






AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 



Geometry and Calculus are pursued in the Engineering cou^e. 
Especial attention is ^iven to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text books is supplement- 
ed* by lectures. Solutions of original practical problems are requir- 
ed of the student, to make him familiar with, the application of 
principles Ftudied. 

Text Books. 

Olney's and Wentworth's Algebra, Went worth's Geometry, 
Schuylers' Surveying, Loomis^ Analytical Geometry, (new edit^ 
tiota) Warren's D^riptive t 6eo W ^ Calculus, (new 

edition)* 



j 



i, 



i »* 'KXTUBAJ. HISTORY AND GEOLOGY,' 



Prof . Mfall „ . . 

Geology.— This subject 'is studied in the senior pJass. j 
Special attends is given to the Geology of Alab w ..„The course 
is given by text books and lectures, illustrated by meapsof diagrams* 

to be rotfnd in the Geological Cabinet,, Attention, is given to /the 
nature and origin of W deposits? mineral 8pring «; '*£ $£™ 
Ueological relations of soils. *>'• " a >: > i vt. < 

Zoology=~A systematic arangfement of M Animal Kingdom in 

accordance with ; patu^ an^nji^, is.made a special feature of th* 

instruction. Particular att ea ti « is also given to insects injuries to 

vegetation, their habits, and jthe methods best adapted for checking 

their ravages. . , , ; 

Bbtany.-The students of the Third Class begins study W Bot- 
any, and continue it through the second term. Analytical work 
ITt-" 1 '- VT^ 5*°* ThUClass «Provided-with plants 

afWco^p eting the course, to namely of the ordinary .weeds am5 
g T^'^ 6 - llJ e ^ un terJn this section, 

^^WV^Ppteny, and to advanced laboratory work with the 

fnl^tit nt^r [ - J W OT «»^ti«n, butalaoto .piuctic* them 

lvS£ C TS^f^^at are injuriL J fruits, 
ana vegetables. A Biological laboratory has beeu.fitted, *p ht 



til 



■i* 



,« 






■ 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL C0LLE3E. 29 

students, provided with excellent microscopes o. tbe most improved 
patterns, well constructed table,, and all the necessary chemicals 

Jm!!!?"!? T m ° UDting VegetaWe US8U6S - A dark "x^ » at. 
tached to this laborator/ for micro-photographic wo rk, 

The te .ching of Botany is greatly facilitated by the use of An- 
zoux s, complete set of clastic models of plants. 

Physiology.-This subject is taught to the students of the Fourth 
class, and .s completed in the second term of the s^sion. The text 
is illustrated by models and microscopical sections projected on the' 

screen A s.eleton, finely articulated, has been provided for the 
use of the class. ° 



Text Books 



Le Conte's Geology, Holder's Zoology, Besseys Botany Amrar's 
Plant Analysis, Martin's Human Body. ' 7 * Pg 

ALABAMA WEATHER SERVICE 

8^ U ! ited / tat ^ SigDaI Service haS «•"«•* » Alabama a 
State System for collecting meteorological data relating to climatic 

changes. The service is now in successful Operation with the cen- 
tral office located at this Institute. Bulletins are ,.<*ued at the close 
of each mo:ith, compiled from reports sent the Director from uumer 
ousstationsscatteredthroughjuttheState. An opportunity is thin' 
offered the students in Meteorology for becoming familiar with the 

system so long successfully operated by the Department at Wash 

mgton. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

Professor Lane. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies of this department begin in the Second Class 
and require a good knowledge of Algebra, Geometry, Trigonon.e ry 
and Mechanics. They are as follows: 

Second Class,— Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic curves 
turnouts, and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting slope slakes 
location and construction of common roads and railroads. 

First Class —Classification, appearances, defects, seasoning 
durability and preservation of timber;, classification and description 
of natural building stones; bricks, and concretes; cast and wrought 
iron, steel and other metals; limes, cements, mortars their manu- 
facture; paints and other preservatives; classification of strains and 
a general mathematical discussion of the tame; joints and fastenings- 



— _ 




V 



30 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 



«olid and open built beams; classification, construction and mechan- 
ics of masonry; foundations on land and water; bridges and roofs of 
different kinds, their construction and strains determined mathemat- 
ically aud graphically; comm3n roads, their coverings, location and 
construction; location and construction of railroads: navigable, irri- 
gation and drainage canals; river and sea-coast improvements* 

Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

For practical work, this Department has been supplied with two 
transits, one having the solar attachment, two engineers' levels, a 
farmer's level, i wo surveyor's compasses, a railroad compass, one sex- 
tant, one pocket sextant, an aneroid barometer, an Abney hand 
level and clinometer and other instruments. 

The library has been supplied with books of reference. 

Text Booh. 

Second Class, — Hench's Field Book for Railway Engineers, Gil- 
lespie's Roads, and Rail Roads. 

First Class,— Wheeler's Civil Engineering, Von Ott*s Graphic 
Statics. 



DRAWING. 

All of the students of the Third and Fourth classes are required 
to take Drawing; but only the students in Mechanics and Engineer- 
ing, in the First and Second classes. 

The Fourth class is taught linear drawing and elementary graph- 
ical mechanics. The Third class is instructed in the principles of 
orthographic and isometric projections, shades and shadows, prac- 
tical perspective atfd tinting. In the Second class, the instruction 
embraces a more extended course in orthographic and isometric 
drawings, perspective, shades and shadows and tinting; also sketch- 
es of tools and machines, plans, elevations and cross-sections of 
buildings. The First class make topographical drawings and draw- 
ings of machines, roofs, bridges etc. to different scales. Plans, pro- 
files and sections of railroad surveys complete the instruction in this 
department. 

The drawing rooms are furnished with adjustable tables with black 
walnut tops and iron stands, Schroeder's and other models, French, 
German, English and American plates of roofs, bridges, masonry, 
tools, machines etc. , etc. 



m 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



31 



Text Books: 

Fourth Class, — Davidson's Linear Drawing, Broun's Elementary 
Graphical Mechanics. 

Third Class, — Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical 
Per spective. 

Second Class,-Davidson'8 Building Construction, Davidsoi^Draw- 
ing for Mechanics and Engi leers. Plates belonging to the College. 

First Class, — French, German, English and American Plates 
belonging to the College. 

AGRICULTURE. 

Prof Newman, 
Instruction in this department commences with the Third Class 
and continues through the Second and First Classes. Thesul- 
ject is taught principally by lectures in which it is treated as an ap- 
plied science, or the application of the teachings of the natural 
sciences to the art of agriculture, using the farm of the Experi- 
ment Station as a laboratory for the practical illustration of the 
lecture room instruction. 

The classes accompany the professor (who is also Director of the 
Station) into the field, garden, orchard, vineyard, the green house 
and stock yard, where lectures aie delivered in the presence of lie 
work in progress, the objects and results of experiments explained, 
the propagation, planting, pruning and cultivation of plants illus- 
trated, and so far as deemed necessary for thorough instruction, 
manual labor required of the students in any and every department 
of the farm. 

Every principle and theory taught in the lecture room will 1 e 
thoroughly illustrated and exemplifieJon the farm. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

J. S. Newman, Director. 

The state Agricultural Experiment Station is connected with the 

College. 

The farm of the station is adjacent to the College buildings and is 
used by the professor of agriculture to illustrate his lecture-room 
instruction. Here a great variety of experiments in Agriculture, 
Horticulture, stock breeding and stock feeeding will serve not only 
the purposes of instruction to the students, but will afford valuable 



x 



^— . 



■»•*»■ 







- 






32 AGRICULTURAL ASD MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

information to the farmers of the State, many of whom already 
8 how their appreciation of the Station by visiting it for the purpose 
of inspecting the work in progress. 

Bulletins are issued regularly through the State Department ol 
Agriculture and widely distributed over the State by the Commis- 
sioner. 

MODERN LANGUAGES AND ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

Prof. Thach, 

ENGLISH. 

In this department the students are carried through a system- 
atic course of study in the English language and literature. In 
the courses of study which do not include the ancient classics, a 
full course in English is especially important. It is, therefore, de- 
signed, as much as the time allotted permits, to familiarize these 
students by frequent exercises with the standard authors of the 

language. 

The course of study is as follows: ~> 

Fourth Class.- Three hours a week, study of Grammar; the 
principles of special and general composition, with frequent brief 
papers illustrating the laws studied. ^ 

Third Class — Three hours a week, study of style, analysis of the 
selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on literary aud his- 
torical themes. 

Second Class. — Three hours a week, critical study of English 
Classics, History of English and American Literature, Logic, Essays. 

First Class.— Two hours aweek, first term, principles of criticism 
and study of English Classics. 

Weekly exercises in declamation aro held in the third class. 
Three original orations are required during the year of each student 
in the first and second classes. & 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

No attempt is made in this department to teach a student to. 
speak French and German. The aim is to give such a facility in 
reading these two languages as will afford ready access to the im 
portant scientific papers in foreign journals. The following courses 
are pursued; 

Frencn,— L Otto's Grammar, part first; exercises in writing 
French; French readings. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 



33 



French,— II. Otto's Grammar, part second; French imposition, 
Racine's Athalie. 

French— III. composition, scientific French. 

German — I. Otto's Grammar, part first; exercises in writing Ger- 
man; German readings. 

German — II. Otto's Grammar, part second, Schiller's Wilhelm 
Tell, Scientific German and composition. 



CHEMISTRY 



r. 



Professor Lupton. 



Assistants, Ross and Wilkinson. 



Instruction in this department embraces — < M 

1 . A course of lectures in General Chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in Industrial Chgmistry. 

3. A course of lectures in Agricultural Chemistry. ,, 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with each course 
of lectures for the practice of chemical analysis and chemical research. 

1. ( bourse in General Chemistry. This consists of a series of lec- 
tures (^three per week) extending throughout the entire session and in 
eludes a discussion of the fundamental principles of Chemical Phi- 
losophy in connection with the history, preparation, properties, and 
compounds of the metallic and non-metallic elements, with the main 
facts and principles of Organic Chemistry. In this course, the more 
common applications of Chemistry to the Arts and Manufactures are 
discussed. The apparatus Used for experimental illustration is ex- 
tensive ^containing the newest and most approved instruments ne- 
cessary for presenting the subject in the most attractive and instruc- 
tive form. 

Reference-books: Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland,. 
Remsen, Cooke's Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. The lectures on Industrial Chemistry (three per weak) ex- 
tend throughout the Session, and include a discussion in detail of the 
processes and chemical principles involved in the most important 
applications of Chemist/y in the Arts and Manufactures, in the re- 
duction of ores, the preparation of materials for food and drink, for 
clothing, shelter, heating, illumination, cleansing, purifying, writ- 
ing, printing, etc. ^ 



— - ' 



( 



34 



AGRICULTURAL A>"D MECHANIOAL COLLEGE. 






These Lectures are amply illustrated by mean-? of suitable speci- 
mens of raw materials and manufacturing products, together with 
models and diagrams. 

Reference booh: Wagners Chemical Technology, Muspratt's 
Chemistry as applied to Arts and Manufactures, Ure's Dictionary, 
Watt's Dictionary, Richardson and Watt's Chemical Technology. 
Percy's Metallurgy. 

3. Coarse in Agricultural Chemistry. This consists of lectures on 
Chemistry in its applications to Agriculture (two per week) and 
includes a thorough discussion of the origin, composition, and clas- 
sification of soils, the composition and growth of plants, the sources 
of plant-foo«i and how obtained, the improvement of soils, the man- 
ufacture and use of fertilizers, the chemical principles involved in 
the rotation of crops, in the feeding of live stock, and in the var- 
ious operations carried on by the intelligent and successful agricul- 
turist. 

Booh of Reference,— Lupton's Elementary Principles of Scien- 
tific Agriculture, Johnston & Cameron's Elements of Agricultural 
Chemistry Scientific Journals ,ReportsJof the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, and the bulletins and reports of the various 
home and foreign Agricultural Departments and Stations. 

4. The Course of Systematic Laboratory work. This course of 
practical work in the Laboratory is carried on in connection with 
each course of lectures and embraces the practical operations of 
Chemical analysis ancl synthesis, being varied somewhat to suit the 
individual object of the student. 

The Laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. during 
five days in the week, are amply supplied with every thing neces- 
sary for instruction in chemical manipulation, i^ the qualitative 
and quantitative analysis of soils, fertilizers, minerals, mineral 
waters, technical products, etc., and in the method of prosecuting 
chemical researches. Unusual facilities are offered to students 
who wish to devote their time . to the special study of Practical 
Chemistry. 

A fee of $10 per Session is charged each student in the Analyt- 
ical Laboratory for the use of apparatus, and for material con- 
sumed. 

Each student on entering the Chemical Laboratory is required to 
deposit $5, and is furnished with a working-table, a set of reagent 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 35 

lottks, and the common reagents and upparatus used in Qualitative 
and Quantitative Anaiv.es. At the clo©eof the session he will be 
credited with such articles as may be returned in" good order; the 
value oi those which have been injured or destroyed will be deduc- 
ted from the deposit. 

Books used: In Qualitative Analysis — Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In Quantitative Analysis — Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, 
Rickett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assay- 
ing. In Agricultural Chemical Analysis — Church, Fraukland. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORIES. 

These are well adapted to analytical work. There are six rooms 
and two balance rooms. The work rooms contain a table for each 
student, provided with gas and water facilities, a set of reagent bot- 
tles and necessary apparatus. The lecture room is 40 by 40 feet in 
size, and is provided with every facility for illustrating lectures by 
experiments. The furnace is supplied with a boiler, which runs 
the stills, and the water and filter pumps, of the work laboratory. 

In the balance rooms are balances made by Oertling Verbeck, 
PicKholdt, Troemner and Becker, 

STATE LABORATORY AND LABORATORY OF EXPERIMENT STATION 

Professor Lupton, State Chemist. Assts. Ross and Wilkerson. 

In this laboratory work is done for the Department of Agricul- 
ture a^d the Experiment Station. During the present sesson about 
200 quantitative analyses have been made consisting of commer- 
cial fertilizers, marls phosphates, muck, iron and gold ores, miner- 
al waters and soils, Numerous qualitative analyses have also been 

made. 

This laboratory performs the following work: first analyses of 
commercial fertilizers, minerals, marls, ores etc., for the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

2nd. Analyses for State Experiment Station, 

3rd. Analyses for private parties/ 

The Commissioner of Agriculture orders the work done under 
1st., head, the Director of Experiment Station the 2nd.; while a 
charge is made for the 3rd. 



H 



— 









36 AGRICULTU RAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

>• 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

Lieut. Richards U. S. Army, Commandant. 

Military Science ar>d Tactics are required to be taught in this In- 
stitution by law. This law is faithfully carried out, by imparting to 
each student not physically incapacitated to bear arms, practical in- 
struction in the School of the Soldier, of the Company and of the 
Battalion, also in Guard Mounting, Inspections, Dress Parades, 
Reviews, etc. 

Under Section 1225 U. S. Revised Statutes, the College is provi- 
ded with modern Cadet Rifles and accoutrements and two pieces of 
Field Artillery. Ammunition for practice firing is used under the 
direction of an experienced officer. 

The following uniform of standard cadet gray cloth has been 
prescribed for dress, viz: Coats and pants as worn at West Point, 
with sack-coat for fatigue, dark blue cadet cap, white helmet for 
dress occasions. 

A very neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained here at 
$18. This is less expensive than the usual clothing. All students 
are required to wear this uniform during the term. 

The drills are short, and the military duty involves no hardships. 
The military drill is a health giving exercise, and its good effects in 
the development of the physique and improvement of the carriage of 
the cadet are manifest. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies The offi- 
cers are selected for proficiency in drill, deportment and studies. 
Ea*h company is officered by one Captain, one 1st. Lieutenant, one 
2nd Lieutenant and with a proper number of Sergeants and Corpor- 
als, The officers and non-commissioned officers are distinguished by 
appropriate insignia of rank. These appointments are conferred by 
the President, on nomination of the Commandant. 

Privates of the First Class may be excused by the Faculty from 
all military drill except battalion drill, i 

The First and Second Classes recite once a week in Military Tac- 
tics, 

MECHANIC ART8. 

G. H. Bryant, B. S., Instructor. 
This department of Manual Training will embrace when completed 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 37 

a three year's course as follows: 

1st. year, wood-working — carpentry, turning, etc. 

2nd. year, forge and foundry — black-smithing, moulding and 
casting. 

3d. year, machine shop, — chipping and filing, and machine work 
in metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the three lower class- 
es (5th., 4th. and 3rd.) in Mechanics and Engineering, but may be 
pursued by other students wiih the consent of the Faculty. 

During the past year the wood working shop has been equipped 
and is in very successful operation, and it is the purpose of the au 
thoritiesto complete the other departments as soon as funds are avail- 
able. It is expec:ed this year to build and equip the forge, and 
foundry departments. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 
from a twenty five horse-power Harris-Corliss automatic engine, 
which is supplied with steam by a thirty horse power steel horizon, 
tal tubular boiler of most approved design. A Deane steam pump 
and a heater for the feed water form a part of the steam apparatus. 

The equipment in the wood working department comprises thefol 
lowing: 20 wood working benches, each with complete set of carpen 
ters' tools; 16 turning lathes, 10 in. swing, 30 in. between centres, 
each with complete set of tools; 1 double circular saw; 1 baud saw; 1 
board planing machine; 1 buzz planer; 2 scroll saws (power) ;1 large 
pattern-maker's lathe; 16 in. swing, 4 ft. between centers; 1 36 in. 
grindstone. In addition to these the tool room is supplied with a 
variety of extra hand tools for special work. 

The course of work in this department comprises: 

I. A course of carpentry (hand work) covering the first term and 
part of the second, or about five months. .The lessons include; 
instruction on the nature and the use of tools, elementary work with 
plane, saw, chisel, Ac, different kinds of joints — timber-splices, 
cross-joints, mortice and tennon, used in construction, miter and 
frame work, dove-tail work comprising different kinds of dovetail 
joints used in cabinet making, &c,, <fec. 

II A. course in Turning and Pattern making, covering the first 
three months of second term. The le ssons comprise first, nature and 
use of lathe tools, cylindrical turning, caliper work — turning to 
different diameters a jd lengths, simple curves, compound curves, 
taper work, screw-plate work. 



1L. 




-/* 



38 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 

rosette turning, chuck work—hollow and spherical turning,etc, etc, 
III. Special work, covering the remainder of the year, combin- 
ing hand and lathe work, cabinet-making, scroll work, and the use 
of the various machines. Besides this much oftherepaiisand im- 
provments about the shop are done by the students, thus giving 
them actual practical construction. 

All instruction is given, 1st. by black-board drawings or sketches 
which the student copies, with dimentions, in a note book with 
which each one provides himself; thus each one works from his own 
notes. This supplemented, whenever necessary, by the actual con- 
struction of the lesson by the instructor before the class; 2nd. by 
inspection and direction at bench by instructor. There are three 
exercises in this course, each two hours long. 

A special course of instruction is also given to more advanced 
students especially interested in the subject of Applied Mechanics, 
comprising, 1st, A series of lectures on elementary Steapi aud Mill 
Engineering, supplemented by actual experiment and practice with 
the apparatus, including steam generation, and the nature and use 
of the steam boiler and its accompaning apparatus; steam as a mo- 
tive power, and the forms, construction and use of the steam engine, 
with the study and the use of the Indicator; transmission of power, 
shafting, belting, etc. 2d* A course of shop work, — carpentry turn- 
ing, etc. — this part being a more comprehensive course than that 
for the lower classes. 






wsmamam 



— 






POST-GRADUATE DEGREES, 

There are two Post-Oraduate Degrees-M ASTER OF SCIENCE and CIVIL ENGINEER- 



ING. 



Any graduate of this College, who shall, after graduation, actively 
engage, for at least three years, in literary or scientific work in the 
line of his profession, and who may, by an examination presented 
by the Faculty, give satisfactory evidence of sufficient advance- 
ment, shall be entitled to a Post-Graduate Degree. The requisite 
course of study and the nature of the examination may be obtain- 
ed by corresponding with the Faculty. A Post-Graduate Degree 
also may be obtained by a graduate by one year's residence at 
the College spent in the successful prosecution of such a course of 
applied science as will be prescribed by 'the Faculty. 

Applicants for Post-Graduate Degrees must matriculate ai,d de- 
posit with the treasurer the amounts of their diploma fees. They 
must also write and present to the Faculty a satisfactory thesis 
upon some subject pertaining to their professions. 

Resident Graduates may prosecute the studies in any depart- 
ment of the College without payment of regular fees. 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions will be awarded, in the different subjects of each class, 
to those students whose grade is above 90 per cent, and who have 
satisfactorily passed all the regular examinations of that session. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded on Commencement day to 
those students who obtain three Distinctions. 

RECORDS AND CIKCULARS. 

Daily records of various exercises of the classes are kept by the 
officers of instruction, in a form adapted to permanent preservation 

From the record a circular, or statement is sent to the parent or 
guardian/monthly. 



207884 



40 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



EXAMINATIONS. 

\Vritten recitations or monthly examinations on the studies of the 
month are held at the option of the Professor. 

At the end of each term written or oral examinations, oc both, are 
held on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the Faculty, and 
in no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examina- 
tions can be promoted to full standing to the next higher class only 
on satisfactory examinations at the opening of next session. 

It is required that every student who enters the college shall remain , 
through the examinations at the end of the term. Leaves of absence 
and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted within six 
weeks of the examinations, except in extreme cases. 

Examinations for degrees or certificates of proficiency embrace 
the entire subject of study in the course. 

MUSEUM OP NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. 

. Many valuable additions have oeen made to the various branch- 
es of this Museum within the past few years. 

Contributions have been received from different States of the 
Union, from England, Italy, France, and the Bermuda Islands. 

The Geology of Alabama is well illustrated with minerals, fossil- 
iferous and non-fossiliferous rocks from the different formations of 
the State. The Museum is divided into the departments of Miner- 
alogy, Conchology, Geology, Zoology and Botany. Each depart- 
ment is systematically arranged and catalogued for study and 
inspection. 

The entire collection of the Museum, added to the private Cabi- 
net belonging to the Professor of Natural History, numbers more 
than ? 0,000 specimens. 

MUSEUM OF AGRICULTURE. 

The Agricultural Museum is intended to illustrate, as fer as pos- 
sible, the agricultural products of this and other countries. It now 
contains nearly 1,000 specimens, obtained by donations and by a 
system of exchanges with other Agricultural Colleges, illustrating 
varieties of soil, cotton, wheat, oats, corn, peas, grasses etc, 



i 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 41 

LIBRARY. 

A room in the College building is appropriated to the Library, 
but the numoer of books at present i9 not large. A portion of the 
recent appropriation made by the State Legislature has baen used 
in the purchase of books. For this purpose there is also paid 
a small annual fee by each student. 

The Library is open at stated times, when students are permitted 
to select books according to regulations prescribed by the Fac 
ulty 

PRINTING OFFICE. 

The Printing Office is under the charge of Professor Mell, who 
assisted by D. M. Thrasli as foreman, superintends the work of the 
class in printing at fixed hours during the week. The office occu 
pies a large room in the College building and has a complete outfi: 
consisting of an excellent Gordon press, with fonts of type and stands 
for twelve students. It is open each aft ei noon fbr practice by the 
cadets. This Department is also furnished with a Caligraph 
Type-writer where special students have the opportunity of becom- 
ing familiar with type writing. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by (he President 
and Faculty in accordance with the Code of Laws and Regulations 

enacted by the Trustees. 

Attention to stu-ly, and punctuality in attendance on recitations 
and all other duties, is required of every student. 

Students are not allowed to have in their possession weapons or 
arms not issued for the performance of military duty. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 
All students are required to attend these exercises, and also to at- 
tend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes every 

Sunday 







42 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 

•LOCATION. 






The College is situated in the town of Auburn sixty miles froiii 
Montgomery, directly on the line of the Western Railroad. 

The region is high and healthful — 821 feet above tide water. By 
statute of the State the sale of spirituous liquors aid keeping sa- 
loons of any kind, within five miles of Auburn are forbidden. 

. THESIS. 

Each applicant for a regular degree is required to write and sub- 
nit to the Faculty a thesis on a subject of immediate relation to 
some study of his course, and deliver the same at commencement, 
if required by the Faculty. 

This thesis must be given to the Professor of English by the 
first day of June, 



< 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two Literary Societies— the Wirt and Websterian— 
connected with the College. Each has a commodious hall, hand- 
somely fitted up, a library of standard and miscellaneous works and 
a reading room. Their weekly exercises add to the facilities afford- 
ed by the College for practice in composition, elocution and discus- 
sion. 

These Societies hold celebrations on the evenings of Thanksgiving 
Day and the 22d of February, and also on Monday and Tuesday 
evenings during ;Commencement week. They elect annually, with 
the approval of the Faculty, an orator to represent them at the 
close of the year. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the society, is de- 

r r f 7 i U n fT V™ 118 Commenc ^»t week. R. L. Thorn- 
ton of 78, Orator for 1885-'86. 

C C^TV 1 ' FmCr ' PK * ident; T ' J - L « M '. Vi <* President; 
U C. rnach, Treasurer and Secretary; 

ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP. 

mU^^^'T** 8 '*"? 24 > lm > theSociet y established a 
£52? V * ♦T' ? *" Alumni afcfrnMp. The fund for 
the scholarship is to be raised by voluntary contributions from the 



\ 



J 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANIOAL COLLEGE. 43 

members o£ the society, to be paid anuually, and the beneficiary is 
to be elected by the society at its annual meeting in June. The 
Executive Committee, who have charge of this fund for the pres- 
ent year and to whom all communications should be directed, are 
T. H. Frazer and C C. Thach, Auburn, Ala., andC. H. LincUey, 
Mobile, Ala. 

BOARDING. 

Students after selecting their boarding-houses, will not be per- 
mitted to make changes without obtaining permission from the col- 
lege authori ies. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION FREE TO ALL STUDENTS. 

Incidental fee, per term $7. 50 

Library fee, per term. _ 1 . 00 

Surgeon's fee, per term .....2.50 

Board, per month, with fuel and lights $12 to 14.00 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are requested to deposit with the Treasur- 
er of the College all funds designed for sons or wards, whether lor 
regular charges of College fees and board, or for any other purpose. It 
it is the duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed in his 
hands, and to pay all expenses incurred by the students, inclu iing 
board, uniform, books, etc., only when approved by the President, 

ACADEMIC YEAR, 

The Academic Year, which is divided into two equal terms, com- 
mences on the third Wednesday in September, and ends on the last 
Wednesday in June following, which is Commencement day. 

The second term begins on the second Wednesday in February. 



< 



RESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 

The Following resolution was adopted by the trustees at their meeting held August 

27 1885! 

"That in view of the increased facilities for instruction in Agriculture, and the 
technical departments of education, now possessed by this college, especially in the 
department of Mechanic Arts, made possible by the recent donation from the State, 
the faculty are authorized, in addition to the legal name of this college, to print on 
the catalogue the words ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, as significan t 
of the expanded system of practical instuction in industrial science in thecourset 
of education now provided for. 



207884 






— 



i 



DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 



By 



By 



By 



Hon. J. L. Pugh, 50 Volumes. Consisting in part of 
Censusof 1680. 
Report of Commissioner of Fisheries* 
Report of United States Coast Survey. 
Report of National Board of Health. 
Cotton and Woollen Mills of Europe. 

Hon. J. T. Morgan, 10 Volumes. 
Report of Commissioner of Patents. 
Public Documents. 

Hon. W. C. Oates, 80 Volumes. Consisting in part of 

Report of Bureau Ethnology. 
Report of Geological Survey. 
Congressional Record of 1886. 
Public Documents. 

War Department. 2 Volumes. 
Secretary Interior. 5 Volumes. 
Department of State. 4 Volumes, 
Smithsonian Institute. 1 Volume. 
Maasachusett's Agricultural College Reports. 
University California Reports. 
Michigan Agricultural College Reports. 
North Carolina Experiment Station Reports. 
History of Butler Co., J. B. Little. 



t-s^. 



% 



\ 



Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



1886 



OCLC: 36819601 
Entered: 19970429 



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Dates: 1873, 


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Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. 1 

Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama *h [microform] 1 

► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 

► 10 24610 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Auburn, Alabama I 

► 11 24610 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama I 

► 12 24610 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama f 

Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, I 
21 v. ; *c 21 cm. I 
Annual I 

1872-73-1892-93. I 
Title varies slightly. I 

Microfilm. *m 1873-1893. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
*d 1997. *c microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. I 

► 19 539 d *b 1873 *c 1893 *d alu *e u *f u.*g a 1 

► 20 650 Universities and colleges *z Alabama *x Periodicals, f 

► 21 61020 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 
Periodicals. I 

► 22 78000 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue and 
circular of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama I 

► 23 78500 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 

► 24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project I 



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211848 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



LEGISLATION. 



Act of Congress. 

An Act donating Public Lands to the several States and Territor- 
ies which may provide Colleges for the benefit of Agriculture and 
the Mechanic Art*. (Approved July 2d 1862 ) 

.fSVy thelto'te^icTTd That a " m ° neyS ** lwd ' r0m *• 8aIe ° f «*• tand 
h«^T^f ^, . . land8 8re a PP°"-«"ned and from the sale of land serin 

herein before provided for. shall be Invested in stocks of the United State or nf th» 
States, or some other safe stocks vieldlnBnnn««.h„.,« ' ' of the 

ment, support and maintenance of at iJLst one ro> w T"' °1"" S "*' to the endow " 
eral pursuits and professions in life edUCtttion of the '"Atrial classes in the sev- 



Act of the State Legislature 
An act to establish a college at Auburn, in Lee Countv Alabama 
for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts, pUuant to 
an act of the Congress of the TTnif*^ g*„* pursuant to 

26, 1872. ' a W> roved February 

la^bLed^A^^n^Sy S ¥ "*T ^ there * 8nd h ^ 
•nd the mechanic art. whl^X*^ 

and ctassical studies and including mUiE to SltT"^ '"* ° ther SCientific 
••relate to agriculture and the mecKanic art, iT".' , ^ SU h branch <* of learning 
of -.he Unied State, entitled ™£S£^££^* m ™« ^Co^ 
torles which may provide colleges for theSflVn/.^ ?. theteveral «t»t» and terri- 
approved July 2d eighteen hSuWrfSf^ ■fjnttiw «nd the mechanic arts, 
hereafter provided ™«wm and sixty two, under such regulations as may to 

<^Ae^^^ 

P. Harrison' secretary of its boird l of TrL.L 7, P n the President, and George 

of the college buifitms ^££££^T™ ' ** 1 ° f C0DVeyan - 
forth in said deed, to the Stole of Atotama T^I '"J*" 1 ' as described and set 

of the I7th, day of February! eightee^und^d the p nrpose tbeKln g 

hy^p^fortnepu^^t^rrorr^T^^ 



±0*71 



*± 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



An act in relation to the Agricultural and Mechanical college of 
Alabama, approved February 26, 1872. 

Sec. 21, Be it further enacted, That the interest, income and proceeds arising from the 
investment of the funds created by the sale Of lands or land scrip, granted by the Con- 
gress of the United States to this State for the promotion of agriculture and the me- 
chanic arts, shall be paid to the treasurer of said college as the same may accrue and be 
needed for the purposes of said agricultural and mechanical college, on the order of 
said treasurer upon the auditor of the State, who shall draw his warrant on the treas- 
urer of the State for the same. 



An act to amend an act entitled an act to establish a department 
of agriculture for the State of Alabama; approved February 17th, 
1885. 

Sec. 21, Be it further enacted , That for the purposeof establishing an experimental farm or 
station, one-third of the net proceeds annually accruing from the sale of tags as herein 
before provided, shall be paid to the treasurer of the Agricultural and Mechanical 
Collegeonthe approval of the governor, to be disbursed under the direction of the board 
of trustees of said institution, for the development of the agricultural and mechanical 
departments of said college.. Provided, the trustees of said college shall cause to bo 
made at said college all analyses of fertilizers that may be require 1 under the pro- 
visions of this act, as well as such other analyses as the commissioner of agriculture 
may deem advisable without any charge therefor; and provided further, that the trus- 
tees shall establish and maintain an agricultural experimental farm or station, where 
earful experiments shall be made in scientific agricultuie, results of which, together 
with other needed information, shall be furnished the commissioner of agricultuie' for 
publication in his monthly and annual reports. 



h 



An act to establish agricultural experiment stations in connection 
with the colleges established in the several states under the provis 
ions of an act approved July 2, 1 862, and of the acts supplementary 
thereto. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representees of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled, That in order to aid in acquiring and diffusing 
among the people of the United States useful and practical information on subjects 
connected with agriculture, and to promote scientific investigation and experiment 
respecting the principles and applications of agricultural science, there shall be es- 
tablished, under direction of the college or colleges, or agricultural department of col- 
leges in each state or territory established, or which may hereafter be established, in 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



accordance with the provisions of an act approved July 2, 1862, entitled "An act 
donating public lands to the several states and territories which may provide colleges 
for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts," or any of the supplements 
of said act, a department to be known a ad designated as an "agricultural experiment 
station!" provided, That in any state or territory in which two such colleges have been 
or may be so established, the appropriation hereinafter made to such state or territory 
shall be equally divided between such colleges, unless the Legislature of such state 
or territory shall otherwise direct. 

Sec. 2. That it shall be the object and duty of said experiment stations to conduct 
original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of plants and animals; the 
diseases to which they are severally subject, with the remedies for the same; the chem- 
ical composition of useful plants at their different stages of growth; the comparative 
advantages of rotative cropping as pursued under a varying series of crops; th* capaci- 
ty of new plants or trees for acclimation; the analysis of soils and water; the chemical 
composition of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments designed to test their 
comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the adaptation and value of grasses 
and forage plants; the composition and digestibility of the different kinds of food for 
domestic animals; the scientific and economic questions involved in the production 
of butter and cheese; and such other researches or experiments bearing directly on the 
agricultural industry of the United States as may in eaoh case be deemed advisable, 
having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of the respective states or ter- 
itories. 

8ec, 4. That bulletins or reports of progress shall be published at said stations 
• at least once in three months, one copy of which shall be sent to each newspaper in the 
states or territories in which they are respectively located, and to such individuals 
as actually engage in farming as may request the same, and as far as the means of the 
station will permit. Such bulletins or reports, and the annual reports of said station 
shall be transmitted in the mail of the United States free of charge for postage, under 
such regulations as the postmaster-general may from time to time prescribe. 



1 I ' 



■■ 



F 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



y 



His Excellency, THOMAS SEAY President. 

Hon. SOLOMON PALMER, Superintendent of Edncation. 



Hon. W. H. BARNES, 

Hon. C. C. LANGDON, 

Hon. R. F. KOLB, 

Hon. JONATHAN HARALSON, 

Hon. R. F. LIGON, 
Hon. JOHN W. BISHOP, 
Hon. J. G. GILCHRIST, 
Hon. M. L. STANSEL, 
Hon. J. N. MALONE, 



term expires 1893. 
term expires ISM* 
term expires 1893. 
term expires 1889. 
term expires 1889. 
term expires 1889. 
term expires 1891. 
term expires 1891. 
term expires 1891. 



ex-offlcio. 

ex-officio. 

Opelika. 

Mobile. 

Eufaula. 

Selma. 

Tuskegee. 

Talladega. 

Montgomery. 

Carrollton. 

Athens. 



E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. 

F. M. REESE, Secretary. 



\ 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS 



WM. LeROY BROUN. M. A.> LL.D. 
President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M. 
Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, Jr., M. E., Ph. D. 
Professor of Natural History and Geology. 

JAMKS H. LANE, C. E., A. M. 
Professor of ClvU Engineering and Drawing. 

J. 8. NEWMAN, 
Professor of Agriculture and Director of the Experiment Station. 

CHARLES C. THACH, B. E. i 
Professor of English and Latin 

N. T. LUPTON, A. M., M. D.. LL. D. 
! rofessor of General and Agricultural Chemistry, and State Chemist. 

LIEUT. M. C. RICHARDS, 2d ArtilleV! U. 8. A. [ Wed Point) 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 

GEORGE H. BRYANT, Iff E. [ Warn. Inst. Technology,) 
Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

W.S. FLEVIIVG,A.B, 
Adjunct Professor of Modern Languages and History 

L. W. WILKINSON, B, Sc. ) 

B. s. BURTONr B. 8c. \ Assistants in the Chemical Laboratory. 



JA8 W. MORGAN, Jr. 
C. W.8TMM0NS. 



. S. C. PITT8, B. Se, 
Assistant in Mechanic Arts 



• 

j Assistants in Mathematics and English. 



J.H. DRAKE, M.D. 
Surgeon. 

C C. THACH, 
Recording Secretary. 

W. S. FLEMING, 
Corresponding Secretary. 



AGMCUTI/niRAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



7 



OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE 






The leading object of the college, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the St&te ' Legislature, is to 
teach the principles *and the applications of science. 

In its courses of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially those that relate 
to agriculture and the mechanic arts, so far as the facilities 
at its disposal will permit; and at the same time the dis- 
cipline obtained by the study of languages and other sciences ij9 
not neglected. 

All students are required to study the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are" also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to stndents in any 
course. 

The special or technical instruction given is thus based on 
a sound general education. 

The college in fact has become a distinctive school of 
industrial science — or Polytechnic Institute — a title which 
by resolution of the trustees is permitted to be inscrib- 
ed on the catalogue ; and work of great value to the youth 
of the state is now being accomplished by fitting them, by a 
thorough science-discipline, — in which hand-craft in the lower class- 
es is made a prominent feature, — for the successful and honor- 
able performance of the responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline of 
the students in endeavoring to train them to habits of accu- 
rate scientific thought and thus qualify them for the duties of 
life, whatever their vocation may be, their moral and christian 
training will always constitute the prominent care and thought 
of the Faculty. 



8 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR 

INSTRUCTION 
The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory in- 
struction in applied science in the following departments; 

L-IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres and is supplied with illustrative 
specimens of stock of select varieties. 

By act of tbe legislature the office of the Commissioner of 
Agriculture and the Experiment Station for the state of Ala- 
bama are located at Auburn. The Professor of agriculture is 
also Director of the experiment station, and the Professor of 
chemistry is state chemist to the department of agriculture, 
whose duty it is to analyze fertilizers for the benefit of the 
general agricultural interests of the atateT f 

This public work done at Auburn in behalf of the agricul- 
tural and industrial interests oi the state affords to students an 
unusual opportunity to become familiar with its agriculture, its 
defects and remedies. 

The Experiment Station is not a model km, but a place 

where experiments and scientific investigations in agriculture 

fire made at the puWic expense for the common good, and where 

the young men at the college receive instruction in the methods 

applied. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc. where lectures are 
delivered in presence of the objects discussed. 

U-IN MECHANIC ARTS 

The Mechanic Art Laboratory isiised as an auxiliary in indus- 
trial education, to instruct in the arts that constitute the founda- 
tion of various industrial pursuits, thus aiding in giving mentally 
and manually, in theory and practice, that sound education that 
will in a measure qualify a young man to enter upon some one oi 
the associated industries; that education which trains the 
eye and the hand as well as the mind, and tends to associate skil- 



AOWCULTORAL AKD HBCHAKICAL COlXWi* 



y\ 



*hm 



led manaal and mental labor. This laboratory is now well equip- 
ped in the wood and iron department. 

The wood department in located is a commodious hall 90 x 50 
feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse power Corliss En- 
gine with indicator, a planer, circular saw, band saw, two scroll 
saws, a bun planer, twenty stands with lathes, with fall sets of 
lathe and carpentry tools required for instruction. 

A brick building with two rooms, each 30 x 35 feet, has recent- 
ly been constructed, especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with twelve forges, and tools required 
for a forge department, the other with a cupola furnace, having a 
capacity of 400 pound*, a core oven, moulding benches and sple- 

cial tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge ancl foundry rooms are furnished with a Sturtevant 
fan and exhauster supplied with power from the engine. 

The machine department will be thoroughly completed next 
year; the liberal appropriation made by the state legislature ren- 
dering this possible. 

The Weston dynamo of five horse power, used for furnishing 

electricity to the laboratories and for lighting the halls, is located 
in the large hall of the Mechanic Art laboratory. 

The work performed by the students is instructive in character 
as in any other college laboratory, the classes are taught in sections 
under the supervision of the pressor. There is no attempt to 
teach students skUl in constructing special articles nf commercial 
value, but all exercises are systematically arranged and designed 
for purposes of education. 

HI in fRACTJCAL CHEM8TRY 

The chemical laboratory is well supplied with apparatus and 
facilities for instruction in practical chemistry. It is provided 
with gas and water, a steam boiler for heating, etc., with filtering 
pumps, six analytical balances, and working tables for each stu- 
dent. 

It is situated in the first story of the main building and occupies 
six rooms, one for special agricultural analysis, besides two small 
balance rooms. 



10 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

1V IN PHYSICS 

(j, This department has had valuable additions made to its,appaim- 
*3 tot, in *!wtricity, magnetism. heat*tc. There has recently been 
HoradcW a.T<H5pJer-Holte Electric machine, Gramme ipac^ine, Rue- 
lo ajfeflt's Physipul Balamce, Jamin's magnets, etc,;, with the pecessary 
apparatus fqr « ,ekw^tary physical laboratory. Electricity will 
^rto^^ap^ied^^^^by the dynamo is tl^e .mechanic ar^ labora- 
\t ' tejry « r^ •« ■ '■ .■'■■■>;•«■ ;,•.... •,.,•.,.•=•• . ••••« ■' 

|> I '*>'•!. ^>>i ,: : V— -IN BOTANY. ' : >' 

* .Besides tfye^^rved' specimens of plants, grasses e^c'., this de- 
partment is provided with Auzoux's beautiful Clastic modeh of 
f ' / s?eds and flo^ere for teaching Botany. The botanical laboratory 
*"/ is provided .'jritfc tables and .ten Peck's micn^opes for the use of 

..W <*ttt&*J ■••• \.,-V*-MN Hi* KRAl^GJfi ANB GEOLOO Y. 

Ip this department the collections for illustration are quite ex- 
Wfcqtofiji, A m Kmi»itia morft than 20.000 SDecittteiis all well arranged in 



to-v-wim 



ttii^ embracing more than 20,000 spectoteiis all well arranged in 
u g\m cases. ' ' ' ! * ;>->'*«*•* ' : •* 

WT#i The cabinet J» aho provided frith a very complete collection 
««r? > of finefyroounted* skeletons of Mammalia J prepared by Professor 
Ward of Rochester N. Yi embracing the dolphin, sea lion, 



1) 



f/fi 



r 



t'ip 



horse, dow, *siieep, dog* bear, kangaroo, ?ourang-outang r raan. 

Vn— IN ENGINEERING, 8CRVEY1NG ETC, 

This department, having recently had valuable additions made 
to its equipment, is now well supplied with instruments, with 
which all important field work is taught. 



> i« 






Vin IN DRAWING. 



All the Students in the lower classes are required to take drawing, 
a study which tends to discipline the mind, as well as to train 
the feye and hand to accuracy of observation and execution. Well 
lighted drawing rooms are provided with suitable tables. For the 
advanced students there are individual tables adjustable to differ- 
ent heigh ts and angles of inclination. 



— — 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 11 

DC.- IN PRINTING AND T1LEGRAPHY, 

The printing office is supplied with a new Gordon Press, different 
fonts of type, and stands for twelve students. In the same room 
are the instruments for teaching Telegraphy, 

X-IN MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity with the 
act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of regular military 
drill, and in addition, the military system is used as a ineans of 
enforcing discipline and securing good or>ler, promptness and regu- 
larity in the performance of academic duties. 

This department is under the charge of Lieut. M. C. Richards 

2nd Artillery U. S. A. 

It has recently been supplied with new cadet muskets and 
accoutrements for the corps, % and for artillery practice, with two 
three inch rifle guns, carriages- and limbers. } 



T 



THE COLLEGE BUILDING. 



■ ,^ 



This is a handsome well constructed brick building one hundred 
and sixty by seventy five feet, containing in all thirty eight rooms. 

This building is not used for dormitories for students, but is appro- 
priated for purposes of instruction. It contains the lecture rooms 
and offices of all the professors, the laboratories, &*inets, assembly 
room, printing office and two large well furnished society halli 
with their library and committee rooms. 

All the lecture rooms are provided with modern college fur- 
niture. 

LANGDON HALL. 

• 

This is a two story building ninety by fifty feet, recently con- 
structed. The second story is the audience hall used for com- 
mencement, and other public occasions. 

The first sttry is appropriated to the Mechanic Art Laboratory 



MM 






GRADUATES. 

4b 

With degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) 



Class of 1886. 



Gilmer Alexander Allison. 
Benjamin Sullivan Burton, 
Luther Martin Cappe. 
Lawson Franklin Howell. 
Clifford Lewis Newman. 
Augustus Archilous Persons. 
Sterling Chambers Pitts. 



Charles Hunter Roes. 
Robert Jasper Hogue Simmons. 
Robert Billupe Smith. 
Leckenski Ware Spratling 
Dudley Sanders Weaver. 
Levi Washington Wilkinson. 
Thomas Peters Zellere. 



With degree of Master at Science (Hon.) 

Benjamin B. Ross. 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS- 

AWARDED HONOR CERTIFICATES IK 1886. 



The students of each class, who secure a grade above 90 in three 

or more different subjects, are distinguished for 

excellence in scholarship, and are awarded 

Honor Certificates. 



FIRST CLASS. 

Gilmer Alexander Allison. Sterling ChanWs Pitts. 



Benjamin Sullivan Burton, 
Lawson Franklin Howell. 
Clifford Lewis Newman- 
Augustus Archilous Persons. 



Charles Hunter Ross. 
Robert Jasper Hogue Simmons. 
Dudley Sanders Weaver. 
Levi Washington Wilkinson. 



Thomas Peter Zellers. 



SECOND CLAS8. 

Vaasar Lyle Allen. George Holt Lamar, 

Wilson Herbert Newman. 



George Fleming Broun, 
Henry Lee Broun. 
Alonzo Francis Cory. 
David Miller Driver. 
Edmund Wiley Foster. 



THIRD CLASS. 



Edwin Conway Macartney. 
James Monroe Mason. 
Arthur Wesley Oliver. 
Thadeus Joseph Partridge. 
William Russell Phillips. 



Otis Oliver Smith. 



FOURTH CLASS. 

Howard Alburn Bedell. Alexander Dowling McLennan 

Boiling Hall Crenshaw. Hugh McGhee Taylor. 

Georg* Watts Hearn. Paul Turner Vaughan, 

Thomas Morgan Watlington. 



^ 



Catalogue of Students 

FOR THE SESSION 188&-'87. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



Nam*. 

Allison, Gilmer Alexander. 

A. A M. College. 

Blakey, Boiling Anthony. 

Univ. Ala. 

Howell, Lawson Franklin. 

A. & M. College. 

Lamar, Howard, 

A. & M. College. 

Mell, Charles Irwin. 

Univ. Ga. 

Morgan, James William, Jr. 

State Normal College 

Newman, Clifford Lewis. 

A. A M. College. 

Persons, Augustus Archilous 

A. & M. College. 

Pitts, Sterling Chambers. 

A. & M. College. 

Wilkinson, Levi Washington 

A. & M. College. 



County, 

Lee 



Montgomery 



Lee 



Lauderdale 
Lee 



<c 



Russell 
Dale 



rarer class 



• Alexander, Arthur John. 

Allen, Vasser Lyle. 
% Armstrong, Henry Clay. 

Barclay, Alexander Campbell. 

Boykin, Burwell Lee. 

Davis, William Easly, 

Jones, Roger ap Catesby. 

Jones, Thomas Hugh. 

Lamar, George Holt. 

Lloyd, Edward Read. 
3 Morgan, James William Jr. 

Newman, Wilson Herbert, 

Perry, Frank Howard. 

Simmons, Cqarles Woodward 



Mobile 

Montgomery 

Lee 

Lawrence 

Dallas 

Lee 

Dallas 

Lee 

CI 

ii 

Lauderdale 
Lee 



<( 



Stats. 

Ala. 

« 

Geo. 
Ala. 
Geo. 
Ala. 

u 

tt 
a 



Ala, 



Dale 



A 



« 
it 
a 
it 
H 
it 

4« 
ft 

tt 

€t 
ti 



" " AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



•■:.TK 



Bennett, Robert L6ver 
; Broun, George Fleming. 
Broun, Edmund Fontaine, 
Broun, Henry Lee. ' 
' Clower, John Robertson. 
Cory, Alouzo Francis. 
.*P Drake, John Hodges Jr. 
«££ Driver, David Miller. 
' Dozier, Nathan Oweni 
Foster, Edmund Wiley. 
Gregory, John Thomas. 
Harris, Eugene Willis. 
Hearn, George Watts* 
Huguley, George Abnfer 
Lyman, William. 
Macartney, Edwin Conway. 
Mason, Jame* Monroe. 
Oliver, Arthur Wesley 
Partridge, Thaddeus Joseph. 
Persons, Henry Stanford. 
Samford, Thomas Drake 



SECOND CLASS 
County-: 



m* 



». 



Lee 



b 



Lee ! 
Autauga 
Lee- 
Dallas 
Tftlltfpoosa 
Mobile 
Lauderdale 
Lee 



Shelby 

Mobile 

Barbour 

Lee 

Mobile 

Lee 



c« 



u 



Montgomery 
Jefferson 



Smith, Otis Oliver, 
Taylor, Samuel Oliver 

Terry, William Kerr. 

THIRD CLA38. 

Abernethy, Heustes Barrette. Jefferson 

Andrews, William Thomas. 

Beddell, Howard Alburn. 

Beddell, Paul. 1 

Bishop, Burton Mell. 

Boyd, Thomas Jackson. 

Brooks, Thomas John. 
Burdett, Leslie Dallas. 
Burr, A^on Jason. t . 
Cochran, Edmund Collins. 
Cory, Charles Morria. 
Crawford, Abednego Jackson. 



Lee 
ii 

9 

Lee 



r 

Mobile 

Autauga 

Lee 



i * 



1 15 



Stati. 

Tex. 

Va. 

West Va. 

Va. 

Ala. 

it 

l» 

<< 
tl 

ti 
ii 

» 

Geo. 
AU- 

• I 

ii 
i< 
(« 
It 
ii 
II 

u% 

ii 



Geo. 
Ala. 

Geo. 
Ala. 

Geo. 

•• 

ii 

Ala. 
it 

ii 



. t * 



•v- 



16 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHA 



Name. 

Crenshaw, Boiling Hall. 

Crowder, Arthur Campbell. 

Crowder, Howard Grayson. 

Doster, Howard Staten. 

Dryer, Percival Lewis. 

Dunlap, Walter "Davis. 

Dunstan, Arthur StCharles. 

Harris. George William. 

High, James ( !lar«nce 

Hightower, John Hilliard. 

Hutchinson, Pleasant Lee. 

Irvin, John Reuben. 

Jones, Egbert 

Killebrew, Oscar Don. 

Lloyd, Andrew Manly. 

Levy, Clarence Lionel. 

McLennan, Alexander Dowling. 

McMillan, Robert Houston. 

McVoy, Leonard Kent. 

Milchei, Tennant Lomax. 
Moragne. Joseph Hugh. 
Philips, Frank. 
Powers, Edward Clyde. 
Quarles, John Washington. 
Rice, Rufus Jackson. 
Riggs, Robertson. 
Robertson, Walter Lee. * 
Robinson, Joe Huguley. 
Rowe, John Albert. 
Sankey, Prank Emmett. 
She! ton, Joseph Augustus- 
Smith, Lawrence Avery, 
Spratling, Edgar Johnson. 
Staten, William Thomas. 
Story, Alonzo Grove. 
Taylor, Hugh McGhee. 
Thrash, Daniel Mathew. 



V 



ECHA1|ICAL COLLEGE 


i 


County 


STA'K 


Butler 


Ala.v 


St. Clair 

u 


ii 
14 


Autauga * 


§4 


Macon 


ti 

* 


Dallas 


II 


Shelby 


II 


* 


Geo. 


Bullock 


Ala. 


Lee 


*« 




Geo. 


Tallapoosa 


Ala 




Geo. 


Dale 


Ala. 


Lee 


(1 


^ * 


Geo. 


Barbour 


Ala. 


Talladega 


i« 


Dallas 


ii 


Russell 


* " . 


Calhoun 


a 




Fla. 


Lee 


Ala. 


Cl*y 


U 


Lee 


it 


Dallas 


14 


Jefferson 


II 


Chambers 


U 


Tallapoosa 


41 


Montgomery 


ii 


Lee 


%i 


Chambers 

• 1 . 


ii 


Lowndes ' 


ii 

.4 


Tajladega 


- •* 

** 


Montgomery 


1 


Dallas 


• I 



4 '' 



ma 



s 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



Name. 


Cod nt y. 


Tuttle, Montague Hart. 


Macon 


Tuttle, Mortimer Hart. 


ii 


Vaugha , Paul Turner. 


Dallas 


Vernon /'Frederick Henry. 


Chambers 


Wa.ker, James. 


« 


Watlington, Thomas Morgan. 


Marengo 


Weaver, Nprman Rutherford. 


Dallas 


FOURTH CLASS 


Abernethy, Benjamin Cheny. 


Jefferson 


Anderson, Albert Massey 


Montgomery 


Aihur^t, James Henderson. 


Tallapoosa 


Betts, Victor. 


fc Madison 


Boyd, Douglass 


, 


Browder, David. 


Moutgomery 


Burnett, John Stokeley. 


• * 


Chambers, James McCoy. 


Montgomery 


Conner, Robert David. 


Macon 


Cooper, Houston Franklin. 




Curry, Thomas Murrey. 


Talladega 


Davidson, William. 




Drake, Joseph Emory. 




Fobta ue, Frank Maury. 




Glenn, Charles Bowles. 


Lee 


Hall, Dorian. 


Lowndes 


Haralson, Hugh Anderson. 


Dallas 


Harvey, Bryant Clower. 


Lee 


Harris, John Dixon. 


Chambers 


Harrison, William Groce. 


Talladega 


Holland, Edward Bell. 




Horst, Martin. 


Mobile 


Hudson, Belus Ephraim. 


Lee 


Irvin, Robert Edward Daniel. 


Tallaooosa 

• 


Johnson, Albert Siduey. 


Henry 


Lawson, John Robertson. 


Pike 


Leary, William Merriwether. 


Montgomery 


Leslie, Frank. 




Little, John Hammond. 


Lee 



17 

State, 

Ala. 

ll 
II 
U 
II 
II 
t« 



II 

a 
<• 

%< 

Geo. 
Ala. 
Geo 
Ala 

Geo. 
Ala. 
Geo. 



Ala. 



ii 
It 
(I 

.( 

» i 



Geo. 
Ala. 



«. 
ii 
ii 

i. 

.< 



Scotland. 
Ala 



=3=r~ ii" 



-' 



18 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



;. 



Name. 

Lupton, Frank Allemomj. 
Martin, Thomas Benton Jr. 
McConnell, Frank Percy, 
McMillan, Thomas Martin. 
Milstead, Frank Davia, 
Milton, John. 
Molton, Thomas James. 
Morris, Thomas Avery. 
Noble, Robert Ernest. 
Parhan. Edwin Douglass. 
Pollock, Joseph Francis. 
Pritchett, Edward Hill. 
Riddle, Seldon Jasper. 
Robertson, Howard Payne. 
Robinson, William Walter. 
Ross. Thomas Alexander. 
Scott Nathaniel Jvckson. 
Slocum. John Greenway 
Smith. Thomas Leonard. 
Thomas, Simeon Allen, 
Thorington, Chilton. 
Tuttle. Jerry Claud. 
Warring. George Houston. 
Williams, Madison Jackson. 
Whisnant, Ernest Shelton. 
Woodruff, Ernest Rencher 



Armstrong, Holcombe Hunter .Macon 
Bowie, Leroy William. 
Bradford, Ethelred Ransom. 
Bridges, Charles. 
Carr. Reuben. 
Cason. Frank Lam pton. 
Cawthon. Stephen Colquitt. 
Cawthon, Jefferson Ballon. 
Chapman, Giles Hardy. 



County. 


Stat*. 


Lee 


Ala. 


Montgomery 

Talladega 

Monroe 


a 
it 
ti 


Elmore 


u 




Fla. 


Montgomery 


Ala. 
N.C. 


Calhoun 


Ala. 


Limestone 


€i 


Dallas 


a 


Lowndes 




Etowah 


u 


Lowndes 


it 


Coosa 


u 


Lowndes 


it 




District of Columbia. 


Lee 


Ala. 


Coosa 


a 


u 


a 


Montgomery 
Macon 


a 




Geo. 


Dallas. Co. 


Ala. 


Calhoun 


a 


Sumpter 


a 


LA*S SECTION B. 




.Macon 


Ala. 


Talladega 
Marengo 
Mobile 


a 

u 

it 


Lee 


ti 




La. 




Fla. 


Conecuh 


Ala. 



L 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



» 



Name. 


CODNTY. 


State, 


Drake, Richard 


. 


Geo. 


Dudley, Arthur Thomas. 




Geo. 


Duke, Samuel 


Macon 


Ala. 


Eads, Caswell, Bell. 


Mobile 


ii 


Ellknt, Walter Dallas. 




Geo. 


Harrington, Willam H. 


Macon 


Ala. 


Loeb, lieon. 


Montgomery 


ii 


Montgomery, Harry Best. 


Talladega 


»l 


Noble, Alfred Royall. 


Calhoun 


it 


Nuckols, James Terry. 


Russell 


II 


Robinson, Wyche Jackson. 


Chambers 


U 


Sable, Wiley. 


Montgomery 


II 


Tait, Frank Shropshire. 


Wilcox 


U 


Tate, Charles Cabiness. 


Marengo 


<• 


Todd, George Henry 


Montgomery 


Ii 


Young, George Barret. 




Geo. 


Wimberley, Frank Lee 


Lee 


Ala. 


Zeigler, William James. 


Autauga 


it 



RECAPITULATION. 



Graduate Students. 
First Class. 
Second Class. 
Third Class. 
Fourth Class. 
Fourth Class. 



Sec. A. 
Sec. B. 



10 
13 
24 
56 
56 
27 



Total. 



185 



mmmmm 



1 



20 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 

flUMBtK 0F#TUDENT$IN EJffjr&IBJE&P OF0TUDY. 



•-<$.£>-•<>♦•— 



English, 


172 


History, 


40 


French, 


14 


German, 


10 


Latin, 


44 


Mental Science, 


11 


Political Economy, 


13 


Mathematics 


162 


Chemistry 


85 



Agriculture, 96 

Physics, 71 
Natural History & Geology, 73 

Physiology, 28 

Engineering, 16 

Drawing, 114 

Mechanic Arts, 90 

Printing & Telegraphy, 42 

Military Tactics, * 163 




..r 



r 



/>* 



11 — ^^^^^^^^^^a^mmmmmsmmmm^a^mmma^mmmmm 



Military Organization. 

1886-'87. 

President. 
WM. L*ROY BROUN, 
Commandant, 
MELZAR. C. RICHARDS Lieut. 2nd U. 8. Artillery. 

Surgeon. 
J. H. DRAKE, M. D. 

AsHttant to Commandant vrtth rank of Major. 

CADET C. W. SIMMONS. 

Cadet Captain*. 
V. L. ALLEN. ii 

E. R. LLOYD. 
W. H. NEWMAN. 

Cadet Lieut. & Adjutant. Cadet Lieut. A Quartermaster. 

B. L. BOYKIN. < * G. H. LAMAR. 

Cadet Ut. Lieutenants. Cadet 2nd Lieutenants. 

T. H. JONES. W. E. DAVIS. 

F. H. PERRY. H. L. BROUN. 

R. ap C. JONES. H. S. PERSONS- 

T. D. SAMFORD. 
A. F. CORY. r 
G. A. HUGULEY.. 

Cadet Sergeant Major. Cadet Q.M. & Color Sergeant. 

J.U. DliAKE, Jr. E. C. MACARTNEY. 

Cadet 1st, Sergeants. 
G. F. BROUN. 
R. L. BENNETT. 
E. W. HARRIS. 

Cadet 8erge&nts. Cadet Corporate. 

O. O. SMITH. *. RIGGS. 

E. W. FOSTER. B. H. CRENSHAW. 

FONTAINE BROUN. M. H. TUTTLE. 

J. T. GREGORY. G. H. TUTTLE. 

W. K. TERRY, H. M. TAYLOR. 

Wm. LYMAN. P. T. VAUGHAN, Jr. 

A. W. OLIVER. J- A. ROWE. 
8. TAYLOR. 

Cadet Color Corporate . 
W. T. 8TATEN. 
L. A. SMITH. 

F. PHILIPS. 

J. W. QUARLES. 
H. CROWDER. 
F. H. VERNON. 
J. H. MORAGNE. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



Applicants for admission must be of good moral character. To 
enter the fourth class the applicant must be not less than fifteen 
years of age, and be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination 
in the following subjects: 

1. Geography and History of the United States. 

2. English. — (a) An examination upon sentences containing in- 
correct English, (b) A composition giving evidence of satisfactory 
proficiency in spelling, punctuation, grammar, and division into 
paragtaphs. 

3. Mathematics — (a) arithmetic, including fundamental opera- 
tions; common and decimal fractions; denominate numbers, the 
metric system; percentage, including interest and discount; propor- 
tion ; extraction of square and cube roots; (b) algebra, to quad- 
ratic equations. 

For admission to the fourth class in the General Course a satis- 
factory examination will also be required in Latin grammar and 
Caesar (4 books.) 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on the 15th, of September, 
the day on which the session opens. 

Applicants, who are not fully prepared to stand the entrance ex- 
aminations for full admission to the Fourth Class, including those 
of fourteen years of age, are admitted to the sub-college depart- 
ment, which includes the Fourth class, Sec. B. 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report immediately 
to the President, No student will be admitted to a recitation in 
any class previous to matriculation. 









— — — — — -™— — — _ -_— — — i _— ^^^MH^HHMiHHMHHBIMIHi^iW 



k 



NUMBER OF EXERCISES. 



All students are required to have not less than fifteen recitation? 
per week or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in labor- 
atory work, drawing and military drill. 

6PECIAL STUDENTS. 

Students who are qualified to prosecute the studies of the Second 
class, and those over twenty one years of age who are not candidates 
for a degree, are permitted to take, with the advice of the Faculty, 
the subjects of study they may prefer and for which they may be 
qualified ; all other students will be assigned to one of the regular 
prescribed courses of study, unlete-otherwise ordered by the Faculty. 
Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations in 
any one study become special students. 

They will be classed a? regular students, pursuing a course for a 
degree, whenever they can pass the examinations in those subjects 
in which they were found deficient. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
the courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and Natural 
Sciences with their applications ; Agriculture, Mechanics, As- 
tronomy, Mathematics Engineering, Drawing. English, French, 
German and Latin Languages, History, Political Economy, 

Mental and Moral Science. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to offer a lib- 
eral and practical education as a preparation for the active pur- 
suits of life. 



24 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



There are three Degree courses, for undergraduates, each leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and requiring four 
years for its completion: 

I COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

II — COURSE IN MECHANIC8 AND ENGINEERING. 
HI—GENERAL COUR8E. 

There are also two partial courses; each requiring two years for 
its completion : 

IV -TWO YE AOTt&UltSE IN AGRICULTURE. 
V — TWO YEAR'8 COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

Course I. includes theoretical and practical instruction in those 
branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and is especially 
.adapted to those who propose to devote themselves to agriculture or 
.chemical pursuits. 

• 

Course II. includes the principles and applications of the science 
that directly relate to civil and mechanical engineering, and is 
adapted to those who expect to eqter the profession of engineer- 
ing. 

Course II [. has been arranged to give a general and less technical 
education in subjects of science and language to meet the wants 
of those students who have selected no definite vocation in life, as 
well as of those who propose ultimately to engage in teaching, or 
in some commercial or manufacturing business. 

Course IV. and V. have been arranged for the benefit of those 
students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, are not able 
to continue at college four years and take one of the regular degree 
courses, , 

Students who complete either of these two year courses, will, on 
passing a satisfactory examination, receive certificates indicating 
their attainments. 

When all of the departments in the School of Mechanic Arts are 
provided with the necessary appliances it is designed to arrange a 
more extended course in Mechanical Engineering. 



— 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



25 



COURSE IN PHARMACY. 
The following resolution was adopted by the trustees: 

"That the faculty are hereby authorized and directed to arrange as early as practi- 
cable a special course of instruction in Pharmacy, adapted to qualify young men 
by systematic work in chemistry and other sciences, to become practical pharmacists 
mid chemicaYnianufacturers. 

Students who expect to become practical pharmacists can en- 
ter upon a special course of Chemistry and Natural History and 
occupy all of their time in the laboratories of these departments 
under the immediate direction of the Professors. 

COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

Students who have received the degree ofB. Sc. in Engineering, 
or who have prosecuted an equivalent course of study, can enter 
upon a special course of Mining Engineering which includes the 
following subjects of study, and will require a residence of one 
vear: 

Industrial Chemistry, — Assaying, Reduction of ores, Mineralogy 
Economic Geology, Mining machinery, Drifting, Tunnelling, 
Timbering, Ore-Dressing, and the various operations connected 
with the exploitation of mines. 

This course of study will be under the charge of the Professors 
of Chemistry, Engineering, and Natural History. 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature in the 
courses of education provided for the students of this college, and 
as far as possible all students are required to enter upon laborato- 
ry work in some one department. 
Laboratory instruction is given in the following departments: . 

I Chemistry. 

H — Physics. 

Ill — Engineering; Field Work. 

IV- — Agricultural Engineering & Purveying- 

V Agriculture. 

VI — Natural History. 

VII — Technical Drawing. 

VIII-Mechanic Arts. 

IX — Printing a Telegraphy. 






26 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

I—COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 
3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 



FOURTH CLASS 

Second and Third Terms. 

4. English. 

1. Agriculture. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physiology. 
3. Drawir.g. 
3. Mec hanic Art LabWy. 

Military Drill. 

THIRD CLASS. 



First Term. 

5. English 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill 



First Term, 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Industrial, Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 

4. Natural History/laboratory.) 
1. Military Science a Tactics. 

Chemical Laboratory. 
Practical Agriculture. 
Military Drill. 



• First Term. 

2. English Literature. 

2. Mental Science. 

2. Physics. 

4. Natural History. 

2. Agriculture. 

2. Agricultural Chemistry. 

1. Military Science & Tactics, 

Chemical Laboratory. 

Practical Agriculture 



Second and Third Terms. 

3, English 

2. Botany. ' 
5. Mathematics. 

3, General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 

Mech. Art Lab. (2d. t'm) 
Practical Agriculture. 
Military Drill. 

SECOND CLASS 

Second and Third Terms. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 

4. Natural History (lab'try.) 

1 . Military Science & Tactics 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Practical Agriculture. 
Military Drill. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Second and Third Terms. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Moral Science. 
2. Astronomy. 
4. Natural History. 
2. Agriculture. 
2, Agricultural Chemistry. 
1. Military Science* Tactics 

Chemical Laboratory, 
Practical Agriculture. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 27 

II-COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 

FOURTH CLASS. 



First Term, 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 
3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

First Term. 

5. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry, , 
3. Agriculture, (a) 
5. Drawing* 

3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics, 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science & Tactics. 

Laboratory & Field work. 
Military Drill. 

First Term. 
2. , English Literature. 

2. Physics. 

2. Natural History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 



Second and Third 'lewis. 

4. English, 

1. Agriculture. 

2. History. 

5, Mathematics. 
5. Latin. 

3. Drawibg. 
3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

THIRD CLASS. 

Second and Third Terms. 
3. English. 

2. Botany. 
5. Mathematics 
3 General Chemistry. 

3. Agriculture, (a) 

5. Drawing, 
. h. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

SECO D CLASS 

Second and Third Terms. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

5. Engineering, 

5. Drawing 

1. Military Science & Tactics. 
Laboratory $£ Field work. 
Military Drill. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Second and Third Terms. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Astronomy. 

2, Natural History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 



L Military Science & Tactics. 1. Military Science & Tactics. 




w~ 



28 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

III.— GENERAL COURSE. 

FOURTH CLA88. 

Second and Third Terms. 

4. English, 
t. Agriculture. 

2. History. 

5, Mathematics. 
5. Latin. 

3. Drawing. 
3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

THIRD CLASS. 

Second and Third Terms. 
5. Latin. 

2. Botany. 
5. Mathematics. 
3 General Chemistry. 

3. Drawing, 
Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 

SECOsD CLASS. 

Second and Third Terms. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

5. French. 

3. Latin. 

2. Natural History. 

1 Military Science & Tactics. 

Laboratory work, 

Military Drill. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Second and Third Terms. 
2. Political Economy. 
2. Moral Science, 
2, Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French, 
5. German. 



First Term. 
3. English. 

2. Historv. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Latin. 

3. Drawing. 
3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 

Military Drill. 

First Term. 
5, Latin. 

2. English. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry, 
J*. Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 

2. Physics. 
5. Mathematics, 

3. Latin. 
2. Natural History. 

1. Military Science & Tactics. 
Laboratory work. 
Military Drill. 

First' Term. 

2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 

2. Natural History, 

3. French. 
5. German. 



L Military Science A Tactics. ?! Military Science & Tactics. 



t= 



__ 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



29 



V— TWO YEAR'S COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

FIRST YEAR. 



tirst ^erm, 
3. English, 
6. Mathematics. 
5 Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



Second and Third Term*. 

4. English. 

1. Agriculture 

5. Mathematics 

3 Elementary Physiology 



6. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 3. Drawing. 



Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing 



6. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second and Third Terms. 
3, English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



9. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 6. Mechanic Art Laboratory, 



Military Drill. 



Military Drill. 




IV-^-TWO YEAR'S COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 



FIRST YEAR. 



s First Term, 
3. English. 
3, Mathematics. 
5. Elementary Physics. 
3. Agriculture. 
3 Drawing. 
3, Mechanic Art Laboratory 

Practical Agriculture. 

Military Drill, 

Firxt Term. 
3. English. 
3. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 

4. Natural History. 
Practical Agriculture. 
Military Drill. 



Second and Third Terms. 
5. English. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. Elementary Physiology. 
3. Agriculture. 

2. Botany. 

3. Mechanic Art Laboratory. 
Practical Agriculture 
Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second and Third Terms. 
3. English. 
3. Mathematics. 

3, General Chemistry.. 
2: Agriculture. 

4. Natural History 
Practical Agriculture 
Military Drill. 







T 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 



PHYSICS ANP ASTRONOMY. 

t 

President Broun. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text books and lec- 
tures, illustrated by experiments. The first part of the course 
is ocupied with Elementary Rational Mechanics, treated 
graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of Molecular Mechanics, 
while iue prominence is given to principles, frequent reference is 
made to the applications of science. 

The studies of the second class include the properties of matter, 
units of measure, force, work, energy; kinematics, kinetics, 
mechanic powers, friction, pendulum; molecular forces of solids 
liquids and gases; theory of undulationr, heat, electricity, mag- 
netism ; etc. 

The studies of the First Class include Electricity and its applica- 
tions; Optics, Astronomy and Meteorology, 

Text Books — in Physics Atkinson's Ganot; — in Astronomy 
Newcomb, & White. 

Mathematics. 
Prof. Smith. 

The general course for the first two years embraces the first year, 
Algebra, and Geometry six books; second year, Solid Geometry. 
Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Surveying, Mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained, first, mental discipline ; 
second, a thorough knowledge of the practical applications of pure 
mathematics. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given in the third class 
iu farm, town afcd goverment land surveying, dividing land, map- 
ping, plotting and computing of areas, etc., also in the theory, 
adjustment and use of instruments. 

The class in sections of six or eight, devote three afternoons a 
week during the second term, to field practice. 



— 



■■ 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



31 



Mensuration includes an extended course in measurements of 
heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and curvilinear figures,, 

surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, lays the 
foundation for the pure and applied Mathematics of the Mechani- 
cal and Engineering Course. Analytical Geometry, Descriptive 
Geometry and Cateulus are pursued in the Engineering course. 
Especial attention is given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course.instruction in text books is supplement- 
ed by lectures. Solutions of original practical problems are requir- 
ed of the student, to make him familiar with the application of 
principles studied. TextBooil , ' 

Olney's and Wentworth's Algebra, Wen North's Geometry, 
Schuylers' Surveying, Loomis' Analytical Geometry, Warren's 
Descrip live Geometry, Loomis' aud Taylor's Calculus. 

NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. . 

Prof. Mell. 

Geol ogy —This subject is studied in the senior class. 

Special attention is given to the Geology of Alabama The 
course is given by text books and lectures, illustrated bf means 
of diagrams, maps, models and various rocks ^T^K^ 
non-fLiliferous to be found in the Geological Cabinet. Atten- 
tion is given to the nature and origin of ore deposits, mineral 
springs, and origin and geolgical relations of soils. 

Zoology.-A systematic arrangement of the Animal Kingdom 
in accordance with natural affinities, is made a special feature of 
the instruction. Particular attention is also given to >n^nju- 
rous to vegetation, their habits, and the methods best adapted for 

checking their ravages. - 

Botany.-The students of the Third Class begm tiie study of 

Botany, and continue it through the second term. Analytical 
wo k is made an important feature. This Class is provided with 
plants from the neighboring fields, and taught how to determine 
their specific names. The work is sufficiently exhaustive to en- 
able the student, after completing the course, to name any of the 
ordinary weeds and grasses that he will encounter in this section. 



32 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



In the Secoird Class an amount of time is devoted to systematic 
and structural Botany, and to advanced laboratory work with the 
microscope, in the preparation of specimens showing plant structure, 
sufficient to familiarize the students not only with the methods of 
plant building and cellular organization, but also to practise them 
in detecting the various forms of fungi that are injurious to fruits 
and vegetables. A Biological Laboratory has been fitted up for 
students, provided with excellent microscopes of the most improved 
patterns, well constructed tables, and all the necessary chemicals 
for preparing and mounting vegetable tissues. A dark room i< at- 
tached to this laboratory for micro-photographic work. 

The teaching of Botany is greatly facilitated by the use of Au- 
zoux's, complete set of clastic models of plants. 

Physiology. —This subject is taught to the students of the Fourth 
class, and is completed in the second term of the session. The text 
is illustrated by models and microscopical sections projected on the 
screen. 

Text Books. 

Le Conte's Geology, Holder's Zoology, Bessey's Botany, Apgar'n 
Plant Analysis, Martin's Human Body. 

ALABAMA WEATHER SERVICE. 

The United States' Signal Service has established in Alabama a 
state sytem for collecting meteorological data relating to climatic 
changes. The service is now in successful operation with the cen- 
tral office located at this Institute. Bulletins are issued at the close 
of each month, compiled from reports sent the Director from num. 
erous stations scattered throughout the State. An opportunity is 
thus offered the student* in Meteorology of becoming familiar with 
the system so long successfully operated by the Department at 
Washington. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

Professor Lane. 

CIVll ENGINEERING 

The special studies of this department begin in the Second Class 
and require a good knowledge of Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry 
and Analytical Mechanics They are as follows: 

Second Class— Simple, compound.reversed and parabolic curves 
turnoutsand crossings, leveling, gradients, setting slope stakes lo- 
cation and construction of common roads and railroads. 



s 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



33 



* 



First Class, — Classification, appearances, defects, reasoning, 
durability and preservation of timber; classification and description, 
of natural building stones ; bricks concretes; cast and wrought iron, 
steel and other metals; limes, cements, mortars their manufac- 
ture; paints and other preservatives; classification of strains and 
a general mathematical discussion of the same ;jointsand fastening. 
solid and open built beams; classification, construction ami 
mechanics of masonrv; foundations on land and water; bridges 
and roots of different kinds, their construction and strains deter- 
mined mathematically and graphically; common roads, their ' 
coverings, location and construction; location and construction 'M' 
railroads: navigable, irrigation and drainage canals; river a -id sea- 
coast improvements. * 

Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

For practical work, this Department has been supplied with two 
transits, one having the solar attachment, two engineers' levels, u 
farmer's level, two surveyor's compares, a railroad compass 
sextant, pocket sextant, aneroid barometer, Abney hand 
level and clinometer, and other instruments 

Thelibrary has been supplied with books of reference. 

Text Books. 

Second Class -Henck's Field Book for' Railway Engineering 

Gillespie's Roads, and Rail Roads. ... 

First Glass, -Wheeler's Civil Engineering. Von Olfs Graphic 

Statics " drawino. 

All of the students of the Third -and Fourth classes are re- 
quired to take Drawing; but only the students in Mechanics and 
Engineering, in the First and Second classes. 

The Fourth class is taught linear drawing and elementary 
graphical mechanjesT The Third class U instructed in the prin- 
ciples of orthographic aud isometric projections, shades and shad- 
ows, practical perspective and tinting. In the Second class, the 
instruction embraces a more extended course in orthographic and 
isometric drawing, perspective, shades and shadow,, and tinting ; 
also sketches of tools and machines, plans, elevations and cross- 
sections of buildings. The First class make typography draw- 
ings and drawings of machines, roofs bridges, etc to different 
scales. Plans, profiles and sections of railroad surveys complete 
the instruction in this department. 



— «— 



34 



j 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



The ilrawiug rooms are furnished with adjustable tables with 
black walnut tops aud iron stands, Schroeder's and other models, 
French, German, English and American plates of roofs, bridges 
masonary, tools machines etc. etc. 

Text Books': 

Fourth Class, — Davidson's Linear Drawing, Broun's Elementary 
Graphical Mechanics. 

Third Class, — Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical 
' Perspective. 

Second Class, — Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's 
Drawing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the 
college. 

First Class, — French, German, English and American Plates 
belonging to the College. 

AGRICULTURE. 

Prof. Newman. 

Instruction in this department commences with the Fourth Class 
and continues through the other three Classes. The sub- 
ject is taught principally by lecturer in which it is treated as an ap- 
plied science, and by the application of the teachings of the natural 
sciences to the art of agriculture, using the farm of the Experi- 
ment Station as a laboratory for the practical illustration df the 
lecture room instruction. 

The classes accompany the professor into the field, garden, or- 
chard, vineyard, the green house and stock yard, where lectures 
are delivered in the presence of the work in progress, the objects 
and results of experiments explained, the propagation, planting, 
pruning and cultivation of plants illustrated, and so far as deem- 
ed necessary for thorough instruction, opportunity is given to 
students in agriculture to perform manual labor in any and every 
department of the farm. 

Every principle and theory taught in the lecture room will be 
thoroughly illustrated and exemplified on the farm. 



AGRICULTURAL EXERIMENT STATION. 

J. 8, Newman, Director, 

The state Agricultural Experiment Station is connected with the 
College. 



-V**.'.|. ■*\n r ,-<* ' 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 35 

The farm of the station is adjacent to the College buildings and 
is used by the professor of agriculture to illustrate his lecture room 
instruction. Here a great variety of experiments ill Agricultnre 
Horticulture, stock breeding an 1 feeding will serve not only the 
purposes of instruction to the students, but will afford valuable 
information to the farmers of the State. 

Bulletins are issued through the State Department of 
Agriculture and widely distributed over the State by the Commis- 
sioner. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Professor Lupton, Assistants, Wilkinson and Burton. 

Instruction in this department embraces — 

1. A course of lectures in General Chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in Industrial Chemist™. 



3. A course oflectures in Agricultural Chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with each course of 
lectures for the practice of chemical analysis and chemical research. 

„ 1. Course in General Chemistry. This consists of a series of 
lectures (three per week ) extending throughout the entire session 
and includes a discussion of the fundamental principles of Chemi- 
stry Philosophy in connection with the history, preparation, prop- 
erties,and compounds of the metallic and non-metallicelements with 
the main facts and principles of Organic Chemistry. In this course 
the more common applications of Chemistry to the Arts and Manu- 
factures are discussed. The apparatus used for experimental illus- 
tration is extensive, containing the newest and most approved instru- 
ments necessary forpresenting the subject in the most attractive and 
instructive form, 

. Reference-books: Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, 
Remsen, Cook's Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. The lectures on Industrial Chemistry (three per week) ex- 
tend throughout the session, and include a discussion in detail of the 
procese s and chemical principlesi nvolved in the most important 
applications of Chemistry in the Arts and Manufactures in the re- 
duction of ores, the preparation of materials for food and drink for 
clothing, shelter, heating, illumination, cleansing, purifying, writ- 
ing, printing, ect. 



:*6 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



These Lectures are amply illustrated by means of suitable speci- 
mens or raw materials and manufacturing products, together with 
models and diagrams. 

Reference books: Wagner's Chemical Technology , Muspratt's 
Chemistry as applied to Arts and Manufacturing, lire's Dictionary, 
Watt's Dictionary, Richardson and Watt's Chemical Technology. 
Percy's Metallurgy. 

3. Course in Agricultural Chemistry: This consists of lectures 
on Chemistry in its applications to Agriculture (two per week) and 
imludes a thorough discussion of the origin, composition, and clas- 
sification of soils, the composition and growth of plants, the sources 
of plant food and how obtained, the improvement of soils the man- 
ufacture and uses of fertilizers, the^ehemical principles involved in 
the rotation of crops, in the feeding of livestock and in the various 
operations carried on by the intelligent andsuecessful agriculturist. 
Both of reference, - Lupton's Elementary Principles of Scien- 
ti'ic Agriculture, Johnson and Cameron's Elements of Agricul- 
tural Chemistry, Storer's Agriculture in relation with Chemistry, 
Scientific Journals, Reports of the United States Department of 
Agriculiure, and the bulletins and reports of the various home and 
foreign Agricultural Departments and Stations, 

4. The course of systematic Laboratory work: This course of 
practical work in the Laboratory is carried on in connection with each 
course of lectures and embraces the practical operation of chem- 
ical analysis and synthesis, being varied somewhat to suit the in- 
dividual object of the student, * 

The Laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. during 
five days in the week, are amply supplied with every thing neces- 
sary for instruction in chemical manipulation, in the qualitative 
and quantitative analysis of soils, fertilizers, minerals, mineral 
waters, technical products, etc., and in the method of prosecuting 
chemical researches. Unusual facilities are offered to students who 
wish to devote their time to the special study of practical chem- 
istry. 

A fee i of $10 per session is charged each student in the Analyt- 
ical Laboratory for the use of apparatus, and for material consumed. 

Each student on entering the Chemical Laboratory is required to 
deposit |6, and ,s furmshed with a work-table, a set of reagent 



^y 



■"■—■-■ 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



37 



Lotties, and the common reagents and apparatus used in qualita- 
tive and quantitative analyses. At the (•lose of the session he 
will be credited with such articles as may be returned in good 
order; the value of those which have been injured or destroyed will 

be deducted from the deposit . . t,wt 

Book* wed: In Qualitative Analysis-Jones, Fresen.us, I latt- 

"In Quantitative Analysis-Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, 
Rickett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assay- 
ing. In Agricultural Chemical Analysis-Church, Frankland. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

These are well adapted to analyticalwork. There are six rooms 
and two balance rooms. The rooms contain a table for eacl stu- 
dent, provided with gas and water facilities, a set of reagent tat- 
tle, and necessary apparatus. The lecture room is 40 by , 40 feet 
, size and is provided with every facility for illustrating lectures 
in size, an p supplied with a boiler, which 

bv experiments, the turnace is suppi „ w i, i fl horft- 

runs the stills, and the water and filter pumps, of the work-labora 

t0 In the balance rooms are balances made by Oertling Verbeck, 
Pickholdt, Troemner and Becker. 

8T in LABORATORY AND LABORATORY OF EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Prof. Lupton, State Chemist. Assts. Wilkerso, and Burton. 
In this laboratory work is donofor the Department of Agricult- 
ure and te Experiment Station. During the present season about 
otlntitative analyses have been made consijmg c .com me - 
,ial fertilizers, marls, phosphates, muck, iron, gold and silver ores, 
• m f„eralwIrsands;Us. Numerous qualitative analyses have also 

^lataratory performs the following work: ^ 
commercial fertilizers, minerals, marls, ores, etc., for the Depart 

ment of Agriculture. 

/nd. Analyses for State Experiment Station. 

3rd Analyses for private parties. 

The Commissioner of Agriculture orders the work done under 
1st .head, the Director of Experiment Station the 2nd., while a 

charge is made for the 3rd. 



38 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

ENGLISH AND LATIN. 

Prof. Thach. 

•Jk. 
*~ * ENGLISH. 

In this department the students are carried through a system- 
atic course of study in the English language and literature. In 
. the courses of study which do not include the ancient classics, a 
full course in English is especially important. It is, therefore, de- 
signed, as much as the time allotted permits, to familiarize these 
students by frequent exercises with the standard authors of the 
language. 

The course of study is as follows : 

Fourth Class.— Three hours a week; study of Grammar; the 
principles of special and general composition, with frequenl brief 
papers illustrating the laws studied. 

Third Class.— Three hours a week; study of style : analysis of the 
selections of prose and poetry; frequent essays on literary and his- 
torical themes. J 

Secona\Class,— .Three hours » week; critical ttudy of English 
Classics; History of English and America Literature; Logic; Essays. 

First Class.— Two hours a week, first term; principle of 
criticism ahd study of English Classics. P 

Weekly exercises in declamation are held in the third class. 

Three orignal orations are required during the year of each 
student in the first and second classes. J 

LATIN. 

a J LiSS. taUght " ' hiS Department are the L ^ n **Wim 

■ • ^ % m ?! 1 f , of instruction are by translation from the Latin tPrt, 

B£w gb ? ^i fr ° m ?" glish lnt0 Latin - T1 * "o Sanf use o? 
black boards adds much to the progress and accuracy ol the s tu- 

L^^^Zsy^tl^f 6 « f ^e princip.es of . 
reading of the futhors iEibSl ^1 " i « COD ° ec ^ on with the • 
Englii derivative; °SJX^ n S ^ to att £ t,on is ^ to 
idioms of the two languages the corresponding 

prmciplesof interptetiran?cl t LTcl 1 : i at,n ' *** ^ the 
Latin authors read: 

Fourth clasfe.— Virgil • Ci<*mVfW^ n 
position. «"> ^<**>b Orations; Grammar and Corn- 

Third class. — Cicero: Horaep •pnmn. in 
r, , , «. ' x:iurace > Composition. 

feecond claas.-Horace; Selections from Latin P.m 
writers. Classical Literature. ' tS and Prose 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

MECHANIC ARTS. 



39 



G. H. Bryant B. S . Instructor 

This department of Manual Training will embrace when com 
pleted a three year's course as follows : IsTy ear, wood - working, 
carpentry, turning and pattern making; 2nd. year, forge and foun- 
dry work, — moulding, casting, a id smithing; 3rd. year, ma- 
chine shop, — chipping and filing, and machine work in metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the three lower 
classes (5th, 4th, and 3rd.) For satisfactory reasons a student may 
be excused from this laboratory work by ihe Faculty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, iu thiee exer- 
cises, of two hours each. 

The wood- working shop was established in 18*5, with a complete 
equipment for wood-work. A thorough course is now provided for. 

During the past year the forge shop and foundry have been built 
and equipped, and are now in successful operation. 

It is expected the authorities will complete the other department 
% of machinery etc., the next session, with the funds recently appro- 
priated by tne Legislature. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is de- 
rived from a twenty five horse-power Harris-Corliss automatic en- 
gine, which is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel 
horizontal tubular boiler of most approved design. A Deane steam 
pump, and a heater for the feed water form a part of the steam 

apparatus. 

The equipment for the wood working shop comprises the follow- 
ing : 20 double wood working • benches, each wiih complete set of 
carpenter's tools; 16 turning lathes, 10 in. swing, each with com- 
plete set of tools ; 1 double circular saw; 1 band saw; 1 board 
planing machine; 1 buzz planer; 2 scroll saws (power); 1 large 
pattern maker's lathe, 16 in. swing; I 36 in. grindstone. In addi- 
tion to these,the tool worn is supplied with a variety of extra hand 

tools for special work. 

During the summer of 1886 a substantial brick building 72 by 
32 feet, one story high, with monitor roof, was built for the forge 
and foundry departments. This is divided into two rooms each 
35 by 30 feet, each department occupying one room. 

The equipment for the Foundry consists of moulding benches 
for 12 students, each supplied with a complete set of moulder's 



gM-f 



r~-% »• 



40 



AGRKTLTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



r 



tools; a 14 inch cupola with all modern improvements, capable of 
melting lOOO "pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace in which 
can be niched 100 pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of cru^i - 
bles tongs, etc. Also a full supply of ladles, large and small 
moulding flasks, special tools, etc. 

The Forge Shop equipment consists of 12 hand forges of new 
pattern each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast 
for all the forges is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure 
blower (which also furnishes blast for the foundry cupola); and a 
No. 15 Sturtevant exhaust blower draws the smoke from the fires 
into the smoke flues and forces it out through the chimijey. 

The nature of the work in each department is as follows: 

1st, year: I — ,A course of Carpentry (hand work covering the 
first term and part of the second or about five months.) 

The lessons include instruction on the nature and use of tools, 
instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary work with 
plare, saw, chisel, etc, different kinds of joints — tiiiiher-splices, 
cross joints, mortice and tennon, miter and frame work, dovetail 
work comprising different kinds of joints used in cabinet making, 
light cabinet work, examples in building, framing, roof-trusses, 
etc. 

II — .A course in turning and pattern making extends through 
the three months of the third term. .The lessons comprise first 
nature and use of lathe and tools, plain straight turning, caliper 
work to different diameters and lengths, simple and compound 
curves, screw plates and chuck work, hollow and spherical turn- 
ing. The work in pattern making comprises a variety of examples 
of whole and split patterns, core work, etc. giving the student prac- 
tice in fbrming irregular shapes in wood with the lathe and carv- 
ing tools, as well as familiarity with the nature and use of patterns 
for moulding, 

2nd. year : I— .A course in moulding and casting in iron and 
brass, occupying the first ten weeks. The work cousists for the 
most part of small articles such as light machine parts, but a suffi- 
cient variety of forms are introduced for the student to acquire a 
good general and practical knowledge of the usual methods and 
appliances used in light foundry work. Most of the work is in 
green sand in two-part flasks, core work is also given, and some 
three-part flask and some dry sand work is introduced. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



41 



The s?;me patterns which have been made by students the 
previous year are used, besides special patterns for occasional 
larger <r more ^complicated work. Instruction and practice is 
given in working the cupJla, each student iu turn taking charge 
of a melting. 

II A course in forge work in iron and steel. The lessons are 
arranged so that the students in making the series of objects, be- 
come familiar with the nature of the metals, and the successive 
steps in working tnem by hand into simple and complex forms; as 
drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, welding by va- 
rious methods, tool forging, tempering, hardening, etc. \ 

In connection with this second-year work, a series of lectures is 
given on the metallurgy and working of the metals used in the 
industrial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, etc. 

All instruction is given; first, by black-board drawings or sketch- 
es which the student copies, with dimensions, in note book, 
wiU which each one provides himself; thus each one works from 
his own notes. This is supplemented, whenever necessary, by the 
actual construction of the lesson by the instructor before the cWs: 
second, by inspection and direction at the bench by the instructor. 

3d, year: Course in Machinery. Students desiring to 
pursue the study of applied mechanics beyond the above course 
in shop work, will be required *o take in addition a special 
course including the study of Steam and Mill Engineering, 
supplemented by experiment and practice with the apparatus ; 
including steam generation and the forms, construction and use of 
steam boilers and accompanying apparatus ; steam as a motive 
power, and forms, construction and use of the steam engine, with 
the study and use of the indicator ; transmission of power,— shaft- 
ing, belting, gearing, etc., also elementary theoretical mechan- 
ism. 



MODERN LANGUAGES AND HISTORY. 

W. 8. Fleming, Adjunct Professor. 

No attempt is made in this department to teach a student to 
speak French and German. The aim is to give such a facility in 



^™ 




42 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



reading these two languages as will afford ready access to the im- 
portant scientific papers in foreign journals. The following 
courses are pursued: 

French, — I. Otto's Grammar, part first; exercises in writing 
French; French readings. 

French, — II. Otto's Grammar, part second; French composi- 
tions, Racine's Athalie. 

French, — III. Compositions, scientific French. 

German — I. Otto's Grammar, part first; exercises in writing 
German; German reading. 

German— II. Otto's Grammar, part second, Schiller's Wil- 
helm Tell, Scientific German and composition. 

The students of the lower classes only have regular recitations 
in history. 

MILITARY SCJENCE AND TACTICS 

Lieut. Richards U.S. Army, Commandant. 

Military Science and Tactics are required to be taught in ihi's In- 
stitution by law. This law is faithfully carried out , by imparting to 
each student, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, practical in- 
struction in the School of the Soldier, of the Company and of the 
Battalion, also in Guard Mountings, Inspections, Dress Parades, 
Reviews, etc. 

Under Section 1225 U. S. Revised Statutes, the College is pro- 
vided with modern Cadet Rifles and accoutrements and two pieces 
of Field Artillery. Ammunition for practice firing is used under 
the direction of an experienced officer. 

The following uniform of standard cadet gray cloth has been 
prescribed for dress, viz: Coats and pants as worn at West Point 

with sack-coat for fatigue, dark- blue cadet cap, white helmet for 
dress occasions. 

A very neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained here at 
$18. This is less expensive than the usual clothing. All students 
are required to wear this uniform during the session. 

The drills are short, and the military duty involves no hard- 
ships. The military drill is a health giving exercise, and its good 
effects in the development of the physique and improvement of the 
carriage of the cadet are manifest. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. The offi- 



<* 



■% 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 43 

% 

cers are selected fjr proficiency in drill, deportment and stud- 
ies. Each company is officered by one Captain, one 1st. Lieuten- 
ant, one 2nd. Lieutenant and with a proper number of sergeants 
and Corporals. The officers and non-commissioned officers are dis- 
tinguished by appropriate insignia of raik. These appointments 
are conferred by the President, on nomination of the Command- 
ant. 
Privates of the First Class may be excused by the faculty from 

all military drill except battalion drill. 

The First and Second Classes recite once a week in Military Tac- 
tics. 



POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 

There are three Post-Graduate Degrees-MASTER OF SCIENCE, MINING ENGINEEB 
and CIVIL ENGINEER. 

A Post-Graduate Degree may be obtained by a graduate of this 
College, or of any other institution of equal grade, by one years 
residence at the College, spent in the successful prosecution of a 
course of study in applied science prescribed by the faculty. 

Candidates must also present to the faculty a satisfactory thesis 
showing independent investigation upon some subject pertaining 

to their course of study. 

Applicants for Post-Graduate Degree are by order of the Board 
permitted to matriculate without payment of fees, except labor- 
atory fees for those who work in the chemical laboratory. 

They are subject to the general regulations as other students, 
but are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident Graduates, who are not candidates for a degree 
are permitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in any de- 
partment of the college, except chemical laboratory, without pay- 
ment of regular fees. 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions will be awarded in the different subjects of each class 
to those students whose grade is above 90 per cent, and who have 
satisfactorily passed all the regular examinations of that session. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on Commence 
ment day to those who obtain three Distinctions, 



•\ 



>v 






"K 



4-! 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are kept by the 

officers of instruction, in a form adapted to permanent preservatKL. 

From the record a monthly circular, or statement is sent to the 

parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written recitations, or monthly examinations on the studies of the 
month are held at the option of the professor. 

At the end of each term writte^Nor oral examinations, or both, 
are held on the studies passed over during that term. v 

Special examinations are held ou^y by order of tha Faculty, and 
in no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examina- 
tion can be promoted to full standing to the next higher class only 
on satisfactory sxaminatione at the opening of the next session. 

It i « required that every student who enters the college shall remain 
through the examinations at the end of the term. Leaves of absenc'e 
and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted within six 
weeks of the examinations, except in extreme cases. 

Examinations for degrees or certificates of proficiency embrace 
the entire subject of study in the course. 

MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. 

Many valuable additions have been made to the various branch- 
es of this Museum within the past few years. 

Contributions have been received from different States of the 
Union, and from foreign countries. > 

The Geology of Alabama is well illustrated with minerals, fossil- 
iferous and non-fossiliferous rocks from the different formations of 
the State. The Museum is divided Into the department of miner- 
alogy, conchology, geology, zoology and botany. Each depart- 
ment is systematically arranged and catalogued for study and 
inspection. 

The following finely articulated-skeletons of mammals prepared by Prof Ward 

tSSS! n placed in the museum for ™«^^™ 

Man(Wmana); orang-outan (simia satyrus); spider monkey; 
cat(/dw d^u»y, , log (ca»U famUiari*); mink (putorius 
™o,0; sloth bear (ursus labiatus); California sea-lion (zalophus 
vUetpn); bottle nose dolphin (delphinustursio); horse (equvs ca- 
ba/lus); hog (.us scropha); sheep (a* aries); ox (bos dvrnesticus); 



$ 



i 



1 1 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



45 



* 



Canada porcupine ierethizon dormtum\ two toed sloth (chcelepus 
'Hda-ctylvs) ; great-ant-eater (myrmeeophaga jvbata) ; giant kan- 
garoo (waeropnx gigas.) and others. 

The entire collection of the Museum, added to the private cabi- 
net belonging to theProfessor of Natural History, numbers more 
than 30.000 specimens. 

MUSEUM OF AGRICULTURE. 

The Agricultural Museum is intended to illustrate, as far as pos- 
sible, the agricultural products of this and other countries. It 
now contains specimens, obtained by donatio^ and by 
a system of exchanges with other Agricultural Colleges, illustrating 
varieties of soils, cotton, wheat, oats, corn, peas, grasses etc. 

LIBRARY. 

A room iu the college building is appropriated to the Library, 
but the number of books at present is not large. 

The Library is open at stated times, when students are permitted 
to select books according to regulations prescribed by the fac- 
ulty, 

PRINTING OFFICE. 

The Printing Office i« under the charge of Professor Mell, wh 
assisted by D.M. Thrash as foreman, superintends the woik of the 
class in printing at fixed hours during the week. The office occu- 
pies a large room in the college building and has a complete outfit 
consisting of an excellent Gordon press, with fonts of type and 
stands for twelve students. It is open each afternoon for practice 
by the cadets. This Department is also furnished with a Caligraph 
Type-writer where special students have the opportunity of be- 
coming familiar with type writing. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the President 
and Faculty in accordance with the code ot laws and regulations 

enacted by the trustees. # # 

Attention to study, and punctuality in attendance on recitations 
and all other duties, is required of every student. 



mmmmmmmm 



46 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

Students are not allowed to have in their possession weapous or 
arms not issued for the performance of militaty duty. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and also at- 
tend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. * i 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes every 
Sunday. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized, and through its weekly 
meetings exerts a wholesome christian influence among the stu- 
dent of the College. 

The following students are the officers of the Association: 

Fontaine Broun, President. G. H. Lamar, Vice Presdt. 

Robertson Riggs, Secretary. Frank Philips, Cor. Sec. 

Hugh Taylor, Treasurer. 

LOCATION. 

« 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, sixty miles east 
of Montgomery, directly on the line of the Western Rail-road. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general good 
health and entire freedom from malari^ having an elevation of 
eight hundred aud twenty one feePabove tide'-water. By statute 
of the State, the sale of spirituous liquors and keeping saloons 
of any kind are forbidden. 

THESIS. 
Eaeh applicant for a regular degree is required to write and sub- 

SL ., * ?l? * S ° n " 8UbjeCt ° f immediate relation t0 
5«qS b°y f tZSf* dCliVer ^ ^ at — . 

«^^«s* ta given t0 the profe880r of English by the 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

neSTwS T ST 7 S °? tie8 ' the WiFt and Websterian, con- 
ZS fi L °°y- EaCh haS a <«*<>«* hall, Land- 
somelv fctted up, a library of standard and miseellaneou works 



Ik 



* 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 47 

and a reading room. Their weekly exercises add to the facilities 
afforded by the College for practice in composition, elocution and 

discussion. 

These Societies hold celebrations on the evenings of Thanksgiv- 
ing Day and the 22d of February, and also on Tuesday evening of 
Commercement week. They elect annually, with the approval of 
the Faculty, an orator to represent them at the close of the year. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the Society, is de- 
livered in the chapel, during Commencement week. The follow- 
ing are officers of tne Society : E R. Rivers, President ; T. J. 
Lamar, Vice Pres't; C C. Thach, Sec. and Treas. ; C. H. Lind- 
sey, Orator. 

BOARDING. 

The college has no barracks or dormitories, and the students 
board with the families of the town of Auburn, and thus enjoy all 
the protecting and beneficial infiu e.xes of the family circle. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it is to re- 
port those who, without permission, leave their rooms after the 
''call to quarters," or are guilty of any violation of order, 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, ™££^ 
to make changes without obtaining permission from the President. 

EXPENSES. 

Incidental fee, per half session ^ 

Library fee per half session - ^ 

Surgeon's fee per half ses sion $If tolOO 

Board, per month, ^taM ^^"^1. on Feb- 

These fees are payable, 111. on maim. remitted 

ruary 1st. By order of the Board, no fees can be remitted. 

There is no charge ****** . the cadets reported sick, 

Gh T th&nthe Z l Z!lTlTu S been reduced by a few 
aa ry 1st., the fees for half session only are required. 



211849 



46 



AGRICULTURA, AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



N 



FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians arc advi>ed to deposit with the treas- 
urer of the college all funds desired for sons 01 wards, whether 
for regular charges of College tl^ and hoard, or for any other 
purpose. It is the duty of this officer to keep safely all funds 
placed in his hands, and to pay all expenses incurred by the 
students, including board, uniform, books, etc., only when ap- 
proved by the President. 

When funds are deposited, cheeks are drawn on the treasurer 
of the college by the cadet to defray his necessary expenses. These 
checks are paid only when approved by the President. The Pres- 
ident will only approve for necessary expenses as stated in the car 
alogue, unless specially requested in writing by the parent. 
. To cover the expenses of fees, books, uniform and board for one. 
month, not less than $50 should be deposited with the treauuvr 
on matriculation. 

The attention of parents is called to the following law enacted 
by the trustees : 

When n student matriculates, all money required to pay the college fees, and al* 
other moneys in his possession, must be deposited with the Treasurer, unless the Pres- 
ident shall receive special instruction from the parent or guardian to the contrary. 

• 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

The Academic Year commences on the fifteenth of Sep- 
tember, and ends on the second Wednesday in June follow- 
ing, which is Commencement day, 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends from 
the opening of the session to the last week in December: the sec- 
ond term begins January 1st and ends May 31st: the third term 
continues from April 1st to the close of the session. 



RESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 

27 Th i e 8^ ll0Wi ^ reS ° 1Uti0n Was a(l0pted b * the ***** ** their meeting held August 

'•That in view of increased facilities for instruction in Agriculture, and the technical 

SS^IK^ 2S TT* 1 by thiS °° 11 *** ***«W to *■ department 
of Mechanic Arts, made possible by the recent donation from the S:ate the faculty are 

authorized, in addition to the legal name of this college, to print ^^S^T£ 

words ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, as significant of SmfiSS 

of practical instruction in industrial science in the course of tiimJS^^^S 



Qaylord 

PAMPHLET UNDER 

Syracuse, N. Y. 
Stockton, Calif. 



I 




r 



Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



1887 



► 


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Rec statt 


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19970429 


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ISSN: 


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b *e f *f u *g 


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Dates: 1873, 


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OCLC: 36819601 
Entered: 19970429 

ELvl: 

Form: 

Orig: 

SrTp: 

AAA *c 

h *b c 

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LD271 *b .A76 I 

*b I 

AAAA 1 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama, f 

Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama *h [microform] 1 

► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 10 24610 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Auburn, Alabama f 

► 11 246 10 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama 1 

► 12 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama I 

Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, I 
21 v. ; *c 21 cm. I 
Annual I 

1872-73-1892-93. I 
Title varies slightly. 1 

Microfilm. *m 1873-1893. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
*d 1997. *c microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. I 

► 19 539 d *b 1873 *c 1893 *d alu *e u *f u *g a 1 

► 20 650 Universities and colleges =*=z Alabama *x Periodicals. 1 

► 21 61020 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 
Periodicals. I 

► 22 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. ±t Catalogue and 
circular of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama I 

► 23 78500 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. ±t Catalogue of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute f 

► 24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project I 



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ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 
CATALOGUE 
1887-88 



AUBURN UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY 









„ 






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*A*N 'asnDDjAs 

•3U| -soyg aacn 



~* i^i ** *~* * r^w 1 ^* 



CAT.2- 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 




to Hpiiltural and Jfchaoical College. 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 






1887-'88. 



AUBURN, ALABAMA. 



— ■ 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



His Excellency THOMAS SEAY, President ex-officio 

Hon. SOLOMON PALMER, Superintendent of Education, ex-officio 

Hon. JONATHAN HARALSON (term expires 1889.). ..- Selma 

Hon. R. F. LIGON (term expires 1889.) Tuskegee 

Hon. JOHN W. BISHOP ....... .(term expires 1889.) Talladega 

Hon. J. G. GILCHRIST (term expires 1 891.). A. Montgomery 

Hon. M. L. STANSEL (term expires 1891.)../. . ..Carrollton 

Hon. J. N. MALONE (term expires 1891.U.. Athens 

Hon. C. C. LANGDON (term expires I893.) Mobile 

Hon. R. F. KOLB (term expires 1893.).. Eufaula 

Hon. J. B. MITCHELL. (term expires 1893.) Seale 



E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. 

F. M. REESE, Secretary and Auditor. 



consTrucuIn! ^"^ BUUdin * repreSented in ^engraving is now in process of 






rtO 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



t • > 

WM. I.eROY BROUN, M. A., LL.D., 
BARKSDALE President, and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, Jr., M. E., Ph. D., 
Professor of Natural History and Geology. 

JAMES H. LANE, C. E., A. ]VJ., 
Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing, 

s 

J. S. NEWMAN, 
Professor of Agriculture and Director of the Experiment Station. 

CHARLES C THACH, B. E., 

Professor of English and Latin. • 

N. T. LUPTON, A. M., M. D., LL. D„ 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

LIEUT. M. C RICHARDS, 2d Artillery, U. S. A. [West Point], 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 

GEORGE H. BRYANT, M. E. [Mass. Inst. Technology], 

Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

GEORGE PETRIE, M. A. [Univ. Va.], 
Adjunct Professor of Modern Languages and History. 

L. W. WILKINSON, B. Sc. 
B. S. BURTON, B. Sc. 
Assistants in the Chemical Laboratory \ 

C. H. ROSS, B. Sc s 
V. L. ALLEN, B. Sc, 
Assistants in Mathematics and English, 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D., 
Surgeon. 

C. C. THACH, 
Librarian and Recording Secretary. 

O. D. SMITH, 
Corresponding Secretary \ 



-Z01813 



A 



OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 



The leading object of the College, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, is to 
teach the principles and the applications of science. 

In its courses of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially those that relate 
to agriculture and the mechanic arts, so far as the facilities 
at its disposal will permit ; and at the same time the dis- 
cipline obtained by the study of languages and other sciences 
is not neglected. 

All students are required to study the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to students in any 
course. 

The special or technical instruction given is thus based 
'on a sound general education. 

The College in fact has become a distinctive school of indus- 
trial science — or Polytechnic Institute — a title which by 
resolution of the trustees is permitted to be inscribed on 
the catalogue, and work of great value to the youth of the 
State is now being accomplished by fitting them, by a thor- 
ough science-discipline, in which handcraft in the lower 
classes is made a prominent feature, for the successful and 
honorable performance of the responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline of 
the students in endeavoring to train them to habits of accu- 
rate scientific thought and thus qualify them for the duties 
of life, whatever their vocation may be, their moral and 
Christian training will always constitute the prominent care 
and thought of the Faculty. 



6 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR 

INSTRUCTION. 

The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory 
instruction in applied science in the following departments : 

I — IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 210 acres and is supplied with illustra- 
tive specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultual experiment station, established in connec- 
tion with the College, where experiments and scientific invest- 
igations relating to agriculture are daily made, affords unu- 
sual opportunities to students to become familiar with agri- 
culture, its defects and remedies. • 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where lectures 
are delivered in presence of the object discussed, and during 
the year exercises in practical agriculture and horticulture 
of an educational character are given the students who enter 
upon this course of study. 

II — IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The Laboratory of Mechanic Arts is used as an auxiliary 
in industrial education, as a school of manual training in 
the arts that constitute the foundation of various industrial 
pursuits. The work performed by the students is instructive 
in character, as in any other laboratory, and the classes are 
taught in sections by a series of graded lessons under the 
supervision of the professor. In the lower classes of the 
College each student enters this school, and is assigned three 
exercises a week, each, exercise being two hours long. 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade but 
to educate, to discipline and train the eye and the hand a» 
well as the mind, and thrs, by associating manual and men- 
tal training, to thoroughly educate the student for the 
duties of life, whatever his vocation may be There is no 
attempt to teach students special skill in constructing arti- 
cles of commercial value, but all the exercises are systemat- 
ically arranged and designed for purposes of education 



f 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



The wood department is located in a commodious hall 
90x50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse power 
Corliss engine, with indicator, a planer, circular saw, band- 
saw, two scrolll saws, a buzz planer, twenty stands with 
lathes, with full sets of lathe and carpentry tools required 
for instruction. 

A brick building with two rooms, each 30x35 feet, has 
recently been constructed especially for instruction in work- 
ing iron. 

One room is equipped with twelve forges and tools required 
for a forge department, the other with a cupola furnace, hav- 
ing a capacity of 400 pounds, a core oven, moulding benches 
and special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a Sturt- 
evant fan and exhauster supplied with power from the en- 
gine. % ■ *• 

The machine department is equipped with eight engine 
lathes — one speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one post drill, 
one shaper, one five-foot planer, one universal milling ma- 
chine, a corundum tool-grinder and small emery grinder. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches and vises for twelve students. 

The Weston dynamo of five horse power, used at present 
for lighting the halls, is located in the large hall of the Me- 
chanic Art Laboratory. 

It is designed, when the buildings now under construction 
are completed, to supply the different laboratories with elec- 
tricity by this dynamo. 

Ill — IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The new chemical laboratory will be supplied with new 
and modern apparatus, and in its entire equipment will 
afford excellent facilities for instruction in practical chem- 
istry. 

V p— «, 

The investigations that will be undertaken in this labora- 
tory by scientific experts, in connection with the work of 
the agricultural experiment station, will be of especial value 
to advanced students, and will afford them unusual oppor- 
tunities to learn the methods of scientific research. The 















8 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 



i 



building contains a large general laboratory that will ac- 
commodate sixty students, and lecture room, and nine other 
rooms, all appropriated to instruction and research in chem- 
istry. 

It will be equipped with the improved modern appliances 
necessary for instruction and investigation. 

IV — IN PHYSICS AND MINERALOGY. 

In the main College structure, now being rebuilt, provis- 
ion will be made for laboratory work in these and in other 
departments of science. Temporary rooms are now used, 
and apparatus is supplied as demanded by the work of the 
College. 

r . . V — IN BOTANY, ETC. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station, inves- 
tigations in botany and entomology will be given special 
attention, and unusual opportunities will be offered ad- 
vanced students for practical work in these departments in 
laboratories especially fitted with appliances for research. 

VI— IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work has been provided 
for the use of students, and the customary exercises in the 
field are given. 

VII— IN DRAWING. 

All the students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 
well as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observation 
and execution. 

VIII— IN MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity 
with the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of 
regular military drill, and in addition the military system 
is used as a means of enforcing discipline and securing good 
order, promptness and regularity in the performance of 
academic duties. 






This department is under the charge of Lieut. M. C. 
Richards, 2nd Artillery, U. S. A. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 9 

It has recently been supplied with new cadet muskets 
and accoutrements for the corps, and for artillery practice, 
with two three-inch rifle guns, carriages and limbers. 



COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 



The main College building was destroyed by fire on the 24th of June 
1887. The frontispiece is an engraving of the building, 160 by 71 feet 
now in process of construction. It will contain, exclusive of the base 
ment story, thirty-five rooms. This building will not be used for dor 
mitories for students, but will be appropriated for purposes of instruc 
tion. It will contain the lecture rooms and offices of the professors 
laboratories, library, museum, armory, etc. 




CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The new chemical laboratory is a handsome two-story structure, 40 
by 60 feet, with a rear projection 35 by 60 feet of one story and base- 
ment. The exterior is of pressed brick, with cut stone trimmings and 
terra-cotta ornamentation. 



IT 



10 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 




FIRST FLOOR. 

A, Spectroscope and polariscope room; B, Assistant's private working-room; 

C, Combustion-furnace room. 

On entering the first room to the left is the office of the professor to 
he rear of which is the library and balance-room. On the S el 
enchng the whole lengthof the floor, is the State laboratory - ndtbo'a' 
tory for research Two small rooms are cut off from this ot a 
balance-room, and the other for the spectroscope and polaris^e 



? 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



II 



Leading from the roar of the main hall is the door which enters the 
large laboratory for general work. Two rooms are cut off from this — 
one for combustion furnaces and the other a private working- room 
for the assistant. 



~* 



3 






E 


1 


3 
3 




*f* 






3 







c 




3 


l 




c 






SECOND FLOOR. 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and storage .. 
The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and, when the 
fitting up is completed, will contain the latest improved working-tables^ 
with water, gas and every necessary appliance for chemical work. 
Niches in the walls opposite each working-table, with hoods where 
necessary, connect with flues, and furnish the best possible means of 



*i 



™ 




12 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



escape lor deleterious vapors, while ventilators in the ceiling furnish 
additional means for getting rid of noxious gases. The pitch is sixteen 
feet in the clear, with paneled ceiling of oiled Southern pine. The 
rooms are wainscoted throughout and finished in natural wood. 

The second story contains a lecture-room and room for gas-analysis. 
Around this lecture-room will be cases for containing crude and man- 
ufactured products, illustrating the subjects of agricultural and indus- 
trial chemistry, which are prominent subjects taught in this institution. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building ninety by fifty feet. The second story is 
the audience hall, used for commencement and other public occasions. 

The first story is appropriatecj to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 
This building is at present temporarily used for recitation rooms, and 
will continue to be so used until the completion of the new College 
building. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 1 3 



GRADUATES. 

WITH DEGREE OP BACHELOR OP SCIENCE (B. Sc). 



Class of 1887. 

Arthur John Alexander, Thomas Hugh Jones, 

Vassar Lyle Allen, George Holt Lamar, 

Henry Clay Armstrong, Edward Read Lloyd, 

Burwell Lee Boykin, Wilson Herbert Newman, 

William Easly Davis, Frank Howard Perry, 

Roger ap Catesby Jones, Charles Woodard Simmons. 

WITH THE DEGREE OP MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

i 

Boiling Anthony Blakey, (A. 2?., Univ. Ah.) 
Charles Irwin Mell, (-4. J?., Univ. Ga.) 

WITH THE DEGREE OF CIVIL ENGINEER. 

James William Morgan, Jr., ((?r., St. N f p f l Col.) 



^ 



^ 



14 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 

Awarded Honor Certificates in 1887. 



The students of each class, who secure a grade above 90 
in three or more different subjects, are distinguished for 
excellence in scholarship, and are awarded honor certifi- 
•cates. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Vassar Lyle Allen, Edward Read Lloyd, 

Burwell Lee Boykin, Wilson Herbert Newman, 

•George Holt Lamar, Frank Howard Perry, 

Charles Woodard Simmons. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Fontaine Broun, Edmund Wiley Foster, 

George Fleming Broun, Edwin Conway McCartney, 

Alonzo Francis Cory, Thomas Drake Samford, 

John Hodges Drake, Jr., Otis Oliver Smith, 

William Kerr Terry. 

THIRD CLASS. 

Thomas John Brooks, Arthur St. Charles Dunstan, 

Charles Morris Cory, Pleasant Lee Hutchinson, 

Boiling HalLCrenshaw, John Reuben Irvin 

Howard Grayson Crowder, Oscar Don Killebrew 

Percival Lewis Dryer, Joseph Hugh Moragne, 

Walter Davis Dunlap, Hugh McGehee Taylor, 

Frederick Henry Vernon. 

FOURTH CLASSY 

S^ John Hammond Little, 

Frank Maury Fontame, Thomas Martin McMillan 

Wilhain Groce Harrison, F rank Davis Milstead ' 
Robert Edward Daniel Irvin, Herbert ?4neZtlon 
William Mernwether Leary, George Ho/ston WaS^. 



— . 



^ 



V- 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



FOR THE SESSION 1887-88. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



NAMES. 




•" 



Vassar Lyle Allen, B. Sc, . 
Thomas Hugh Jorjes, B. Sc, . 
Edward Read Lloyd, B. Sc, 
Wilson Herbert Newman, B. Sc, . 
Charles Hunter Ross, B. Sc, . 
Charles Woodard Simmons, B. Sc, 

FIRST CLASS. 

Cyrus Washington Ashcraft, 

Robert Love Bennett, . 

% George Fleming Broun, * / ^ 
^Fontaine Broun, 

Henry Lee Broun, 

Alonzo Francis Cory, 
vTohn Hodges Drake, Jr., . 

Edmund Wiley Foster, 

^ohn Thomas Gregory, .*T 
<Eugene Willis Harris, 

George Abner Huguley, . 

William Lyman, 

?$Mwin Conway Macartney, 

Thomas Drake Samford', . . 

Otis Oliver Smith, 

Samuel Oliver Taylor, . . . , 

SECOND CLASS. 

Burton Mell Bishop, . . 

Thomas Jefferson Brooks, 

Residence is Alabama when State is not named. 



RESIDENCES* 

Montgomery. At* 

Lee. 

Lee. ► h\m**+ 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Dale. 



Clay. 

Texas. 

Lee. 

West Virginia. 

Virginia. 

Autauga. 

Lee. 

Mobile. 

Lauderdale. 

Lee. 

Georgia. 

Shelby. 

Mobile. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Lee. 



Georgia. 
Georgia. 



i6 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



Leslie Dallas Burdett, . 
•Aaron Jason Burr, 
John Robert Clower, . 
Edmund Collins Cochran, . 
Abednego Jackson Crawford, 
Boiling Hall Crenshaw, . . 
Arthur Campbell Crowder, 
Howard Grayson Crowder, . 
Howard Staten Doster, . 
Percival Lewis Dryer, 
Walter Davis Dunlap, 
Arthur St. Charles Dunstan, 
George William Harris, . 
Pleasant Lee Hutchinson, 
Egbert Jones, 
Oscar Don Killebrew, 
Andrew Manly Lloyd, 
William Lane Martin, 
Arthur Wesley Oliver, 
Prank Philips, 
Thomas Alexander Ross, 
Lawrence Avery Smith, . 
Edgar Johnson Spratling, 
Hugh McGehee Taylor, . 
Daniel Mathew Thrash, 
Paul Turner Vaughan, . 
Frederick Henry Vernon, 
Thomas Morgan Watlington, 
Norman Rutherford Weaver, 



THIRD CLASS. 

Benjamin Cheny Abernethy, 
James William Bivins, 
Benjamin Wilbur Breedlove, . 
David Browder, 
Wilmer Calloway, 
Mosby Stuart Chandler, 
George Samuel Clarke, . 
Walter Girard Cook, 



Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Lee. 

Montgomery. 
Lee. 
Butler. 
St. Clair. 
St. Clair. 
Autauga. 
Macon. 
Dallas. 
Shelby. 
Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Dale. 
Lee. 

Jefferson. 
Bullock. 
Florida. 
Lee. 

Chambers. 
Chambers. 
Lee. 

Dallas. 

Dallas. 

Chambers. 

Marengo. 

Dallas. 



Florida. 

Georgia. 

Macon. 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

Bullock. 

Montgomery. 
Lowndes. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



17 



Houston Franklin Cooper, 

Charles White Davis, 

George Woodhull Emory, 

Stonewall Jackson Emory, . 

William Francis Feagan, 

Francis Maury Fontaine, 

Daniel Gillis, 

Charles Bowles Glenn, 

Clifford LeRoy Hare, 

John Dixon Harris, 

William Groce Harrison, 

Martin Horst, 

Robert Edward Daniel Irvin, 

Hunter Allen Lang, 

Felix Hope Leslie, 

Lionel Clarence Levy, 

John Hammond Little, . 

Louis Vaughn Massey, 

Frank Brooks Mathews, . 

Wilmot Bivins Mathews, 

Thomas Morton McMillan, 

Frank Davis Milstead, 

John Milton, Jr., 

Thomas James Molton, 

Robert Ernest Noble, 

Polk Keaton Pennington, 

Reuben Hayne Poole, 

Edward Clyde Powers, 

Edward Hill Pritchett, . 

William Sylvestei Prout, 

James Edward Ray, 

Seldon Jasper Riddle, 

Herbert Payne Robertson, 

Joseph Huguley Robinson, 

William Walter Robinson, 

Archibald Young Sharpe, 

George Hall Smith, 

Charles Cabaniss Tate, 

Percy Willett Terry, 
2 



• • 



Georgia. 
^Florida. 
Lee. 
Lee. 
Bullock. 
. Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Lee. 
Lee. 

Chambers. 
. Talladega. 
. Mobile. 
Lee. 

Jefferson. 
Russell. 
Georgia. 
Lee. 
. Macon. 
Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Monroe. 
Elmore. 
Florida. 
Elmore. 
Calhoun. 
Bullock. 
Georgia. 
Lee. 

Lowndes. 
Marengo. 
Marshall. 
Etowah. 
Lowndes. • 
Chambers. 
Tallapoosa. 
Marengo. 
Georgia. 
. Marengo. 
Jefferson. 



s 



18 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 



Dixon Hamilton Tharin, 
Thomas Chilton Thorington, 
>/ George Houston Waring, 
William Cameron Weisinger, 
James Pielden Wilkinson, 
Fern Manly Wood, . . 



Georgia. 

Montgomery. 

Georgia. 

Talladega. 

Dale. 

Barbour. 



Hunter Holcombe Armstrong, 
Lee Ashcraft, . . 

Lawrence Ernest Baker, 
Armineas Vambery Bennett, 
Harmon Benton, 
Frank Jarvis Bivins, 
Leroy Wiley Bowie, 
Eobert Inge Burke, 
Howard Evans Bush, . 
Reuben Carr, 
Amos Hill Cox, • 

James Albert Cox, 
James Nathaniel Dean, 
William Jefferson Dennis, 
Walter William Drane, 
Arthur Thomas Dudley, 
Edwin Walton Duke, . # 
Robert Edward Lee Edwards, 
Douglas Francis Gordon, 
Dorian Hall, . . 

Bryant Clower Harvey, 
Beverly Franklin Harwc o . 
Belus Ephraim Hudso<* 
Cadmus Hughes, 
Fletcher Moore Hurt 
Joel Fletcher Hurt, 
k John Allen Jones, 
Hendley Varner Kell, . 
Raphael Semmes Kell, 
Frank Murray Key, 
Thomas Dixon Lewis, 



FOURTH CLASS, SECTION A. 

Lee. 



Clay. 
Jefferson. 
Lee. 

Barbour. 
Georgia. 
Talladega. 
Montgomery. 
Jefferson. 
Lee. 
Lee. 
Lee. 

Montgomery. 
Montgomery. 
Lowndes. 
Georgia. 
Chilton. 
Mobile. 
Louisiana. 
Lowndes. 
Lee. 
Perry. 
Lee- 
Walker. 
Macon. 
Georgia. 
Lee. 

Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Butler. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



X 9 



js Frank Allemong Lupton, 
William Audley Marshall, . 
Julius Marx, . . . 

Isaac Isaiah Moses, 
s William Henry Oates, . 
Samuel Lawrence Reed, 
Charles Rhodes, . . 
Charles Byrum Robinson, ; 
Frank Ford Snedecor, . 
Joseph Hardie Spence, 
Robert Clanton Smith, . 
John McCullough Tharin, . 
Jordan Emmett Thomason, 
Joseph Leslie Tucker, . . 
Horace Turner, 
Daniel Van Antwerp, . . 
Garet Van Antwerp, Jr, 
Alva Miles Wade, ... 
Clanton Ware Williams, 
Joseph Archibald Williams, 



Lee. 

. Georgia. 
Perry. 
Georgia. 
Mobile. 
Limestone. 
Barbour. 
Lowndes. 
Jefferson. 
Talladega. 
Chambers, 
Georgia. 
Randolph. 
Shelby. 
Mobile. 
Mobile. 
Mobile. 
Morgan. 
Montgomery. 
Jefferson. 



FOURTH CLASS, SECTION B. 



— •* Jacob Thompson Bullen, . 
Porter Campbell Flanagan, 
Raleigh Frederick Hare, . 
Joseph Andrew Holifield, 
Jeremiah Jackson, . . . 
John Robert Larkin, . 
George Lathrop, . .. . 
Johnson Edward McCall, 
John William Robinson, , 
Walter Daniel Smith, 

— * Sheldon Lyne Toomer, 
David Lewis Whetstone, 
George DeKalb Winston, . 
George Alfonzo Wright, 



Montgomery. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Sumter. 

Georgia. 

Chambers. 

Lee. 

Mobile. 

Lee. 

Elmore. 

Lee. 

Lee. 



:1 



20 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE- 





SUMMARY. 


* 


Graduates, 


• • 


6 


First Class, 


• • 


. 16 


Second Class, 


. • 


. . 31 


Third Class, 


• t 


. 53 


Fourth Class, 


Section A, 


51 


Fourth Class, Section B, 


. 14 


Total 


• • 


. . 171 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT OF 

STUDY. 

• 

. 164 Agriculture, . . • . 99* 

74 Physics, ... 72 

. 33 Natural History* Geology,89 

28 Physiology, . . 19 

48 Engineering, . . .24 

11 Drawing, . . . 120 

15 Mechanic Arts, . . 101 

150 Military Tactics, . 158- 

. 81 



English, 
History, . 
French, 
German, . 
Latin, . 
Mental Science, 
Political Economy, 
Mathematics, . 
Chemistry, . 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



21 



Military Organization. 

1887-'88. 

President. 
Wm. LkROY BROUN. 

Commandant. 
MELZAR C. RICHARDS, Lieut. 2nd U. S. Artillery. 

Surgeon. 
J. H. DRAKE, M. D. 

Assistant to Commandant with rank of Major. 
V. L. ALLEN. 



H. L. BROUN, 



Cadet Captains. 
T. D. SAMFORD, 



G. A. HUGULEY. 



•Cadet \st Lieut, and Adjutant. 
J. H. DRAKE, Jr. 

Cadet 1st Lieutenants. 
E. C. MACARTNEY, 
G. F. BROUN, 
R. L. BENNETT, 
E. W. HARRIS, 
0. 0. SMITH, 
E. W. FOSTER. 

43adet Sergeant Major. 
P. T. VAUGHAN, Jr. 



B. H. CRENSHAW. 

Cadet Sergeants. 
H. CROWDER, 

F. H. VERNON, 
E. J. SPRATLING, 
P. L. HUTCHINSON, 
A.M.LLOYD, 

G. W. HARRIS. 
A. C. CROWDER, 
T.J. BROOKS, Jr., 
A. J. BURR, 

T. A.ROSS, 

©'. D. KILLEBREW, 

A.St.C DUNSTAU. 



Cadet 1st Lieut, and Quartermaster, 
FONTAINE BROUN. 

Cadet 2nd Lieutenants. 
J. T. GREGORY, 
WM. LYMAN, 
S. 0. TAYLOR, 
C. W. ASHCRAFT. 



Cadet Q, M. Sergeant. 
JNO. R. CLOWER. 



Cadet Color Sergeant. 
F. PHILIPS. 

Cadet 1st Sergeants. 
H. M. TAYLOR, 



T. M. WATLINGTON. 



Cadet Corporals. 
H. F. COOPER, 
F. D. MILSTEAD, 

B. 0. ABERNETHY, 
JOHN MILTON, Jr., 

F. M. FONTAINE, 
W. G. HARRISON, 
R. E. NOBLE, 

C. THORINGTON, 
E. H. PRITCHETT, 
W. CALLOWAY, 

G. H. WARING, Jr., 
L. C LEVY. 



\ 



Cadet Color Corporals. 
G. W. EMORY, 
WM. F. FEAGIN, 
F. H. LESLIE, 
D. GILLIS,Jr., 
J. W. BIVINS, 
J. F. WILKINSON, 
W. C. WEISINGER. 



< 



22 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission must be of good moral charac- 
ter. To enter the fourth class the applicant must be not 
less than fifteen years of age, and be qualified to pass a sat- 
isfactory examination in the following subjects : 

1. Geography and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) An examination upon sentences con- 
taining incorrect English, (b) A composition giving evi- 
dence of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, 
grammar and division into paragraphs. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, including fundamental 
operations; common and decimal fractions; denominate 
numbers, the metric system ; percentage, including interest 
and discount ; proportion ; extraction of square and cube 
roots; (b) Algebra, to quadratic equations. 

For admission to the fourth class in the General Course, 
a satisfactory examination will also be required in Latin 
grammar and Caesar (4 books.) 

For admission to the higher classes, students should be 
prepared to stand a satisfactory examination on all the 
studies of the lower classes as shown in the courses of study. 
Where opportunity has not been offered to pursue special 
studies required at this College, the system of equivalents 
will be adopted, and studies which denote an equivalent 
amount of discipline and training will be accepted as satis- 
factory. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on the 15th of Sep- 
tember, the day on which the session opens. 

Applicants who are not fully prepared to stand the entrance 
examinations for full admission to the fourth class, includ- 
ing those of fourteen years of age, are admitted to the sub- 
college department, which includes the fourth class, Sec. B. 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report imme- 
diately to the President. No student will be admitted to a 
recitation in any class previous to matriculation. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 23 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen 
recitations per week, or their equivalent, in addition to 
the exercises in laboratory work, drawing and military 
drill. These additional exercises occupy not less than 
twelve hours per week. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS, 

Students who are qualified to prosecute the studies of the 
second class, and those over twenty-one years of age who 
are not candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, with 
the advice of the Faculty, the subjects of study they may 
prefer and for which they may be qualified ; all other stu- 
dents will be assigned to one of the regular prescribed 
courses of study, unless otherwise ordered by the Faculty, 
Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final exam- 
inations in any one study become special students. 

They will be classed as regular students pursuing a course 
for a degree whenever they can pass the examinations in 
those subjects in which they were found deficient. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and 
Natural Sciences with their applications; Agriculture, Me- 
chanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Engineering, Drawing, 
English, French, German and Latin Languages, History, 
Political Economy, Mental and Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to offer 
a liberal and practical education as a preparation for the 
active pursuits of life. 

There are three Degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and 
requiring four years for its completion : 

I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 

II. Course in Mechanics and Engineering. 

III. General Course. 



24 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

There are also two partial courses, each requiring two years 
for its completion : 

IV. Two Years' Course in Agriculture. 

V. Two Years' Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I. includes theoretical and practical instruction in 
those branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and 
is especially adapted to those who propose to devote them- 
selves to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II. includes the principles and applications of the 
sciences that directly relate to civil and mechanical engineer- 
ing, and is adapted to those who expect to enter the profes- 
sion of engineering. 

Course III. has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language to 
meet the wants of those students who have selected no defi- 
nite vocation in life, as well as of those who propose ulti- 
mately to engage in teaching, or in some commercial or 
manufacturing business. 

Courses IV. and V. have been arranged for the benefit of 
those students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, are 
unable to continue at college four years and take one of the 
regular degree courses. 

Students who complete either of these two year courses 
will, on passing a satisfactory examination, receive certifi- 
cates indicating their attainments. 

Students who have completed the general course in each 
department of the school of Mechanic Arts, and are qualified, 

can enter upon a more extended technical course in Mechani- 
cal Engineering. 

PREPARATORY COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

Students who expect to become practical pharmacists can 
enter upon a special course of Chemistry and Natural History 
and occupy all of their time in the laboratories of these 
departments under the immediate direction of the professors 
With the excellent facilities offered in the new" chemical 
laboratory, scientific preparation of greM value to the practi- 
t cal pharmacist can be obtained. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



25 



COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

* Students who have received the degree of B. Sc. in En- 
gineering, or who have prosecuted an equivalent course of 
study, can enter upon a special course of Mining Engineer- 
ing, which includes the following subjects of study, and will 
require a residence of one year : 

Industrial Chemistry — Assaying, Reduction of Ores, Min- 
eralogy, Economic Geology, Mining Machinery, Drifting, 
Tunneling, Timbering, Ore Dressing, and the various opera- 
tions connected with the exploitation of mines. 

This course of study will be under the charge of the Pro- 
fessors of Chemistry, Engineering and Natural History. 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature in 
the courses of education provided for the students of this 
College, and as far as possible all students are required to 
enter upon laboratory work in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction is given in the following depart- 
ments : 

I — Phemistry. 

II— Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, Etc, 
III — Agriculture. 
IV — Natural History. 
V — Technical Drawing. 
VI — Mechanic Arts. 



V 



26 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



L— COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 



FOURTH CLASS. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Latyy. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 



Third Term. 



5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 6. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physiology2. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'ry. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 



THIRD CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing,. 

4. Mech. Art Lab'ry. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 

SECOND CLASS. 



Third Term. 

2. English. 

3. Botany, (a). 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mech. Art Lab'ry. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 



3. English. 3. 

3. Physics. 3. 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. 
2. Agriculture. 2. 

4. Natural History (lab'y). 4. 

1. Military Tactics. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 

3. Military Drill. 3. 

(a) Begins March 1st. 



Second Term. 

English. 3. 

Physics. 3. 

Industrial Chemistry. 3. 
Agriculture. 2. 

Natural HistoryOab'yM. 
Military Tactics. 1. 

Chemical Laboratory. 9. 
Practical Agriculture. 2. 
Military Drill. 3. 



Third Term. 

English. 

Physics. 

Industrial Chemistry. 

Agriculture. 

Natural History (lab'y). 

Military Tactics. 

Chemical Laboratory. 

Practical Agriculture. 

Military Drill. 



r 





/ 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



2 T 



FIRST CLA8S. 



First Term. 

2. English Literature. 2. 

2. Mental Science. 2. 

2. Physics. 2. 

4. Natural History. 4. 

2. Agriculture. 2. 
2. Agricultural Chemistry2. 

1. Military Science. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 



Second Term, 

Political Economy. 2. 
Moral Science. 2. 

Astronomy. 2. 

Natural History. 4. 

Agriculture. 2. 

Agricultural Chemistry2. 
Military Science. 1. 

Chemical Laboratory. 9. 
Practical Agriculture. 2. 



Third Term. 

Political Economy. 
Moral Science. 
Astronomy. 
Natural History. 
Agriculture. 
Agricultural Chemistry- 
Military Science. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Practical Agriculture.. 



II.— COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FOURTH CLASS. 



First Term, 



Second Term. 



Third Term. 



5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. El. Physiology. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



5. English. 
2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture (a). 

3. Drawing. 



THIRD CLASS. 



Second Term. 



Third Term. 

2. English. 

3. Botany. 
5. Mathematics. 



3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture (a). 3. Agriculture (a). 

3. Drawing. 



3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y: 
3. Military Drill; 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



fa) For Agriculture may be substituted French or work in the Chemical Laboratory. 
(b) For Eng. Lit. and Pol. Econ., may be substituted French or German. 




— _^^_ 



28 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



SECOND CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English or French. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 

4. Lab'y, Mineralogy. 

4. Field Work, Engin'g. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 

3. English or French. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 

4. Lab'y, Mineralogy. 
4. Field Work, Engin'g. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English or French. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Field Work. E ngin'g. 
3. Military Drill. 



FIRST CLASS. 



First Term. 



Second Term. 



Third Term. 



2. English Literature (b). 2. Political Economy (b). 2. Political Economy (b). 



2. Physics. 

2. Natural History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 
Field Work, Engin'g. 



2. Astronomy. 2. 

2. Natural History. 2. 

3. Mathematics. 3. 
5. Engineering. 5. 
5. Drawing. 5. 
1. Military Science. 1. 

Field Work, Engin'g. 



Astronomy. 
Natural History. 

Mathematics. 
Engineering. 
Drawing. 
Military Science. 
Field Work, Engin'g. 



III.— GENERAL COURSE. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 



FOURTH CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 



Third Term, 

3. English. 
2. History. 

4. Latin. 

6. Mathematics. 
2. Agriculture. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Arts 
3. Military Drill. 3 Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. " 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



2 9 



THIRD CLASS. 



First Term, 

5. Latin. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 



Second Term. 

m 

5. Latin. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



3. Military Drill. 



3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. Botany. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



SECOND CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. Latin. 

2. Natural History. 
1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (a). 

3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. Latin. 

2. Natural History. 
1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (a), 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. French. 
3. Latin. 
2. Mathematics. 

2. Natural History. 
1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (a) . 

3. Military Drill. 



FIRST CLASS. 



First Term. 

2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 
5. German. 

1. Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



Second Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Moral Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 
5. German. 

1. Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



Third Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Moral Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 
5. German. 

1. Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



( 



a) The student may elect the Laboratory of Chemistry, Natural History or Mechanic Arts 



■i 



3° 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



IV.— TWO YEARS' COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS: 



? 






First Term. 

$. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
-3. Drawing. 

3. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
•3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5, Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 



3. Elementary Physiology2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

d. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



8. Drawing. 
12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 8. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

V.-TWO YEARS' COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 

•5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

•3. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
5. Agriculture. 
12. Practical Agriculture. 
3. Military Drill. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 
5. English. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 6. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physiology2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture. 

SECOND YEAR 

Second Term. 
3. English. 



5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

5. Agriculture. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
0. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
5. Agriculture. 



t M^ tlCal ^ cultare - 12 - Poetical Agriculture. 
i. Military DnlL 3. Military Drill. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

PRESIDENT BROUN. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text-books 
and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The first part of 
the course is occupied with Elementary Rational Mechanics 
treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of Molecular Me- 
chanics ; while due prominence is given to principles, frequent 
reference is made to the applications of science. 

The studies of the second class include the properties of 
matter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kinematics, 
kinetics, mechanic powers, friction, pendulum, molecular 
forces of solids, liquids and gases, theory of undulations, 
heat, electricity, magnetism, etc. 

The studies of the first class include Electricity and its 
applications ; Optics, Astronomy and Meteorology. 

Text-Books.— In Physics, Atkinson's Ganot. In Astronomy, New- 
comb & White. 

MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. SMITH. 

The general course for the first two years embraces the first 
year, Algebra and Geometry, six books ; second year, Solid 
Geometry, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Surveying, 
Mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained : First, mental dis- 
cipline. Second, a thorough knowledge of the principles of 
pure mathematics and their practical applications. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given in the third 
class in farm, town and government land surveying, divid- 
ing land, mapping, plotting and computing of areas, etc.; 
also in the theory,, adjustment and use of instruments. 



32 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to field 
practice. 

Mensuration includes an extended course in measure- 
ments of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and curvi- 
linear figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, 
lays the foundation for the pure and applied Mathematics of 
the Mechanical and Engineering course. Analytical Geom- 
etry, Descriptive Geometry and Calculus are pursued in the 
Engineering course. Especial attention is given to their 
practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is sup- 
plemented by lectures. Solutions of original practical prob- 
lems are required of the student to make him familiar with 
the application of principles and formulae. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Schuyler's Survey- 
ing, WentwortlVs Analytical Geometry, Waldo's Descriptive Geometry, 
Taylor's Calculus, Olney's and Wentworth's Trigonometry. 

NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. 

PROF. MELL. 

« 

Geology. — This subject is studied in the senior class. 

Special attention is given to the Geology of Alabama. 
The course is given by text-books and lectures. Attention 
is paid to the nature and origin of ore deposits, mineral 
springs and geological relations of soils. 

Zoology —k systematic arrangement of the Animal King- 
dom, in accordance with natural affinities, is made a special 
feature of the instruction. Particular attention is also given 
to insects injurious to vegetation, their habits, and the meth- 
ods best adapted for checking their ravages. 

Botany.— The students of the third class begin the study 
of Botany the 1st of March and continue it through the ses- 
sion/ Analytical work is made an important feature. This 
class is provided with plants from the neighboring fields, and 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 33 

taught how to determine their specific names. The work is 
sufficiently exhaustive to enable the student, after complet- 
ing the course, to name any of the ordinary weeds and grasses 
that he will encounter in this section. All students of 
the third class are required to study Botany. 

In the second class, in the course of Chemistry and Agri- 
culture, an amount of time is devoted to systematic and 
.structural Botany, and to advanced laboratory work with 
the microscope in the preparation of specimens showing 
plant structure ; this work is not only sufficient to famil- 
iarize the students with the methods of plant building and 
■cellular organization, but also to practise them in detecting 
the various forms of fungi that are injurious to fruits and 
vegetables. Excellent microscopes of the most improved 
patterns and all the necessary chemicals and apparatus for 
preparing and mounting vegetable tissues are used by the 
students. A dark room is attached to this laboratory for 
micro-photographic work. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Le Conte's Geology, Holder's Zoology, Bessey's Botany, Apgar's 
Plant Analysis, Gray's Botany, Plant Dissection (Arthur, Barnes and 
Coulter). 

ALABAMA WEATHER SERVICE. 

The United States Signal Service has established in Ala- 
bama a State system for collecting meteorological data relat- 
ing to climatic changes. The service is now in successful 
•operation with the central office located at this Institute. 
Bulletins are issued at the close of each month, compiled 
from reports sent the Director from numerous stations scat- 
tered throughout the State. An opportunity is thus offered 
the students in Meteorology of becoming familiar with the 
system so long successfully operated by the Department at 
Washington. 
3 









34 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

f 

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

PROFESSOR LANE. 
CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies of this department begin in the sec- 
ond class, and require a good knowledge of Algebra, Geom- 
etry, Trigonometry and Analytical Mechanics. They are 
as follows : 

Second Class — Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic 
curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting 
slop§ stakes, location and construction of common roads 
and railroads. 

First Class — Classification, appearances, defects, season- 
ing, durability and preservation of timber ; classification 
and description of natural building stones; bricks and con- 
cretes ; cast and wrought iron, steel and other metals ; limes, 
cements, mortars and their manufacture; paints and other 
preservatives ; classification of strains an-d a general mathe- 
matical discussion of the same; joints and fastenings; solid 
and open built beams; classification, construction and 
mechanics of masonry; foundations on land and in water; 
bridges and roofs of different kinds ; their construction and 
strains determined mathematically and graphically ; com- 
mon roads, their coverings, location and construction; 
location and construction of railroads ; navigable, irrigation; 
and drainage canals ; river and sea-coast improvements. 

Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Second Class— Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers, Gilles- 
pie's Roads and Railroads, Parson's Track. 

First Class— Wheeler's Civil Engineering, Von Ott's Graphic Statics.. 

DRAWING. 

All of the students of the third and fourth classes are 
required to take Drawing ; but only the students in Me- 
chanics and Engineering in the first and second classes. 

The fourth class is- taught linear drawing and elemen- 
tary graphical mechanics. The third class is instructed m 
the principles of orthographic and isometric projections,. 






^ 



L 



I 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 35 

shades and shadows, practical perspective and tinting. In 
the second class the instruction embraces a more extended 
course in orthographic and isometric drawing, perspective 
shades and shadows and tinting ; also sketches of tools and 
machines, plans, elevations and cross-sections of buildings. 
The first class makes topographical drawings and drawings 
of machines, roofs, bridges, etc., to different scales. Plans, 
profiles and sections of railroad surveys complete the in- 
struction in this department. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Fourth Class — Davidson's Linear Drawing, Broun's Elementary 
Graphical Mechanics. 

Third Class — Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical Perspec- 
tive, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Second Class — Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's Draw- 
ing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the college, 
Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet 

First Class — French, English and American Plates belonging to the 
college, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

AGRICULTURE. 

PROF. NEWMAN. 

The course of instruction in this department embraces, L 
soils; II. plants; III. domestic animals. In the fourth class 
twenty lectures, covering the third term of the session, treat of 
soils, their classification, physical defects and remedies, causes 
of diminished fertility, and the means used to protect them 
from waste and restore fertility, the theory and practice of sur- 
face and sub-drainage, etc. The subject is treated with special 
reference to the different classes of soil in Alabama, omit- 
ting as far as possible questions involving a knowledge of 
chemistry and botany — subjects not taught in the fourth 
class. 

In the third class, in addition to the discussion of the 
physical properties and mechanical treatment of soils, the- 
methods of studying their chemical defects and their reme- 
dies are discussed. The sources of the important elements , 
of plant food and their use upon different soils and plants, 
the restoration of humus, saving home manures, compost^ 









if I 






• ! 

.1 ( 



i 



.36 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

commercial fertilizers, the office of different chemical 
-elements in plant development — the relations of plant 
growth to soil and atmosphere, the theory and practice of 
restoration of crops, terracing and grading to prevent wash- 
ing, plows and plowing— indeed everything connected with 
tilling the soil passes under review as foundation work. 

Southern agriculture is then treated in the concrete— the 
history, nature and cultivation of each of our field crops 
^discussed as regards their adaptation to and treatment upon 
the soils of Alabama. This occupies the first and second 
terms. The third term is devoted to domestic and com- 
mercial horticulture, poultry, sheep, cattle-breeding and 
management of the dairy, etc. In the second class stock- 
breeding and management is completed, and a thorough 
course in pomology, including the propagation of nursery 
stock, planting, manuring, pruning, cultivating, harvesting 
and marketing every species of fruit, treated theoretically 
and practically, occupies the remainder of the session. 
Barry's Fruit Garden, corrected for our latitude, is used in 
this class. In the senior class a series of lectures is deliv- 
ered upon political economy in its special relations to the 
pursuit of agriculture, and the relations of capital and labor 
devoted to agriculture ; the selection, purchase, equipment 
and management of a farm, the ratio between fixed and 
working capital, the employment and management of labor, 
etc, etc. The science of cattle feeding occupies the second 
term, and landscape gardening, treated with special refer- 
ence to the improvement of country homes, occupies the 
remainder of the session. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR LUPTON. ASSISTANTS, WILKINSON AND BURTON. 

Instruction in this department embraces— ^ 

1. A course of lectures in General Chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in Industrial Chemistry. 

3. A course of lectures in Agricultural Chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with each 
course of lectures for the practice of chemical analysis and 
chemical research. 



o. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



37 



1. Course in General Chemistry: This consists of a series 
of lectures (three per week) extending throughout the en- 
tire session, and includes a discussion of the fundamental 
principles of Chemical Philosophy in connection with the 
history, preparation, properties and compounds of the me- 
tallic and non-metallic elements with the main facts and 
principles of Organic Chemistry. In this course the more 
common applications of Chemistry to the Arts and Manu- 
factures are discussed. The apparatus used for experi- 
mental illustration is extensive, containing the newest and 
most approved instruments necessary for presenting the 
subject in the most attractive and instructive form. 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 



Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cook's Chem- 
ical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. The lectures on Industrial Chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion in 
detail of the processes and chemical principles involved in 
the most important applications of Chemistry in the Arts 
and Manufactures to the reduction of ores, the preparation 
of materials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, heating, 
illumination, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suitable 
specimens of raw materials and manufacturing products, 
together with models and diagrams. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Wagner's Chemical Technology, Mu spr a tt . fr Chemistry- as . applied to 
Arts and Manufacturing, Ure's Dictionary, Watt's Dictionary, Rich- 
ardson and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy. 

3. Course in Agricultural Chemistry: This consists of 
lectures on Chemistry in its applications to Agriculture 
(two per week) and includes a thorough discussion of the 
origin, composition and classification of soils, the composi- 
tion and growth of plants, the sources of plant food and 
how obtained, the improvement of soils, the manufacture 
and use of fertilizers, the chemical principles involved in 
the rotation of crops, the feeding of live stock and the vari- 



r 



38 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



ous operations carried on by the intelligent and successful 
agriculturist. 

BOOKS OF REFERENCE. 

Lupton's Elementary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson 
and Cameron's Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storers Agricul- 
ture in relation with Chemistry, Scientific Journals, Reports of the 
United States Department of Agriculture, and the bulletins and reports 
of the various home and foreign Agricultural Departments and Sta- 
tions. 

4. The Course of Systematic Laboratory Work: This 
course of practical work in the Laboratory is carried on in 
connection with each course of lectures, and embraces the 
practical operation of chemical analysis and synthesis, be- 
ing varied somewhat to suit the individual object of the stu- 
dent. 

The Laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
during six days in the week, are amply supplied with every- 
thing necessary for instruction in chemical manipulation, 
in the qualitative and quantitative analysis of soils, fertiliz- 
ers, minerals, mineral waters, technical products, etc., and 
in the method of prosecuting chemical researches. Unusual 
facilities are offered to students who wish to devote their 
time to the special study of practical chemistry. 

A fde of $iD per^ssion isNjharged\each siudeM in tftc 

for theNige oPSt,gpara$u£ \q$ for* 
material. c*msumetl. 

Each student on entering the Chemical Laboratory 
joqiriffi i d to fl e pftoit IS) * m & is furnished with a work-table, a 
set of re-agent bottles, and the common re-agents and appa- 
ratus used in qualitative and quantitative analysis. At 
the close of the session he will be credited with such articles 
as may be returned in good order ; the value of those which 
have been injured or destroyed will be deducted from the 
deposit. 

BOOKS USED. 

In qualitative Analysis — Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In Quantitative Analysis — Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, Rickett's 
Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. In 
Agricultural Chemical Analysis — Church, Frankland. Official methods 
of the Association of Agricultural Chemists. 




AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 



39 



CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

(For description of the building, see page—). . 

The Chemical Apparatus recently purchased for the new Laboratory 
•consists of a full supply of the latest and most approved instruments for 
practical work and investigation. The building is supplied with water 
and gas and every appliance required to meet the demands of modern 
•scientific instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus usually 
supplied to first-class Laboratories, a new and improved Schmidt and 
Haensch's Polariscope has been imported, two 6hort-arm Becker Bal- 
ances of latest pattern, Bunsen Spectroscope, Zeiss' Microscope, and 
other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 



ENGLISH AND LATIN. 



PROF. THACH. 



ENGLISH. 

In this department the students are carried through a sys- 
tematic course of study in the English language and litera- 
ture. In the courses of study which do not include the 
ancient classics, a full course in English is especially im- 
portant. It is, therefore, designed, as much as the time 
allotted permits, to familiarize these students by frequent 
exercises with the standard authors of the language. 

The course of study is as follows : 

Fourth Class.— Five hours a week ; study of Grammar, the 
principles of special and general composition, with frequent 
brief papers illustrating the laws studied. 

Whitney's Essentials, Launsbury's History of English Language, 
Hart's Rhetoric. 

Third Class.— Three hours a week ; study of style, analysis 
of the selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on lit- 
erary and historic themes. 

Hart's Rhetoric, Scudder's American Poems. Weekly exercises in 
declamation are required of members of this class. 

Second Class.— Three hours a week; critical study of 
English Classics, History of English and American Litera- 
ture, Logic, Essays. 

Abbott's How to Write Clearly, Shaw's History of English Literature 
Abbott's English Lessons, Hale's Longer English Poems. 



^^mm 



40 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

First Class.— -Two hours a week, first term ; principles of 
criticism and study of English Classics ; second and third 
terms, Political Economy. Five hours a week, first and sec- 
ond terms: Mental Science; third term, Moral Science. 

Shakespeare's Plays, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Wayland's Science- 
of Wealth, Hickok's Mental Science, Gregory's Christian Ethics. 1 

Three original orations are required during the year of each student 
in the first and second classes. 

LATIN. 

The subjects taught in this department are the Latin 
Language and Literature. 

The modes of instruction are by translation from the Latin 
texts into English a,nd from English into Latin. The con- 
stant use of black-boards adds much to the progress and ac- 
curacy of the student. 

A systematic course of exercises, illustrative of the princi- 
ples of Latin Etymology and Syntax, is carried on in con- 
nection with the reading of the authors prescribed. Special ■ 
attention is given to English derivatives from the Latin, and j 
to the corresponding idioms of the two languages. 

The progress of the student is valued not so much by the 
number of books read as by his ability to read Latin and ex- 
plain the principles of interpretation and construction. 

Latin authors read: 

Fourth Class.— Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Grammar and Compositions 
Third Class. — Cicero, Composition. 
Second Class.— Tacitus, Horace, Selections from Latin Poets and 
Prose writers, Classical Literature. 



r> 






r\ 






J 



PLfiN Of 



OF 



MECHANIC ARTS 

ALA. POLY IN«T. 

fiCALE 3f/«X' 



INDEX 



A 


WORK BE/VCHES 


R 


SPEED LATHE 





BAND /SAW 


S 


MILLING MAC H/NB 


C 


SCROLL. SAW 


T 


ENGINE 





PATTERN LATHS 


U 


DYNAMO 


E 


CIRCULAR SAW 


V 


MOULDING BENCHES 


r 


GRINDSTONE 


w 


CUPOLA 





dUZT>PLAN£R 


X 


BRASS FURNACE 


H 


SURFACE »♦ 


V 


FORGES 


J 


Dfl/LL PRESS 


z 


ANVILS 


K 


FILING BENCHES 


a 


WOOD LATHES 


L 


ENGINE LATHES 


b 


BLOWERS 


M 


BEACH GRINDER 


e 


HEATER 


N 


TOOL »• 


d 


PUMP 





POST DRILL 


a 


BOILER 


P 


SHAPES 


f 


CLOSETS 


a 


PLANER 


9 


SINKS 




7l 6HArT t/zvrs 






/< BENCHES' 










C himniy 



. 




■\ 



V 



I 



— 



i 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 4! 

MECHANIC ARTS. 

G. H. BRYANT, B. S., INSTRUCTOR. N 

The course in Manual Training covers three years, as fol- 
lows: First year, wood- working— carpentry and turning; 
second year, pattern-making and foundry and forge work- 
moulding, casting and smithing ; third year, machine shop- 
chipping and filing and machine work in metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the three I 

lower classes (5th, 4th and 3d). For satisfactory reasons a 
student may be excused from this laboratory work by the 
Faculty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in three I 

exercises of two hours each. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 1 ] 

from a twenty-five horse-power Harris-Corliss automatic engine, which 
is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel horizontal tubular j 

boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the feed water form a part of 
the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial brick boiler-, 
house and chimney have been erected. 

The equipment for the wood-working shop comprises the following: 
20 double wood- working benches, each with complete set of carpenter's ? 

tools; 20 turning-lathes, io-inch swing, each with complete set of tools ^ 
1 double circular saw; x band saw; 1 board-planing machine; 1 buzz 1 

planer; 2 scroll saws (power); 1 large pattern-maker's lathe, 16-inch 
swing; i 36-inch grindstone. In addition to these, the tool -room is sup- 
plied with a variety of extra hand-tools for special work. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of moulding-benches for 12 
students, each supplied with a complete set of moulder's tools ; a 14-inch 
cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of melting 1,000 pounds 
of iron per hour ; a brass furnace in which can be melted 100 pounds of 
brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, etc. Also a full supply of 
ladles, large and small moulding flasks, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 12 hand-forges of new pattern, 
each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast for all the forges 
is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower (which also 
furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No. 15 Sturtevant exhaust 
blower draws the smoke from the fires into the smoke-flues and forces 
it out through the chimney. 

The machine tools in the machine department are as follows: 6 en- 
gine-lathes (screw-cutting) 14-inch swing, 6 foot bed; 2 engine-lathes 16- 
inch swing (one with taper attachment); 1 speed lathe, 10-inch swing; 1 

20-inch drill-press (power feed); 1 15-inch shaper; 1 22-inch x 22-inch x 

*8 



1 



4 2 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



5-foot friction planer; i universal milling machine; i corundum tool- 
grinder (14-inch wheel); 1 bench grinding-machine (small); 1 post drill 
press (14-inch). A part of this room is set apart for vise- work— chipping 
and filing — and benches for 12 students are provided, each with vise and 
sets of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool-room is to be found a 
good supply of machinists' tools for general shop use, such as lathe and 
drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, files, cutting and meas- 
uring tools, and special appliances for machine work, etc. 

The nature of the work in each department is as follows : 

1st year. 

I. A course of carpentry (hand work covering the first 
term and part of the second or about five months). 

The lessons include instruction on the nature and use of 
tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary- 
work with plane, saw, chisel, etc., different kinds of joints — 
timber-splices, cross joints, mortice and tennon, miter and 
frame work, dovetail work comprising different kinds of 
joints used in cabinet making, light cabinet work, examples 
in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning extending through the three months 
-of the third term. The lessons comprise, first, nature and 
use of lathe and tools, plain straight turning, caliper work 
to different diameters and lengths, simple and compound 
•curves, screw-plate and chuck-work, hollow and spherical 
turning. 

2nd year. 

I. A course in pattern-making covering the first ha -If of 
the first term. The work includes a variety of examples of 
whole and split patterns, core work, etc., giving the students 
familiarity with the use of patterns for general moulding. 

II. *A course in moulding and casting in iron and brass oc- 
cupying ten weeks. The work consists for the most part of 
small articles, such as light machine parts, but a sufficient 
variety of forms are introduced for the student to acquire a 
.good general and practical knowledge of the usual methods 
and appliances used in light foundry work. Most of the 
work is in green sand in two-part flasks'; core work is also 
.given, and some three-part flask and some dry sand work 
is introduced. 



* 



1 



j 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 43 

The same patterns which have been previously made by 
students are used, besides special patterns for occasional 
larger or more complicated work. Instruction and practice is 
given in working the cupola, each student in turn taking 
charge of a melting. 

III. A course in forge-work in iron and steel occupying 
the remainder of the year* The lessons are arranged so that 
the students, in making the series of objects, become familiar 
with the nature of the metals and the successive steps in 
working them by hand into simple and complex forms, as 
drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, welding by 
various methods, tool forging, tempering, hardening, etc. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lect- 
ures is given on the metallurgy and working of the metals 
used in the industrial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, 

^tc. 

3rd year. 

I. A course in chipping and filing covering the first term. 
The lessons comprise work on cast and wrought iron : chip- 
ping to line on flat and curved surfaces, key-seating, etc.; 
filing and finishing to line (straight and curved), surface fil- 
ing and finishing, fitting, slotting, dovetail work, sliding and 
tight fits, sawing, pin, screw and key filing, surface finishing 
with scraper^c. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the year. 
The work includes cast and, wrought iron, steel and brass : 
Turning to various diameters and lengths, taper turning, fac- 
ing with chuck and face plate, drilling — both in lathe and drill 
press — reaming, boring, screw cutting in lathe and with taps 
and dies, planing, slotting, etc., with planer and shaper, mill- 
ing various forms with the milling machine, fitting, grind- 
ing, polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various sub- 
jects connected with machine work in metals: such as forms, 
construction and use of the various machines, cutting tools, 
gearing, gauges, screw threads, etc. Duing the last term 
some piece of construction work is given the classes. 

Instruction is generally given, first, by black-board draw- 
ings or sketches which the student copies, with dimensions 



■■■■ 



44 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

in note-book, with which each one provides himself; thus 
each one works from his own notes. This is supplemented, 
whenever necessary, by the actual construction of the lesson 
by the instructor before the class ; second by inspection and 
direction at the bench by the instructor. 

Students desiring to pursue the study of applied mechan- 
ics beyond the above course will take a special course of 
Steam and Mill Engineering, supplemented by experiment 
and practice with the apparatus, including steam genera- 
tion and the forms, construction and use of steam-boilers 
and accompanying apparatus ; steam as a motive power, and 
forms, construction and use of the steam engine, with the 
study and use of the indicator ; transmission of powers- 
shafting, belting, gearing, etc.; also elementary theoretical 
mechanism. 

Noti.— The work in the forge and foundry rooms was omitted the present ses- 
sion, the rooms being occupied by the professor of chemistry. 

MODERN LANGUAGES AND HISTORY. 

GEORGE PETRIE, ADJUNCT PROFESSOR. 
MODERN LANGUAGES. 

The following regular courses are given in French and 
German: 

French— First year : Three recitations a week. During 
this year the principal object is to acquire facility in reading 
ordinary French at sight ; and to this end, the student 
starts reading at an early stage and is practiced continually 
in sight reading and in previously assigned selections. 

Second year: Three recitations a week. During this 
year more difficult and varied French is read, and careful 
instruction is given upon the laws of grammar and the con- 
struction of the language, while the principles thus learned 
are illustrated and impressed by frequent exercises in ren- 
dering English into French. 

German.— One year : Five recitations a week. In this 

course the aim and the methods are similar to those in the 
first year in French. 




— . 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 45 

Special Courses. — In addition to these regular courses, ad- 
ditional classes are formed for special study of the literature, 
or for special study in any particular direction desired, when 
the number of students desiring it is sufficient. 

HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much to memorize 
facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is laid on 
the fact that History is not a succession of isolated facts, 
but a progressive whole, each event being at once the cause 
and the effect ot other events. This causal relation of events 
is closely studied and the students are taught to investigate 
for themselves the growth of ideas, and to trace particularly 
their development in the United States, so as to acquire a 
practical knowledge of the history and present working of 
our government arid institutions. The knowledge acquired 
is rendered clear and permanent by frequent comparisons of 
customs and laws, and also by diagrams, charts and 
maps. Instruction is given by lectures and text-books, 
while investigation is stimulated hy requiring essays and 
by holding frequent discussions in the class-room. 

The course covers one year and part of the next, an4 em- 
braces the history of the United States, studies on our gov- 
ernment and its institutions and on general history. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

LIEUT. RICHARDS, U. S. ARMY, COMMANDANT. 

• 

* Military Science and Tactics are required to be taught in 
this Institution by law. This law is faithfully carried out 
by imparting to each student, not physically incapacitated 
to bear arms, practical instruction in the School of the 
Soldier, of the Company and of the Battalion ; also in Guard 
Mountings, Inspections, Dress Parades, Reviews, etc. 

Under Section 1225 U. S. Revised Statutes, the College is 
provided with modern Cadet rifles and accoutrements and two 
pieces of field artillery. Ammunition for practice firing is 
used under the direction of an experienced officer. 








46 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

The following uniform of standard cadet gray cloth has 
been prescibed for dress, viz. : Coats and pants as worn at 
West Point, with sack coat for fatigue, dark blue cadet cap, 
white helmet for dress occasions. 

A very neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained here 
at $18. This is less expensive than the usual clothing. 
All students are required to wear this uniform during the 
session. 

The drills are short and the military duty involves no 
hardships. The military drill is a health-giving exercise, 
and its good effects in the development of the physique and 
improvement of the carriage of the cadet are manifest. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
Xhe officers are selected for proficiency in drill, deportment 
and studies. Each company is officered by one Captain, one 
1st Lieutenant, one 2nd Lieutenant, and with a proper num- 
ber of Sergeants and Corporals. The officers and non-com- 
missioned officers are distinguished by appropriate insignia of 
rank. These appointments are conferred by the President 
on nomination of the Commandant. 

Privates of the first class may be excused by the Faculty 
from all military drill except battalion drill. 

The first and second classes recite once a week in Military 
Tactics. 

POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 

There are three Post-Graduate Degrees-MASTER OF SCIENCE, MINING 
ENGINEER and CIVIL ENGINEER. 

A Post-Graduate Degree may be obtained by a graduate 
of this College, or of any other institution of equal grade, by 
one year's residence at the College, spent in the successful 
prosecution of a course of study in applied science prescribed 
by the Faculty. 

Candidates must also present to the Faculty a satisfactory 
thesis, showing independent investigation upon some subject 
pertaining to their course of study, and must pass a satis- 
factory examination on the course of study prescribed. 

Applicants for Post-Graduate Degree are by order of the 
Board permitted to matriculate without payment of fees, 




— 



AGRICULTURAL, AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 47 

except laboratory fees for those who work in the chemical 
laboratory. 

They are subject to the general regulations as other stu- 
dents, but are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates, who are not candidates for a degree, are 
permitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in any 
department of the College, except chemical laboratory, with- 
out payment of regular fees. 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions will be awarded in the different subjects of 
each class to those students whose grade for the entire year 
is above 90 per cent., and who have satisfactorily passed 
all the regular examinations of that session. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on Com- 
mencement day to those who obtain three Distinctions.. 
For the first class four Distinctions are required. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are 
kept by the officers of instruction, in a form adapted to per- 
manent preservation. 

From the record a monthly circular, or statement, is sent 
to the parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written recitations, or monthly examinations on the 
studies of the month, are held at the option of the professor. 

At the end of each term written or oral examinations, or 
both, are held on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations are held only by ord<^ of the Fac- 
ulty, and in no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final 
examination can be promoted to full standing to the next 
higher class only on satisfactory examinations at the open- 
ing of the next session. 

It is required that every student who enters the College 
shall remain through the examinations at the end of the 
term. Leaves of absence and honorable discharges will r 






• 



•l 



^> 



48 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

therefore, not be granted within six weeks of the examina- 
tions, except in extreme cases. 

Examinations for degrees or certificates of proficiency em- 
brace the entire subject of study in the course. 

LIBRARY. 

A temporary room is appropriated to the Library until 
the completion of the College building, but the number of 
books at present is not large. Additions are made annually. 

The Library is open at stated times, when students are 
permitted to select books according to regulations prescribed 

by the Faculty. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of. the College is administered by the 
President and Faculty in accordance with the code of laws 
and regulations enacted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study, and punctuality in attendance on reci- 
tations and all other duties, is required of every student. 

Students are not allowed to have in their possession 
weapons or arms not issued for the performance of military 
duty. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and 
also to attend the church of their choice at least once on 
Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes 
every Sunday. - 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized, and through its 
weekly meetings exerts a wholesome Christian influence 
among the students of the College. 

The following students are the officers of the Association : 

Fontaine Broun, President. 

C. H. Ross, Vice-President. 

A. C. Crowder, Secretary. 

Frank Philips, Corresponding Secretary. 

Hugh M. Taylor, Treasurer, 

i 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 49 

LOCATION. 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, sixty miles 
east of Montgomery, directly on the line of the Western Rail- 
road. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general good 
health and entire freedom from malaria, having an elevation 
of eight hundred and twenty-one feet above tide- water. By 
statute of the State, the sale of spirituous liquors and keep- 
ing saloons of any kind are forbidden. 

THESIS. 

Each applicant for a regular degree is required to write and 
submit to the Faculty a thesis on a subject of immediate 
relation to some study of his course, and deliver the same at 
Commencement, if required by the Faculty. 

This thesis must be given to the professor of English by 
the first day of May. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two Literary Societies— the Wirt and Webster- 
ian — connected with the College. 

These Societies hold celebrations on the evenings of 
Thanksgiving Day and the 22d of February, and also on 
Tuesday evening of Commencement week. They elect ann u- 
ally, with the approval of the Faculty, an orator to repre- 
sent them at the close of the year. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The Annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the Society, 
is delivered in the chapel during Commencement week. The 
following are officers of the Society : 

T. H. Frazer, M. D., President ; J. C. Street, Vice-Presi- 
dent; C. C. Thach, Treasurer and Secretary; Caleb Lindsey, 
Mobile, Alabama, Orator 1888; J. E. D. Shipp, Georgia, Al- 
ternate. 

BOARDING. 

The College has no barracks or dormitories, and the stu- 
dents board with the families of the town of Auburn, and 



50 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

thus enjoy all the protecting and beneficial influences of the 
family circle. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it is 
to report those who, without permission, leave their rooms 
after the " call to quarters," or are guilty of any violation of 
order. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not per- 
mitted to make changes without obtaining permission from 

the President. ♦ 

* 

EXPENSES. *sT* 

Incidental fee, per half session 4fr 30' 

Library fee, per half session 1 00 

Surgeon's fee, per half session 2 50 

Board per month, with fuel and lights $12 to 14 00 

These fees are payable, $11 on matriculation and $11 on 
February 1st. By order of the Board, no fees can be re- 
mitted. 

There is no charge for tuition. 

The surgeon is required to visit daily the cadets reported 
sick, and to give all requisite medical' attendance without 
other charge than the regular surgeon's fee. 

By messing the cost of board has been reduced by a few 
students to $8.50 per month. For students entering after 
January 1st, the fees for half session only are required. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required, to be deposited 
by each student on matriculation, to cover any special or 
general damages to College property for which he may be 
liable. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent fee, 
or the unexpended balance, will be refunded to the student. 

. FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the 
Treasurer of the College all funds desired for sons or wards, 
whether for regular charges of College fees and board, or for 



L 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 5 1 

■any other purpose. It is the duty of this officer to keep 
.safely all funds placed in his hands, and to pay all expenses 
incurred by the students, including board, uniform, books, 
etc., only when approved by the President. 

When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treas- 
urer of the College by the cadet to pay his necessary expenses. 
These checks are paid only when approved by the President. 
The President will only approve for necessary expenses, as 
stated in the catalogue, unless specially requested in writing 
by the parent. 

To cover the expenses of fees, books, uniform and board 
for one month, not less than $5(Tshould be deposited with 
the Treasurer on matriculation. 

The attention of parents is called to the following law en- 
acted by the Trustees : 

When a student matriculates, all money required to pay the College 
fees, and all other moneys in his possession, must be deposited with the 
Treasurer, unless the President shall receive special instruction from the 
parent or guardian to the contrary. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. . 




The Academic Year commences on the££beeafch of Septem- 
ber and ends on the second Wednesday after the first Mon- 
day in June following, which is Commencement day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the last week in Decem- 
ber ; the second term begins January 1st and ends March 
31st ; the third term continues from April 1st to the close of 
the session. 



RESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 

The following resolution was adopted by the Trustees : 

That in view of increased facilities for instruction in Agriculture and 
the technical departments of education now possessed by this College, 
especially in the department of Mechanic Arts, made possible by the re- 
cent donation from the State, the Faculty are authorized, in addition to 
the legal name of this College, to print on the catalogue the words 
ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, as significant of the 
expanded system of practical instruction in industrial science in the course 
of education now provided for. 



v 



<XQ1 



$12 



Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



looo 



K^ 



OCLC: 36819601 
Enteredi 19970429 



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19970429 
Lang: eng 
Ctry: alu 
Alph : a 
1873,1893 1 



*e f *f u *g b *h a *i u *j p I 



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AAAA I 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama, f 
Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama *h [microform] 1 

► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 10 246 10 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Auburn, Alabama f 

► 11 246 10 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 

Alabama 1 

► 12 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 

Auburn, Alabama 1 



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Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, I 

21 v. ; *c 21 cm. I 

Annual I 

1872-73-1892-93. 1 

Title varies slightly. 1 

Microfilm. *m 1873-1893. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 



*d 1997. *c microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. 1 



d *b 1873 *c 1893 *d alu *e u *f u *g a 1 
Universities and colleges *z Alabama *x Periodicals. I 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 



► 19 539 

► 20 650 

► 21 610 20 

Periodicals. 1 

► 22 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue and 
circular of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1 

► 23 785 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute f 

► 24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project 1 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

CATALOGUE 
1888-89 



AUBURN UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY 






This book must not be taken 
from the Library building. 






CAT.2- 



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tale 




ri cultural 




lyfecr 



ecKaaical ( olleee. 




ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 



1889. 



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AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 




r 






CATALOGUE 



/ 



OF THE 




late Jtpiiltoral and Meclianical foiled 



. . 



I' 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 



1888-'89- 



AUBURN, ALABAMA. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



.? 



His Excellency THOMAS SEAY, President ex-officio 

Hon. SOLOMON PALMER, Superintendent of Education..ex-officio 

Hon. JONATHAN HARALSON (term expires 1895.).., Selma 

Hon. R. F. LIGON .(term expires 1895.) Tuskegee 

Hon. JOHN W. BISHOP (term expires 1895.) Talladega 

Hon. C. C. LANGDON 'term expires 1893.) Mobile 

Hon. R. F. KOLB *. (term expires 1893.) Eufaula 

Hon. J. B. MITCHELL (term expires 1893.) Seale 

Hon. J. G. GILCHRIST (term expires 189 1.).... Montgomery 

Hon. M. L. STANSEL.... (term expires 189 1.) Carrollton 

Hon. C. C. HARRIS (term expires 1891.) Decatur 



E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. 

F. M. REESE, Secretary and Auditor. 



Note.— The College Building represented in the engraving is now in 
process of construction, and will be completed in October. 



■i 



fit 

/O * 7/ ^J 

i #7 Co 

d.^ FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



•BARKSDALE 



26*84 WM Le roy BROUN, M. A., LL. D., 

President, and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, M. E., Ph. D., 
Professor of Natural History and Geology. 

JAMES H. LANE, C. E., A. M., 
Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

J. S. NEWMAN, 
Professor of Agriculture and Director of Experiment Station. 

CHARLES C. THACH, B. E., 

Professor of English and Latin. 

N. T. LUPTON, A. M* M. D., LL. D., 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

Lieut. JOHN B. McDONALD, ioth Calvary U. S. A., (West Point) 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 

GEORGE H. BRYANT, M. E., (Mass. Inst. Technology) 
Director of Laboratory and Instructor of Mechanic Arts. 

GEORGE PETRIE, M. A., (Univ. Va.) 
Adjunct Professor of Modern Languages and History. 

L. W. WILKINSON, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Chemical Laboratory. 

J.J. WILMORE, M.E., 
B. A. BLAKEY, M. Sc, 

Assistant Instructors in Mechanic Arts. 

S. C. PITTS, B. Sc, * • 
J. T. GREGORY, B. Sc, 
G. F. BROUN, B. Sc, f 
Assistants in Mathematics and English. 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D., 

Surgeon. 

C. C. THACH, 

Librarian and Recording Secretary. 

O. D. SMITH, 
Corresponding Secretary. 

* Resigned January 1st, 1889. 
t Appointed January 1st, 1889. 



I 



207874. 



OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Agricultural [Experiment Oration 



SOJLSSI5 OP "VTCSlTOieS. 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION: 

J. G. GILCHRIST, 

R. F. LIGON, 

J. B. MITCHELL. . 



OPPICBRS OP THE ST-A-TXCIfcT : 

W. L. Broun ;T- Pre u de ^ 

T S Newman Director and Agriculturist 

N. T. Lupton Vice Di rector and Chemist 

* " »*_„. , Botanist 

*P. H. Mell 

Biologist* 

ASSiaTAUTS : 

Isaac Ross, First Asst. Agriculturist in Charge of Live Stock and Dairy 

Jas. Clayton Second Assistant Agriculturist 

J.f. Anderson, Ph. D First Assistant Chemist 

L W. Wilkinson, M. Sc Second Assistant Chemist 

P L. Hutchinson • Third Assistant Chemist 

T. D. Samford, B. Sc Assistant Botanist 

•Prof. Mell has also charge of Meteorological Observations. 



OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 



S 



*"" 



The leading object of the College, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, is to 
teach the principles and the applications of science. 

In its courses of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially those that relate 
to agriculture and the mechanic arts, so far as the facilities 
at its disposal will permit ; and at the same time the discip- 
line obtained by the stucty v of languages and other sciences 
is not neglected. vs 

All students are required to study the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to students in any 
pourse. l - \ 

The special or technical instruction given is thus based on 
a sound, general education. 

The College, in fact, has become a distinctive school of in- 
dustrial science— or Polytechnic Institute— a title which 
by resolution of the trustees is permitted to be inscribed on 
the catalogue— and work of grea,t value to tjpe youth of the 
State is now being accomplished by fitting them, by a thor- 
ough science-discipline, in which handcraft in the lower 
classes is made a prominent feature, for the successful and 
honorable performance of the responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline of 
the students in endeavoring to train them to habits of accu- 
rate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them for the duties 
of life, their moral and Christian training will always con- 
stitute the prominent care and thought of the Faculty. 



■^ 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR 

INSTRUCTION. 



The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory 
instruction in applied science in the following departments : 

I. — IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres and is suppliel with illustra- 
tive specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in con- 
nection with the College, where experiments and scientific 
investigations relating to agriculture are daily made, affords 
unusual opportunities to students to become familiar with 
agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where lectures 
are delivered in presence of the object discussed, and during 
the year exercises in practical agriculture and horticulture" 
of an educational character are given the students who enter 
upon this course of study. 

II.— IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of Mechanic Arts is used as an auxiliary 
in industrial education, as a school of manual training in 
the arts that constitute the foundation of various industrial 
pursuits. The work performed by the students is instructive 
in character, as in any other laboratory, and the classes are 
taught in sections by a series of graded lessons under the 
supervision of the professor. In the lower classes of the 
College each student enters this school, and is aesigued three 
exercises a week, each exercise being two hours long. 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade, but 
to educate, to discipline and train the eye and the hand, as 
well as the mind, and thus, by associating manual and men- 
tal training, to thoroughly educate the student for the 
duties of life, whatever his vocation may be. There is no 
attempt to teach students spocial skill in constructing arti- 



r-N/. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 7 

cles of commercial value, but all the exercises are systemati- 
cally arranged and designed for purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall 
90x50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse power 
Corliss engine, . with indicator, a planer, circular saw, 
band-saw, two scroll saws, a buzz planer, twenty stands with, 
lathes, with full sets of lathe and carpentry tools required 
for instruction. 

A brick building with two rooms, each 30x35 feet, has 
been constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with twelve forges and tools required 
for a forge department, the other with a cupola furnace, 
having a capacity of 1,000 pounds, a core oven, moulding 
benches and special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a Sturt- 
evant fan and exhauster, Applied with power from the en- 
gine. 

The machine department is equipped with eight engine 
lathes— one speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one post 
drill, one shaper, one five-foot planer, one universal milling 
machine, a corundum tool-grinder and small emery grinder. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches and vises for twelve students. 

The Weston dynamo of five horse-power, used at present 
for lighting the halls, is located in the large hall of the Me- 
chanic Art laboratory. r 

It is designed, when the buildings now under construction 
are completed, to supply the different laboratories with elec- 
tricity by this dynamo. 

Ill, — IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The new chemical laboratory is supplied with new and 
modern apparatus, and in its entire equipment affords ex- 
cellent facilities for instruction in practical chemistry. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this laboratory 
by scientific experts, in connection with the work of the ag- 
ricultural experiment station, are of especial value to ad- 
vanced students, and afford them unusual opportunities to 
learn the methods of scientific research. The building con- 



8 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

tains a large general laboratory that will accommodate sixty 
students, and lecture room with capacity for one hundred 
seats and nine other rooms, all appropriated to instruction 
and research in chemistry. 

It is equipped with the improved modern .appliances nec- 
essary for instruction and investigation. 

IV# _j N PHYSICS AND MINERALOGY. 

In the main College structure, now being rebuilt, provis- 
ion will be made for laboratory work in these and in other 
departments of science. Temporary rooms are now used, 
and apparatus is supplied as demanded by the work of the 
College. 

V. — IN BOTANY, ETC. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station, inves- 
tigations in botany and entomology will be given special 
attention, and unusual opportunities will be offered ad- 
vanced students for practical work in these departments in 
laboratories especially fitted with appliances for research. 

VI. — IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work has been provided 
for the use of students, and the customary exercises in the 
field are given. 

VII. — IN DRAWING. 

All the students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 
well as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observation 
and execution. 

VIII. — IN MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity 
with the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of 
regular military drill, and in addition the military system 
is used as a means of enforcing discipline and securing good 
order, promptness and regularity in the performance of aca- 
demic duties. 

This department is under the charge of Lieut. J. B. Mc- 
Donald, 10th Cavalry, U. S. A. 



'. AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 9 

It has recently been supplied with new cadet muskets 
and accoutrements for the corps, arid for artillery practice, 
with two three-inch rifle guns, carriages and limbers. 



COLLEPE BUILDINGS. 

The main College building was destroyed by fire on the 24th of June, 
1887. The frontispiece is an engraving of the building, *6o by 71 feet, 
now in process of construction. It will contain, exclusive of the base- 
ment story, thirty -five rooms. This building will not be used for dor- 
mitories for students, but will be appropriated for purposes of instruc- 

1 

tion. It will contain the lecture rooms and offices of the professors' 
laboratories, library, museum, armory, etc. In October next all the 
departments of the college will be in their permanent rooms in the new 
building. 




CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The new chemical laboratory is a handsome two-story structure, 40 
by 60 feet, with a rear projection 35 by 60 feet of one story and basement. 
The exterior is of pressed brick, with cut stone trimmings, and terra- 
cotta ornamentation. 



V 7 









IO 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



I 













FIRST FLOOR. 

A, Spectroscope and polariscope room; B, Assistant's private room; C, Com- 
bustion-furnace room. 

( 

On entering, the first room to the left is the office of the professor, to 
the rear of which is the library and balance- room. On the right, ex- 
tending the whole length of the floor, is the State laboratory and labora- 
tory for research. Two small rooms are cut off from this, one a balance- 
room, and the other for the spectroscope and polariscope. Leading 



msm 



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AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



II 



from the rear of the main hall is the door which enters the large lab- 
oratory for general work. Two rooms are cut off from this — one for 
combustion furnaces and the other a private working-room for the 
assistant. 




SECOND FLOOR. 



In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and contains 
the latest improved working-tables, with water, gas and every necessary 
appliance for chemical work. Niches in the wall opposite each work- 
ing-table, with hoods where necessary, connect with flues, and furnish 



12 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLBGE. 

the best possible means of escape for deleterious vapors, while ventilators 
in the ceiling furnish additional means for getting rid of noxious gases. 
The pitch is sixteen feet in the clear, with paneled ceiling of oiled south- 
ern pine. The rooms are wainscoted throughout and finished in natural 
wood. 

The second story contains a lecture-room and room for gas analysis. 
Around this lecture room are cases for containing crude and manufac- 
tured products, illustrating the subjects of agricultural and industrial 
chemistry, which are prominent subjects taught in this institution. 

LANGDON HALL. • 

This is a two- story building, ninety by fifty feet. The second story is 
the audience hall, used for commencement and other public occasions. 

The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of Mechanic Arts. 
This building is at present temporarily used for recitation rooms, and 
will continue to be so used until the completion of the new College 
building. 



I 



X^ 



/ 



/ 



L 



s 



GRADUATES IN 1888. 



CLASS OF 1888. 



WITH DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (B. Sc.) 



Cyrus Washington Ashcraft, 
Robert Love Bennett, 
George Fleming Broun, 
Fontaine Brou n, 
Henry Lee Broun, 
John Hodges Drake, Jr., 
Edmund Wiley Foster, 
John Thomas Gregory, • 
Eugene Willis Harris, 
George AlDner Huguley, 
William Lyman, 
Edwin Conway Macartney,. 
Thomas Drake Samford, 
Otis Oliver Smith, 
Samuel Oliver Taylor, 



Clay. 

Texas. 

Lee. 

1 

West Virginia. 

Virginia. 

Lee. 

Mobile. 

Lauderdale. 

Lee. 

Georgia. 

Shelby. 

Mobile. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Lee. 



WITH.DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE. (M. Sc.) 



Vassar Lyle Allen, B. Sc, 
Edward Read Lloyd, B. Sc, 
Wilson Herbert Newman, B. Sc, 
Charles Woodard Simmons, B. Sc 



Montgomery 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Dale. 



WITH DEGREE OF CIVIL ENGINEER. (C. E.) 



Charles Hunter Ross, B. Sc, 



Lee. 



©isiiaguished <§tudents. 



AWARDED HONOR CERTIFICATES IN 1888. 



The students of each class, who secure a grade 
above 90 in three or more subjects, are dis- 
tinguished for excellence in scholar- 
ship, and are awarded 



The following students received honor certificates in 1888 : 



* FIRST CLASS. 




Cyrus Washington Ashcraft, 


. Clay. 


Robert Love Bennett. • , ■ 


Texas. 


George Fleming Broun, 


Lee. 


Fontaine Broun, ... 


West Virginia. 


Henry Lee Broun, 


Virginia. 


John Hodges Drake, Jr., . . 


Lee. 


John Thomas Gregory, 


Lauderdale. 


William Lyman, 


Shelby. 


Edwin Conway Macartney, 


Mobile. 


Thomas Drake Samford, . . 


. Lee.* 


Otis Oliver Smith, 


Lee. 


SECOND CLASS. 


• 


Thomas Jefferson Brooks, 


Georgia. 


Aaron Jason Burr, 


• Georgia. 


Boiling Hall Crenshaw, 


Butler. 


Howard Grayson Crowder, 


• St. Clair. 


Howard Staten Doster, • 


Autauga. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



IS 



Percival Lewis Dryer, 
Walter Davis Dunlap, 
Arthur St Charles Dunstan, 
Pleasant Lee Hutchinson, 
Oscar Don Killebrew, 
Frank Phillips, 
Hugh McGehee Taylor, 
Paul Turner Vaughan, . 
Frederick Henry Vernon, 
Thomas Morgan Watlington, 

THIRD CLASS. 

Benjamin Cheney Abernethy, 
Houston Franklin Cooper, 
George Woodhull Emory, . . 
William Francis Feagan, 
Daniel Gillis, . 
William Groce Harrison, 
Robert Edward Daniel Irvin, 
Felix Hope Leslie, , 

Frank Davis Milstead, 
Herbert Payne Robertson, 
William Walter Robinson, . . 
Dixon Hamilton Tharin, 
George Houston Waring, 
James Fielden Wilkinson, 

FOURTH CLASS. 

Lawrence Earnest Baker, 
Harmon Benton, . . 

Frank Jarvis Bivins, . . • 
James Albert Cox, 
Arthur Thomas Dudley, 
Beverly Franklin Harwood, 
Hendley Varner Kell, . 
Frank Allemong Lupton, ♦ 
Wm. Audley Marshall, . 
Joseph Hardy Spence, . 
Joseph Leslie Tucker, . 



Macon. 

Dallas. 

Shelby. 

Georgia. 

Dale. 

Florida. 

Lee. 

Dallas. 

Chambers. 

Marengo. 

Florida. 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Bullock. 

Georgia. 

Talladega. 

Lee. 

Russell. 

Elmore. 

Lowndes. 

Tallapoosa. 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Dale. 

Jefferson. 

Barbour. 

Georgia. 

Lee, 

Georgia. 

Perry. 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Georgia. 

Talledega. 

Shelby. 



' '■"' ' ' l '— W"^^BBB 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



FOR THE SESSION 1888-'89. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

[Residence is Alabama when State is not named.'] 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE 


George Fleming Broun, B. Sc, . 


. Lee. 


John Hodges Drake, Jr., B. Sc., 


Lee. 


John Thomas Gregory, B. Sc., . 


. Lauderdale. 


Eugene Willis Harris, B. Sc, 


Lee. 


Sterling Chambers Pitts, B. Sc, 


. Russell. 


Augustus Archilaus Persons, B. Sc, 


Lee. 


Thomas Drake Samford, B. Sc, . 


. Lee. 


UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS. 


FIRST CLASS. 


r 


Leslie Dallas Burdett, . . . 


Georgia. 


Aaron Jason Burr, .... 


. Georgia. 


John Robertson Clower, .... 


Lee. 


Edmund Collins Cochran, 


Montgomery 


Abednego Jackson Crawford, 


. Lee. 


Boiling Hall Crenshaw, 


. Butler. 


Arthur Campbell Crowder, 


Jefferson. 


Howard Grayson Crowder, 


Jefferson. 


Howard Staten Doster, 


Autauga. 


Percival Lewis Dryer, 


Macon. 


Arthur St. Clair Dunstan, . . 


Virginia. 


Pleasant Lee Hutchinson, 


Georgia. 


Oscar Don Killebrew, 


Dale. 


Andrew Manly Lloyd, .. ! 


Lee. 


William Lane Martin, . 


. Jefferson. 


M. Downer Pace, . * . 


Macon. 



v.. 



■M 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 1 7 



James Miles Quarles, A. B., 
Thomas Alexander Ross, 
Edgar Johnson Spratling, 
Hugh McGehee Taylor, 
Paul Turner Vaughan, 
Frederick Henry Vernon, 
Thomas Morgan Watlington, 
Norman Rutherford Weaver. 



SECOND CLASS. 



Benjamin Cheney Abernethy, 
James William Bivins, 
Benjamin Wilbur Breedlove, 
Wilmer Calloway, 
Edward Lawrence Chambliss, 
George Samuel Clark, 
Walter Girard Cook, 
George Woodhull Emory, 
Stonewall Jackson Emory, 
Francis Maury Fontaine, Jr., 
Daniel Gillis, .-.'... „, 
William Groce Harrison, 
Robert Edward Daniel Irvin, 
Hunter Allen Lang, 
Lionel Clarence Levy, 
John Hammond Little, . 
Francis Brooks Matthews, . 
Wilmot Bivins Matthews, 
Frank Davis Milstead, . 
John Milton, 
Robert Ernest Noble, . 
James Turner Persons, 
Reuben Hayne Poole, . 
Edward Clyde Powers, 
Edward Hill Pritchett, 
James Edward Ray, 
Herbert Payne Robertson, 
Frank Ford Snedecqr, 
2 



y 



• • 



y 



Clay. 

Lee. 

Chambers. 

Montgomery. 

Dallas. 

Chambers. 

Marengo. 

Dallas. 



Florida. 

Lee. 

Macon. 

Montgomery. 

Wilcox. 

Montgomery. 

Lowndes. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Talladega. 

Lee. 

Jefferson, 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Elmore. 

Florida. 

Calhoun. 

Russell. 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Lowndes. 

Marshall. 

Lowndes. 

Jefferson. 



1 8 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 



Percy Willett Terry, 
McKennie Thomas, 
Thomas Chilton Thorington, 
, George Houston Waring, 
William Gameron Weisinger, 
James Fielder Wilkinson, 
Joseph Archibald Williams. 



. • 



THIRD CLASS. 



Robert Sidney Adair, 
Lawrence Ernest Baker, 
Paul Bedell, . . ' . 

Harmon Benton, 
Frank Jarvis Bivins, 
Thomas Jefferson Boyd, 
Seaborn Jesse Buckalew, 
Edgar Duncan Burts, 
James Albert Cox, 
James Nathaniel Dean, 
John Christian Driver, 
Arthur Thomas Dudley, 
Oscar Eberhart, 
Walter Edward Fitzgerald, 
Jackson Wise Gammill, 
William Thomas Glass, 
Charles Bowles Glenn, 
Douglas Francis Gordon, 
Benjamin Gillis Grant, 
William Hartman Hahr, 
Dorian Hall, • . 

Clifford Le Roy Hare, 
Bryant Clower Harvey, 
Beverly Franklin Harwood, 
Belus Ephraim Hudson, 
Cadmus Newton Hughes, 
Fletcher Moore Hurt, 
Charles Cicero Johnson, 
John Allen Jones, 



Jefferson. 

Coosa. 

Montgomery. 

Georgia. 

Talladega. 

Dale. 

Jefferson. 



Lee. 

Jefferson. 

Lee. 

Barbour. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Chambers. 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Montgomery. 

Perry. 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Chambers. 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Louisiana. 

Barbour. 

Georgia. 

Lowndes. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Perry. 

Lee. 

Walker. 

Macon. 

Tallapoosa. 

Lee. 



* 



MM 



■M 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



l 9 



Hendley Varner Kell, 
Raphael Semmes Kell, ' . 
John Calvin Kimball, Jr., 
Thomas Dixson Lewis, 
Prank Allemong Lupton, 
Leonard LeBaron Lyons, 
William Audley Marshall, 
LeRoy Boyd McCrory, 
Isaac Isaiah Moses, . 
Glenn McCulloh, 
William Henry Oates, 
Richard Eugene Oden, . 
Charles Joseph Owen, 
Bryan Homer Powledge, 
Petit Reynolds, 
William Edwards Reynolds, 
Dawson Shannan, 
James McCord Skelton, 
Robert Clanton Smith, 
Joseph Hardie Spence, 
John McCullough Tharin, 
William Augusta's Thomas, 
Jordan Emmett Thomason, 
Layton Casey Tucker, 
Horace Turner, 
Daniel Van Antwerp, 
Garet Van Antwerp 
Clanton Ware Williams, 



Georgia^ 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Butler. 

Lee. 

Mobile. 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Mobile. 

Louisiana. 

Georgia. 
. Lee. 
. Macon. 

Macon. 

Lee. 
. Jackson. 

Chambers. 
• Talladega. 

Georgia. 
. Chambers. 
Randolph. 
. Lee. 

Mobile. 

Mobile. • 
Mobile. 
. Montgomery. 



— «, 



FOURTH CLASS, SECTION A. 



Archie Scruggs Averett, 
Elbert Cathey Averyt, 
Van Clifford Bailey, 
Charles Dun woody Bassett, 
William Wallace Bell, . 
Leigh Stafford Boyd, • 
Charles Allen Brown, 
Robert Bruce Broyles, 



Georgia. 

Shelby. 

Marengo. 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Sumpter. 

Russell.- 



Ml 



20 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



William Oze Broyles, 
Jacob Thomas Bullen, 
William Plumer Burgett, 
Joseph Little Burr, . 
David Allston Connor, 
Amos Hill Cox, 
Henry Benning Crawfo/d, 
George William Dantzler, 
Stanmore Holstun Darden, • 
Henry Ticknor DeBardenleben, 
George Mayo DeReamer, 
Henry Farris Dobbin, 
Joseph Quinlan Do we, 
Alonzo Stanford Dudley, 
John Thomas Duncan, 
Morton Everett Duson, . 
Porter Campbell Flanagan, 
Charles McKendree Floyd, 
James Edward Gachet, 
Albert Edward Gilbert, • 
Raleigh Frederick Hare. 
Paul Willis Harrison, 
Samuel Pope Calaway Hatchett, 
Walter Crafts Hazard, 
Joseph Andrew Holifield, 
Arthur William Holstun, 
James Shep Hunt, • < 

Clifton Arthur Jones, 
Harvey Ellis Jones, 
Byrd Beauregard Jordan, • 
Benjamin Walter McCutchen, 
Duncan McDougald, . 
Alfred Huger Moses, Jr., 
Louie Sinclair Mumford, 
Leonida3 Warren Payne, . " 
Frank Peabody, ... 
Wjjter Evan Richards, 
Harry .Stevens Chase Roberts, • 



Russell. 
Montgomery. 
Mobile. 
Georgia. 
South Carolina. 
Lee. 
Georgia. 
Lowndes. 
Chambers. 
Jefferson. 
Florida. 
Florida. 
Montgomery. 
Lee, 

Georgia. 
Louisiana. 
Lee. 

Chambers. 
Lee. 
Clay. 
Lee. 

Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Calhoun. 
Lee. 

Tallapoosa. 
Jackson. 
Lee. 
Mobile. 
Russell. 
Lee. 

Georgia. 
Lauderdale, 
Perry. 
L<ee. 

Georgia. 
Chambers. 
Georgia. 



B 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



21 



Richard Louis Samford, 
Brittain Hunter Saunders, 
Forest Bedford Sledge, • 
John Joseph Street, 
Archie Emmet Thomas, 
Sheldon Lyne Toomer, • 
James Arthur Tucker, 
David Marshal Walker, . 
Martin DeWitt Waters, 
Thaddeus Clement Watts, 
Alfred Anderson Wellborn, 
Richard Werner, 
David Lewis Whetstone, 
Richard Law Williams, 
Thomas Felton Wimberly, 
George De Kalb Winston, 
Porter Joshua Woodall, 
George Alfonzo Wright, • 



> . 



Lee. 

Lee. 

Sumter. 

Tallapoosa. 

Coosa, 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Marengo. 

Georgia. 

Montgomery. 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Elmore. 

Jefferson. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

St.. Clair. 

Lee. 



FOURTH CLASS, SECTION B. 



Robert Clarence Alexander, 
Henry Augustus Andrews, 
Richard Dejane Andrews, • 
William Becker, 
Posey Party Brooks, 
James Harris Burns, 
Harrison Keeler Deale, 
David S. Flanagan, 
Thomas Porter Flanagan, 
John David Foster, 
Crosland Clarence Hare, 
Joseph Andrew Herron, 
Cassey Rex Hudson, 
Julius Cicero Hudson, 
William Coates Hurt, 
William Driskell Kelley, 
Young Jackson, 
Frank McLemore Moseley, 



Autauga. 

Hale. 

Hale. 

Lee. 

Escambia. 

Dallas. 

Mobile. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Montgomery. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Macon. 

Dallas. 

Elmore. 

Montgomery. 



^ 



22 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



Charles Carter Newman, 
William Collier Slaughter, 
Albert Ellington Thornton, 
Charles Lee Worrell, 



Lee. 

Madison. 
Georgia. 
Macon. 



summary. 



Graduate?, 

First Class, 

Seoond Class, . 

Third Claas, 

Fourth Class, Section A, 

Fourth Class, Section B, 

Total, 



7 

24 
36 
57 
64 
22 



209 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN BACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 



English, 
History, 
French, 



Mental Science, 
Polities*! Economy, 
Mathematics 
Chemistry, 



180 Agriculture, . . .104 
113 Physics, ... 84 

42 Natural History & j&eology, 106 

45 Physiology, . . -34 

59 Engineering, ■ • 24 

10 Drawing, . .137 

19 Mechanic Arts, • . 121 

181 Military Tactics, . . 190 
92 



H| 



Military Organization 

1888-'89. 



r 



B. H. CRENSHAW. 



President. 
Wm. LeROY BROUN. 

Commandant. 
J. B. MCDONALD, Lieut. 10th TJ. S. Cavalry. 

Surgeon. 
J. H. DRAKE, M. D. 

Cadet Captaim. 
H. M. TAYLOR. T. M. WATLINGTON. 



Cadet 1st Lieut, and Adjutant. 
P. T. VAUGHAN, Jr. 

Cadet 1st Lieutenants. 

H. G. CROWDER, 

F. H. VERNON. 

E. J.SPRATLING, ( 

A. M. LLOYD, 

A.C.CROWDER, 

A. J. BURR. 

Cadet Sergeant- Major. 
T. C. THORINGTON. 



Cadet 1st Lieut, and Quartermaster, 
JOHN R. CLOWER. 

Cadet 2d Lieutenants. 

T. A. ROSS, 

A.St. C. DUNSTAN, 

H. S. DOSTER. 



Cadet Q. M. Sergeant. 
R. E. NOBLE. 



F. D. MILSTEAD. 

Cadet Sergeants. 

F.M.FONTAINE, 
W CALLOWAY, 
G. H. WARING, Jr., 
G. W. EMORY, 
D. GILLIS, 
J. W. BIVINS, 
J.F.WILKINSON, 
W. C WEISINGER, 
W. G. COOK, 
G. S CLARK, 
P. W. TERRY, 
R. H. POOLE. 



Cadet Color Sergeant. 
W. G. HARRISON. 

Cadet 1st Sergeants. 
B.C. ABERNETHY. 



Cadet Color Corporals. 

J. M. THARIN, 
J. H.SPENCE, 
W. H. OATES, 
D. HALL, 
C. B. GLENN. 



JOHN MILTON, Jr. 

Cadet Corporals. 

L. E. BAKER, 

J. N. DEAN, 

H. V. KELL, 

F. A.LUPTON, 

R.C.SMITH, 

W. A. MARSSHALL, 

C. N. HUGHES, 

C. L. HARE, 

B. F. HARWOOD, 

R. S, KELL, 

F. J. BIVINS, 

T D. LEWIS. 



24 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admisssion must be of erood moral charac- 
ter. To enter the fourth class the applicant must be not 
less than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified to pass 
a satisfactory examination in the following subjects : 

1. Geography and History of the United States. 

2. English— (a) An examination upon sentences contain- 
ing incorrect English, (b) A composition giving evidence 
of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, grammar 
and division into paragraphs. 

3. Mathematics— (a) Arithmetic, including fundamental 
operations; common and decimal fractions; denominate 
numbers, the metric system ; percentage, including interest 
and discount ; proportion ; extraction of square and cube 
roots ; (b) Algebra, to quadratic equations. 

Those applicants who desire to continue the study of Latin 
in the Fourth class, should be qualified to pass a satisfactory 
examination in Latin grammar and the first books of Caesar, 
in addition to the above subjects. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should be 
prepared to stand a satisfactory examination on all the 
studies of the lower classes, as shown in the courses of study. 
Where opportunity has not been offered to pursue special 
studies required at this College, the system of equivalents 
will be adopted, and studies which denote an equivalent 
amount of discipline and training will be accepted as satis- 
factoyr. V 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS: 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday the 
11th of September, the day on which the session opens. 
Candidates will also be examined during the session, when 
application is made for admission. x 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 
examinations for full admission to the fourth class, includ- 
ing those of fourteen years of age, are admitted to the sub- 
college department, which includes the fourth class, Sec. B. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



25 



They will be advanced to full admission to the fourth 
class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily the requir- 
ed examinations. 

Students upon their arrival at* Auburn will report immediately to the 
President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any class pre' 
vlous to matriculation. 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen 
recitations per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the 
exercises in laboratory work, drawing and military drill. 
These additional exercises occupy not less than twelve hours 
per week, and in all give twenty-seven exercises per week 
required. ' 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Students who are qualified to prosecute the studies of the 
second class, and those oyer twenty-one years of age who are 
not candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, with the 
advice of the Faculty, the subjects of study they may prefer 
and for which they may be qualified ; all other students will 
be assigned to one of the regular prescribed courses of study, 
unless otherwise ordered by the Faculty. Regular students 
who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations in any one 
study become special students. 

They will be classed as regular students pursuing a course 
for a degree, whenever they can pass the examinations in 
those subjects in which they were found deficient. 

Students who are not in full standing in all the prescribed 
studies of a class, rank in the military department with 
that class in which they have the greater number of studies, 
and their names are so placed in the catalogue. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and 
Natural Sciences with their applications ; Agriculture, Me- 
chanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Engineering, Drawing, 
English, French, German and Latin Languages, History, 
Political Economy, Mental and Moral Sciences. 



«o 



\ 



26 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to offer 
a liberal and practical education as a preparation for the 
active pursuits of life. 

There are three Degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and 
requiring four years for its completion : 

I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 

II. Course in Mechanics and Engineering. 

III. General Course. 

There are also two partial courses, each requiring two 
years for its completion : - 

IV. Two Ye\rs' Course in Agriculture. 

V. Two Years' Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I. includes theoretical and practical instruction in 
those branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and 
is especially adapted to those who propose to devote them- 
selves to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II. includes the principles and>applications of the 
sciences that directly relate to civil and mechanical engi- 
neering, and is adapted t) those who expect to enter the 
profession of engineering. 

Course III. has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language to 
meet the wants of those students who have selected no defi- 
nite vocation in life, as well as of those who propose ulti- 
mately to engage in teaching, or in some commercial or 
manufacturing business. 

Courses IV. and V. have been arranged for the benefit of 
those students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, 
are unable to continue at college lour years and take one of 
the regular degree courses. 

Students who complete either of these two year courses 
will, on passing a satisfactory examination, -receive certifi- 
cates indicating their attainments. 

Those who have completed the general course in each 
department of the school of Mechanic Ar?s, and are qualified, 
can enter upon a more extended technical course in Me- 
chanical Engineering. 



/ 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 2*] 

PREPARATORY COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

Students who expect to become practical pharmacists can 
enter upon a special course of Chemistry and Natural His- 
tory and occupy all their time in the laboratories of these 
departments, under the immediate direction of the professors. 
With the excellent facilities offered in the new chemical 
laboratory, scientific preparation of great value to the practi- 
cal pharmacist can be obtained. 

COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

Students who have received the degree of B. Sc. in En- 
gineering, or who have prosecuted an equivalent course of 
study, can enter upon a special course of Mining Engineer- 
ing, which includes the following subjects of study, and will 
require a residence of one year : 

Industrial Chemistry— Assaying, Reduction of Ores, Min- 
eralogy, Economic Geology, Mining Machinery, Drifting, 
Tunneling, Timbering, Ore Dressing, and the various opera- 
tions connected with the exploitation of mines. 

This course of study will be under the charge of the Pro- 
fessors of Chemistry, Engineering and Natural History. « 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature in 
the courses of education provided for the students of this 
College, and as far as possible all students are required to 
enter upon laboratory work in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work, are given in 
the following departments : 
I — Chemistry. 
II— Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, Etc. 

Ill— Agriculture . 
IV— Natural History. 
V— Technical Drawing. 
VI — Mechanic Arts. 



28 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



I.— COUKSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FOURTH CLASS. 



First Term, 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. + 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y* 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term, 



Third Term. 



5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 6. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physiology2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

fl. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. ft. Military Drill. 



• • 



First Term, 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'ry. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 



THIED CLASS. 

Second Term, 

3. English. 

2, History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'ry. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 

SECOND CLASS. 



Third Term. 

2. English. 

3. Botany, (a). 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art* Lab'ry. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term, 



3. English. 3. 

3. Physics. 3, 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. 
2. Agriculture. 2. 

4. Natural History (lab'y ).4. 

1. Military Tactics. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 

3. Military D rill. 3. 

(a) Begins March 1st. 



Second Term, 

English. 3, 

Physics. 3. 

Industrial Chemistry. 3. 
Agriculture. 2. 

Natural History (lab'y).4. 
Military Tactics. 1. 

Chemical Laboratory. 9. 
Practical Agriculture. 2. 
Military DrilL 3. 



Third Term. 

English. 

Physics. 

Industrial Chemistry. 

Agriculture. 

Natural History (lab'y). 

Military Tactics. 

Chemical Laboratory. 

Practical Agriculture. 

Military Drill. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



2 9 



First Term. 

2. English Literature. 2. 

2. Mental Science. 2. 

2. Physics. 2. 

4. Natural History. 4. 

2. Agriculture. 2. 
2. Agricultural Chemistry2. 

1. Military Science. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 



FIRST CLASS. 

Second Term. 

Political Economy. 2. 
Moral Science. 2. 

Astronomy. 2. 

Natural History. 4. 

Agriculture. 2. 

Agricultural Chemistry2. 
Military Science. 1. 

Chemical Laboratory. 9. 
Practical Agriculture. 2. 



Third Term. 

Political Economy. 
Moral Science. 
Astronomy. 
Natural History. 
Agriculture. 

Agricultural Chemistry. 
Military Science. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Practical Agriculture. 



II.— COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 



FOURTH CLASS. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. El. Physiology. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

THIRD CLASS. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 3. 

2. History. 2. 

5. Mathematics. 5. 

3. General Chemistry. 3. 
3. Agriculture (a). 3. 
3. Drawing. 3. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 



Second Term. 

English. 

History. 

Mathematics. 

General Chemistry. 

Agriculture (a). 

Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y* 

Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

2. English. 

3. Botany. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture (a). 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



(a) For Agriculture may he substituted French or work in the Chemical Laboratory. 




30 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, 



SECOND CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English or French. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 

4. Lab'y, Mineralogy. 

4. Field Work, Engin'g. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 

3. English or French. 

3. Physics. , 
5. Mathematics. 

5. Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Militarv Tactics. 

4. Lab'y, Mineralogy. 
4. Field Work, Engin'g. 
3. Militarv Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English or French. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Field Work, Engin'g. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 



FIRST CLASS. 



Second Term. 



Third Term. 



2. English Literature (b).2. Political Economy (b).2. Political Economy (b) 
2. Physics. 2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 



2. Natural History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 



2. Natural History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 



2. Natural History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 



Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. 



(b) For Eng. Lit. and Pol. Econ. may be substituted French or German. 

Ill— GENERAL COURSE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FOURTH CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term* 

3. English. 

2. History. 

4. Latin. 

6. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 

6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

i 

THIRD CLASS. 



31 



First Term. 

5. Latin. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. Latin. 

2. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (a). 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1, Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



Second Term. 

5. Latin. 

2. History. t 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. Latin. 

2. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (a). 

3. Military Drill. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Moral Science. 

2. Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



Third Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. Botany. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. Latin. 

2. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (a). 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Moral Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



(a) The student may elect the Laboratory of Chemistry, Natural History or Meohanio Arts. 



! 






32 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

IV.— TWO YEARS' COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 



First Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 



3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physiology2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



3. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 



3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y* 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

V.— TWO YEARS' COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2, History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 5. 

2. History. 2. 
5. Mathematics. 6. 

3. Elementary Physiology2. 

3. Drawing. 3. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 
2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 



Third Term. 

English. 

Historv. 

Mathematics. 

Agriculture. 

Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

Military Drill. 

Practical Agriculture. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 8. General Chemistry. 

5. Agriculture. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 
3. Enriish. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
5. Agriculture. 5. Agriculture. 

12. Practical Agriculture.12. Practical Agriculture.12. Practical Agriculture 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 




DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

PRESIDENT BROUN. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text-books 
and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The first part of 
the course is occupied with Elementary Rational Mechanics, 
treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of Molecular Mechan- 
ics ; while due prominence is given to principles, frequent 
reference is made to the applications of science. 

The studies of the second class include the properties of 
matter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kinematics, 
kinetics, mechanic powers, friction, pendulum, molecular 
forces of solids, liquids and gases, theory of undulations, 
heat, electricity, magnetism, etc. 

The studies of the first class include Electricity and its 
applications ; Optics, Astronomy and Meteorology. 

Text- Books.— In Physics, Atkinson's Ganot. In Astronomy, White 
and Young. 

MATHEMATICS. 

* PROF. SMITH. 

The general course for the first two years embraces the first 
yeafr, Algebra and Geometry, six books ; second year, Solid 
Geometry, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Surveying,' 

Mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained : First, mental dis- 
cipline. Second, a thorough knowledge of the principles of 
pure mathematics and their practical applications. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given in the third 
class in farm, town and government land surveying, divid- 
ing land, mapping, plotting and computing of areas, etc. ; 
also in the theory, adjustment and use of instruments. 
3 



-i 



34 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to held 

practice. 

Mensuration includes an extended course in measure- 
ments of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and curvi- 
linear figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students 
lays the foundation for the pure and applied Mathematics of 
the Mechanical and Engineering course. Analytical Geom- 
etry, Descriptive Geometry and Calculus are pursued in the 
Engineering course. Especial attention is given to their 

practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is sup- 
plemented by lectures. Solutions of original practical prob- 
lems are required of the student, to make him familiar with 
the application of principles and formulae. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Schuyler's Surveying, 
Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, Waldo's Descriptive Geometry, Tay- 
lor's Calculus, Olney's and Wentworth's Trigonometry. 

NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. 



PROF. MELL. 

Geology.— This subject is studied in the senior class, and 
extends through the entire session. Special attention is 
given to the geology of Alabama, and many illustrations are 
drawn from the coal and iron fields, and other natural de- 
posits of mineral in the State. The origin of ore deposits, 
mineral springs, and geological relations of soils are carefully 

studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical Geol- 
ogy for the post-graduate students. This subject is pursued 
by applicants for degrees of Master of Science and Mining 
Engineering. 

The second class in Engineering spend two terms in Min- 
eralogy and blow-pipe work. 

Botany.— The students of the third class begin the study 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



35 



of Botany the first of March and continue it through the 
session. Analytical work is made an important feature. 
This class is provided with plants from the neighboring 
fields, and taught how to determine their specific names. 
The work is sufficiently exhaustive to enable the student, 
after completing the course, to name any of the ordinary 
weeds and grasses that he will encounter in this section. 
All students of the third class are required to study Botany. 
In the second class, in the course of Chemistry and Agri- 
culture, an amount of time is devoted to systematic and 
structural Botany, and to advanced laboratory work with 
the microscope in the preparation of specimens showing 
plant structure ; this work is not only sufficient to familiar- 
ize the students with the methods of plant building and 
cellular organization, but also to practise them in detecting 
the various forms of fungi that are injurious to fruits and 
vegetables. Excellent microscopes of the most, improved 
patterns, and all the necessary chemicals and apparatus for 
preparing and mounting vegetable tissues, are used by the 
students. A dark room is attached to this laboratory for 
micro-photographic work. 

TEXT- BOOKS. 

Le Conte's Geology, Bessey's Botany, Apgar's Plant Analysis, Gray's 
Botany, Plant Dissection (Arthur, Barns and Coulter.) 

ALABAMA WEATHER SERVICE. 

The United States Signal Service has established in Ala- 
bama a State system for collecting meteorological data relat- 
ing to climatic changes. The service is now in successful 
operation with the central office located at this Institute. 
Bulletins are issued at the close of each month, compiled 
from reports sent the Director from numerous stations scat- 
tered thoughout the State. An opportunity is thus offered 
the students in Meteorology of becoming familiar with the 
system so long successfully operated by tbe Department at 
Washington. 



36 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 



V 



PROFESSOR LANE. 
CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies of this department begin in the sec 
ond class, and require a good knowledge of Algebra, Geom- 
etry, Trigonometry and Analytical Mechanics. They are 

as follows : 

Second Class.— Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic 
curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting 
slope stakes, location and construction of common roads 
and railroads. 

First Class.— -Classification, appearances, defects, seasoning, 
durability and preservation of timber ; classification and 
description of natural building stones ; bricks and concretes ; 
cast and wrought iron, steel and other metals; limes^ 
cements, mortars and their manufacture ; paints and other 
preservatives ; classification of strains and a general mathe- 
matical discussion of the same ; joints and fastenings ; solid 
and open built beams; classification, construction and 
mechanics of masonry ; foundations on land and in water ; 
bridges and roofs of different kinds ; their construction and 
strains determined mathematically and graphically ; com- 
mon roads, their coverings, location and construction ; loca- 
tion and construction of railroads; navigable, irrigation and 
drainage canals ; river and sea-coast improvements. Theory 
and practice are combined in both classes. 



TEXT-BOOKS. 

Second Class.— Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers, Gillespie's 
Roads and Railroads, Parson's Track. 
, First Class, — Wheeler's Civil Engineering, Von Ott's Graphic Statics. 

DRAWING. 

All of the students of the third and fourth classes are 
required to take Drawing; but only the students in Mechan- 
ics and Engineeringin the first and second classes. 

The fourth class is taught linear and free-hand drawing. 




AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 37 

The third class is instructed in the principles of orthograph- 
ic and isometric projections, shades and shadows, practical 
perspective and tinting. In the second class the instruction 
embraces a more extended course in orthographic and 
isometric drawing, perspective, shades and shadows and 
tinting; also sketches of tools and machines, plana, eleva- 
tions and cross-sections of buildings and blue prints. The 
first class makes topographical drawings, and drawings of 
machines, roofs, bridges, etc., to different scales and blue 
prints. Plans, profiles and sections of railroad surveys 
complete the instruction in this department. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Fourth Class.-Thorne's Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and 

Davidson's Model Drawing. 

Third Class.— Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical Perspec- 
tive, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Second Class.-Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson'* Draw- 
ing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the College, 
Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. , jL 

First Class.-French, English and American Plates belonging to the 

College, Keuffell & Esser's Alphabet. 

AGRICULTURE. 



PROF. NEWMAN. 

The course of instruction in this department embraces, I. 
soils • II. plants ; III, domestic animals. In thefourth class 
twenty lectures, covering the third term of the session, treat 
of soils, their classification, physical defects and remedies, 
causes of diminished fertility, and the means used to pro- 
tect them from waste and restore fertility, the theory and 
practice of surface and sub-drainage, etc. The subject is 
treated with special reference to the different classes of soil 
in Alabama, omitting as far as possible questions involving 
a knowledge of Chemistry and Botany-subjects not taught 

in the fourth class. 

In the third class, in addition to the discussion of the 
physical properties and mechanical treatment of soils, the 
methods of studying their chemical defects and their reme- 



f 



38 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



dies are discussed. The sources 'of the important elements 
of plant food, and their use upon different soils 'and plants, 
the restoration of humus, saving home manures, composts, 
commercial fertilizers, ^the office of different chemical 
elements in plant development— the relations of plant 
growth to soil andjatmosphere, (the theory and practice of 
restoration of crops, terracing and grading to prevent wash- 
ing, plows and plowing — indeed everything connected with 
tilling the soil passes under review as foundation work. 

Southern agriculture is then treated in the concrete — the 
history, nature and cultivation of each of our field crops 
discussed as regards their adaptation to and treatment upon 
the soils of Alabama. This occupies the first and second 
terms. The third term is devoted to domestic and com- 
mercial horticulture, poultry, sheep, cattle-breeding and 
management of the dairy, etc. In the second class stock- 
breeding and management is completed, and a thorough 
course in pomology, including the propagation of nursery 
stock, planting, manuring, pruning, cultivating, harvesting 
and marketing every species of fruit, treated theoretically 
and practically, occupies the remainder of the session. 
Barry's Fruit Garden, corrected for our latitude, is used in 
this class. In the senior class a series of lectures is deliv- 
ered upon political economy in its special relations to the 
pursuit of agriculture, and the relations of capital and labor 
devoted ta agriculture ; the selection, purchase, equipment 
and management of a farm, the ratio between fixed and 
working capital, the employment and management of labor, 
etc., etc. The science of cattle feeding occupies the second 
term, and landscape gardening, treated with special refer- 
ence to the improvement of country homes, occupies the 
remainder of the session. 

CHEMISTRY. 



PROF. LUPTON. ASSISTANT, L. W. WILKINSON. 

Instruction in this department embraces— 
1. A course of lectures in General Chemistry. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 39 

2. A course of lectures in Industrial Chemistry. 

3. A course of lectures in Agricultural Chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with each 
course of lectures, for the practice of chemical analysis and 
chemical research, 

1. Course in General Chemistry : -This consists of a series 
of lectures (three per week) extending throughout the en- 
tire session, and includes a discussion of the fundamental 
principles of Chemical Philosophy in connection with the 
history, preparation, properties and compounds of the me- 
tallic and non-metallic elements, with the main facts and 
principles of Organic Chemistry. In this course the more 
common applications of Chemistry to the Arts and Manu- 
factures are discussed. The apparatus used for experimental 
illustration is extensive, containing the newest and most 
approved instruments necessary for presenting the subject 
in the most attractive and instructive form. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cook's Chem- 
ical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. The lectures on Industrial Chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion in 
detail of the processes and chemical principles involved in 
the most important applications of Chemistry in the Arts 
and Manufactures to the reduction of ores, the preparation 
of materials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, heating, 
illumination, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suitable 
specimens of raw materials and manufacturing products, to- 
gether with models and diagrams. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Wagner's Chemical Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as applie d Jo 
Arts Ind Manufacturing, Ure>s Dictionary, Watt's Dictionary, Richard- 
son and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy. 

3 Course in Agricultural Chemistry : This consists of 
lectures on Chemistry in its applications to Agriculture 
(two per week) and includes a thorough discussion of the 



207874 



4° 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



* 



origin, composition and classification of soils, the composi- 
tion and growth of plants, the sources of plant food and how 
obtained, the improvement of soils, the manufacture and 
use of fertilizers, the chemical principles involved in the ro- 
tation of crops, the feeding of live stock and the various op- 
erations carried on by the intelligent and successful agricul- 



turist. 



BOOKS OF REFERENCE. 



Lupton's Elementary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson 
and Cameron's Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agricul- 
ture in relation with Chemistry, Scientific Journals, Reports of the Uni- 
ted States Department of Agriculture, and the bulletins and reports 
of the various home and foreign Agricultural Departments and Sta- 
tions. 

4. The Course of Systematic Laboratory Work : This 
course of practical work in the Laboratory is carried on in 
connection with each course of lectures, and embraces the 
practical operation of chemical analysis and synthesis, be- 
ing varied somewhat to suit the individual object of the stu- 
dent. 

The Laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
during six days in the week, are amply supplied with every- 
thing necessary for instruction in chemical manipulation, 
in the qualitative ahd quantitative analysis of soils, fertili- 
zers, minerals, mineral waters, technical products, etc., and 
in the method of prosecuting chemical researches. Unusual 
facilities are offered to students who wish to devote their 
time to the special study of practical chemistry. 

Each student on entering the Chemical Laboratory is fur- 
nished with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles, and the 
common re-agents and apparatus used in qualitative and 
quantitative analysis. At the close of the session he will be 
credited with such articles as may be returned in good order ; 
the value of those which have been injured or destroyed will 
be deducted from the deposit. 

BOOKS USED. 

In Qualitative Analysis— Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In Quantitative Analysis— Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, Rickett's 
Notes on Assaying Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. 

In Agricultural Chemical Analysis-Church, Frankland. Official 
methods of the Association of Agricultural Chemists. 






AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



4 1 



CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

(For description of the building, see page n.) 

The Chemical Apparatus recently purchased for the new laboratory 
consists of a full supply of the latest and most approved instruments for 
practical work and investigation. The building is supplied with water 
and gas and every appliance required to meet the demands of modern 
scientific instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus usuallv 
supplied to first-class Laboratories, a new and improved Schmidt and 
Haensch's Polariscope has been imported, two short-arm Becker Bal- 
ances of latest pattern, Bunsen Spectroscope, Zeiss* Microscope, and 
other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 

ENGLISH AND LATIN. 



PROF. THACH. 



ENGLISH. 



In this department the students are carried through a sys- 
tematic course of study in the English Language and litera- 
ture. In the courses of study which do not include the 
ancient classics, a full course in English is especially im- 
portant. It is therefore designed, as much as the time 
allotted permits, to familiarize these students by frequent 
exercises with the standard authors of the language. 
The course of study is as follows : ' 

Fourth Class.— Five hours a week ; study of grammar, 
the principles of special and general composition, with fre- 
quent brief papers illustrating the laws studied. 

Whitney's Essentials, Lockwood's Lessons in Rhetoric. 

Third Class— Three hours a week ; study of style, analysis 
of selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on lit- 
erary and historic themes. 

Genung's Rhetoric, Scudder's American Poems, Abbott's How to 
Write Clearly. Weekly exercises in declamation are required of this 
class. 

Second Class— Three hours a week; critical study of 
English Classics, History of English and American Litera- 
ture, Logic, Essays. 






-*\ 



4 2 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

Shawns History of English Literature, Abbott's English Lessons, 
Hale's Longer English Poems. - 

First Class.- Two hours a week, first term. Principles of 
criticism and study of English Classics; second and third 
terms, Political Economy. Two hours a week, first and sec- 
ond terms, Mental Science; third term, Moral Science. 

Shakespeare's Plays, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Wayland's Science 
of Wealth, Hickok's Mental Science, Gregory's Christian Ethics. 

Three original orations are required during the year of each student 
in the first and second classes. 

LATIN. 

The subjects Uught in this department are the Latin 
Language and Literature. 

The modes of instruction are by translation from the Latin 
texts into English and from English into Latin. The con- 
stant use of black-boards adds much to the progress and ac- 
curacy of the student. 

A systematic course of exercises, illustrative of the princi- 
ples of Latin etymology and syntax, is carried on in con- 
nection with the reading of the authors prescribed. Special 
attention is given to English derivatives from the Latin, 
and to the corresponding idioms of the two languages. 

The progress of the student is valued not so much by the 
number of books read, as by his ability to read Latin and ex- 
plain the principles of interpretation and construction. 

Latin authors read : 

Fourth Class.— Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Grammar and Composition. 

Third Class.— Cicero, Composition. 

Second Class.— Tacitus, Horace, Selections from Latin poets and 
Prose writers, Classical Literature. 
First Class.— Cicero's Tusculan Disputations, Terence, History of 

Latin Literature. 



y 



PL/N Of 



OF 



MECHANIC ARTS 

ALA. POLY. INST. 

SCALE $fc*X' 



\^ 



INDEX 



A 


WORKBENCHES 


R 





BAND SAW 


5 


C 


SCROLL. SAW 


T 





PATTERN LATHS 


U 


E 


CIRCULAR SAW 


/ v 


P 


grindstone 


w 


G 


0«/zr-PLAf/CR 


X 


H 


SURFACE »♦ 


Y 


J 


Dfl/LL PRESS 


z 


K 


E7LING BENCHES 


a 


L 


ENGINE LATHES 


1 


M 


BENCH GRINDER 


c 


N 


TOOL w 


d 





POST DRILL 


6 


P 


SHAPEP 


* 


a 


PLANER 







h. SHAFT L//VE8 




/c BENCH LS 



SPEE0 LATH* 

MILLING MACHINE 
ENGINE 
DYNAMO 
MOULDING BENCHES 

CUPOLA 

BRASS FURNACE 

FORGES 

ANVILS 

WOOD LATHES 

BLOWERS 

HEATER 

PUMP 

BOILEH 

CLOSETS 

SINKS 





©c 




© ^ 


I 


0OILEI 


HOUSEA 


19 X 2t 


' M 










d> 






GOAL ' 




6 

* 


BIN 

i 




/ 



I 



U-u,"— 1-. 



|7a*J| 



C himnty 

€oH. 



WA1H 



rinoM 






- 















I 







T 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 43 

MECHANIC ART. 

G. H. BRYANT, B. S., INSTRUCTOR. 
J. J, WILMORE, B. A. BLAKEY, ASSISTANTS. 

The course in Manual Training covers three years, as fol- 
lpws: First year, wood-working— carpentry and turning; 
second year, pattern-making and foundry and forge work- 
moulding, casting and smithing; third year, machine shop 
— chipping and filing and machine work in metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the three 
lower classes (5th, 4th and 3d). For satisfactory reasons a 
student may be excused from this laboratory work by the 

Faculty. 
The full work of each class is six hours per *eek, in three 

exercises of two hours each. 

. The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 
from a twenty-five horse power Harris-Corliss automatic engine, which 
is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel horizontal tubular 
boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the feed water form a part of 
the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial brick boiler- 
house and chimney have been erected. 

The equipment for the wood- working shop comprises the following: 
20 double wood-working benches, each with complete set of carpenter's 
tools; 20 turning-laths, 10-inch swing, each with complete set of tools; 
1 double circular saw; 1 band saw; 1 board-planing machine; 1 buzz 
planer; 2 scroll saws (power); 1 large pattern- maker's lathe, i6inch 
swing; 1 36-inch grindstone. In addition to these, the tool-room is sup- 
plied with a variety of extra hand-tools for special work. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of moulding-benches for 12 
students, each supplied with a complete set of moulder's tools; a 14-inch 
cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of melting 1,000 pounds 
of iron per hour; a tfrass furnace in which can be melted 100 pounds of 
brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, etc. Also a full supply of 
ladles, large and small moulding flasks, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 12 hand-forges of new pattern, 
each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast for all the forges 
is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower (which also 
furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No. 15 Sturtevant exhaust 
blower draws the smoke from the fires into the smoke-flues and forces it 
out through the chimney. 




I : 




44 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

The machine tools in the machine department are as follows: 6 en- 
gine-lathes (screw-cutting) 14-inch swing, 6-foot bed; 2 engine-lathes 16- 
inch swing (one with taper attachment); 1 speed lathe, 10-inch swing; 1 
20-inch drill-press (power feed); 1 15-inch shaper; 1 22-inch x 22-inch x 
5-foot friction planer; 1 universal milling machine; 1 corundum tool- 
grinder (14-inch wheel); 1 bench grinding -machine (small); 1 post drill 
press (14 inch). A part of this room is set apart for vise- work — chipping 
and filing — and benches for 12 students are provided, each with vise and 
sets of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool-room is to be found a 
good supply of machinists' tools for general shop use, such as lathe and 
drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, files, cutting and measur- 
ing tools, and special appliances for machine work, etc. 

The nature of the work in each department is as follows : 

1st year. 

I. A course of carpentry (hand work covering the first 
term and part of the second, or about five months.) 

The lessons include instruction on the nature and use 
of tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary 
work with plane, saw, chisel, etc., different kinds of joints— ' 
timber-splices, cross joints, mortice and tenon, mitre and 
frame work, dovetail work comprising different kinds of 
joints used in cabinet making, light cabinet work, examples 
in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning extending through the three 
months of the third term. The lessons comprise, first, na- 
ture and use of lathe and tools, plain straight turning, cal- 
iper work to different diameters and lengths, simple and 
compound curves, screw-plate and chuck-work, hollow and 
spherical turning. 

2d year. 

LA course in pattern-making, covering the first half of 
the first term. The work includes a variety of examples of 
whole and split patterns, core work, etc., giving the students 
familiarity with the use of patterns for general moulding. 

11. A course in moulding and casting in iron and brass oc- 
cupying ten weeks. The work consists for the most part of 

r,M f C ^ SUCh aS Hght machine P arts > b »t a sufficient 
vanety of forms are introduced for the student to acquire a 
good general and practical knowledge of the usual methods 



__ 







AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 45 

and appliances used in light foundry work. Most of the 
work is in green sand in two-part flasks ; core work is also 
given, and some three-part flask and some dry sand work 
is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made by 
students are used, besides special patterns for occasional 
larger or more complicated wor^. Instruction and practice 
is given in working the cupola, each student in turn taking 
charge of a melting. 

III. A course in forge work in iron and steel occupying 
the remainder of the year. The lessons are arranged so that 
the students, in making the series of objects, become familiar 
with the nature of the metals and the successive steps in 
working them by hand into simple and complex forms, as 
drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, welding by 
various methods, tool-forging, tempering, hardening, etc. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lect- 
ures is given on the metallurgy and working of the metals 
used in the industrial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, 
brass, etc. 

3d year. 

I. A course in chipping and filing covering the first term. 
The lessons comprise work on cast and wrought iron : Chip- 
ping to line on flat and curved surfaces, key-seating, etc.; 
filing and finishing to line (straight and curved), surface fil- 
ing and finishing, fitting, slotting, dovetail work, sliding and 
tight fits, sawing, pin, screw and key filing, surface finish- 
ing with scraper, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the year. 
The work includes cast and wrought iron, steel and brass : 
Turning to various diameters and lengths, taper turning, 
facing with chuck and face plate, drilling— both in lathe and 
drill press— reaming, boring, screw cutting in lathe and with 
taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc, with planer and shaper, 
milling various forms with the milling machine, fitting, 
grinding, polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various sub- 
jects connected with machine work in metals: Such as forms,.. 



46 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

construction and use of the various machines, cutting tools, 
gearing, gauges, screw threads, etc. During the last term 
some piece of construction work is given the classes. 

Instruction is generally given, first, by black-board draw- 
ings or sketches which the student copies, with dimensions 
in note-book, with which each one provides himself; thus 
each one works from his own notes. This is supplemented, 
whenever necessary, by the actual construction of the lesson 
by the instructor before the class; second by inspection and 
direction at the bench by the instructor, 

Students desiring to pursue the study of applied mechan- 
ics beyond the above course will take a special course of 
Steam and Mill Engineering, supplemented by experiment 
and practice with the apparatus, including steam generation 
and the forms, construction and use of steam-boilers and ac- 
companying apparatus ; steam as a motive power^ and forms, 
construction and use of the steam engine, with the study 
and use of the indicator; transmission of power— shafting, 
belting, gearing, etc.; also elementary theoretical mechan- 
ism. 

MODERN LANGUAGES AND HISTORY. 

GEORGE PETRIE, ADJUNCT PROFESSOR. 
MODERN LANGUAGES. 

The following regular courses are given in French and 
German : 

French.— First year: Three recitations a week. During 
this year the principal object is to acquire facility in reading 
ordinary French at sight ; and to this end, the student starts 
reading at an early stage and is practiced continually in sight 
reading and in previously assigned selections. 

Second year : Three recitations a week. During this year 
more difficult and^arifyl French is read, and careful instruc- 
tion is given upon the laws of grammar and the construc- 
tion of the language, while the principles thus learned are 
illustrated and impressed by frequent exercises in rendering 
English into French. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



47 



German. — Two years : Two recitations a week the first year, 
three a week the second year. In this course the aim and 
the methods are similar to those in the French. 

Special Courses. — In addition to these regular courses, ad- 
ditional classes are formed for special study of the literature, 
or for special study in any particular direction desired, when 
the number of students desiring it is sufficient. 

HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much to memorize 
facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is laid on the 
fact that History is not a succession of isolated facts, but a 
progressive whole, each event being at once the cause and 
the effect of other events. This causal relation of events is 
closely studied and the students are taught to investigate 
for themselves the growth of ideas, and to trace particularly 
their development in the United States, so as to acquire a 
practical knowledge of the history and present working of 
our government and institutions. The knowledge acquired 
is rendered clear and permanent by frequent comparisons of 
customs and laws, and also by diagrams, charts and maps. 
Instruction is given by lectures and text-books, while in- 
vestigation is stimulated by requiring essays and by holding 
frequent discussions in the class-room. 

The course covers one year and a part of the next, and 
embraces the history of the United States, studies on our 
government and its institutions and on general history. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 



LIEUT. J. B. MCDONALD, U. S. ARMY, COMMANDANT. 

Military Science and Tactics are required to be taught in 
this institution by law. This law is faithfully carried out 
by imparting to each student, not physically incapacitated 
to bear arms, practical instruction in the School of the 
Soldier, of the Company and of the Battalion ; also in Guard 
Mountings, Inspections, Dress Parades, Reviews, etc. 



4 8 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

Under Section 1225 U. S. Revised Statutes, the College is 

unaer oecuuu " accoutrements and 

provided with modern Cadet rifles and ac 5 0Ul 
two pieces of field artillery. Ammunition for practice firing 
L used under the direction of an experienced officer 

?he foSowing uniform of standard Cadet gray cloth has 
Jn prtSedfor dress, via : Coats and pants as worn at 
West Point, with sack coat for fatigue, dark blue Cadet cap. 

f very neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained here 
at $18. This is less expensive than the *ual clothing 
111 students are required to wear this uniform during the 

8e The n drills are short and the military duty involves no 
hardships. The military drill is a health-giving exercise 
and its good effects in the development of the phynque and 
improvement of the carriage of the Cadet are manifest. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
The officers are selected for proficiency in drill, deportment 
and studies. Each company is officered by one Captain, 
two 1st Lieutenants, one 2d Lieutenant, and with a proper 
number of Sergeants and Corporals. The officers and non- 
commissioned officers are distinguished by appropriate in- 
signia of rank. These appointments are conferred by the 
President on nomination of the Commandant. 

Privates of the first class may be excused by the Faculty 
from all military drill. 

The first and second classes recite once a week in Military 

Tactics. 

POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 

There are three Post-Graduate Degrees-MASTER OF SCIENCE, 
MINING ENGINEER and CIVIL ENGINEER. 

A Post-Graduate Degree may be obtained by a graduate 
of this College, or of any other institution of equal grade, by 
one year's residence at the CQllege, spent in the successful 
prosecution of a course of study in applied science prescribed 
by the Faculty. 

Candidates must also present to the Faculty a satisfactory 
thesis, showing independent investigation upon some subject 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



49 



pertaining to their course of study, and must pass a satis- 
factory examination on the course of study prescribed. The 
examination is written and oral in presence of the Faculty. 

Applicants for Post-Graduate Degree are by order of the 
Board, permitted to matriculate without payment of fees, 
except laboratory fees for those who work in the chemical 
laboratory. 

They are subject to the general regulations as other stu- 
dents, but exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates, who are not candidates for a degree, 
are permitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in 
any department of the College, except chemical laboratory, 
without payment of regular fees. 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions will be awarded in the different subjects of 
each class to those students whose grade for the entire year 
is above 90 per cent., and who have satisfactorily passed 
all the regular examinations of that session. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on Com- 
mencement day to those who obtain three Distinctions. 
For the first class four Distinctions are required. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are 
kept by the officers of instruction, in a form* adapted to per- 
manent preservation. 

From the record a monthly circular, or statement, is sent 
to the parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written recitations, or monthly examinations on the 
studies of the month, are held at the option of the professor. 

At the end of each term written or oral examinations, or 
both, are held on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the Fac- 
ulty, and in no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final 
4 



! 



I 



m 



~~» 



< 



50 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

examination, can be promoted to full standing to the next 
higher class only on satisfactory examinations at the open- 
ing of the next session. 

It is required that every student who enters the College 
shall remain through the examinations at the end of the 
term. Leaves of absence and honorable discharges will, 
therefore, not be granted within six weeks of the examina- 
tion, except in extreme cases. 

Examinations for degrees or certificates of proficiency em- 
brace the entire subject of study in the course. „ 



LIBRARY. 



V 



A temporary room is appropriated to the Library until 
the completion of the College building, but the number of 
books at present is not large. Additions are made annually. 

The Library is open at stated times, when students are 
permitted to select books according to regulations prescribed 
by the Faculty. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the 
President and Faculty in accordance with the code of laws 
and regulations enacted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study, and punctuality in attendance on 
recitations and all other duties, is required of every student. 

Students are not allowed to have in their possession weap- 
ons or arms not issued for the performance of military 
duty. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICE. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and 
also to attend the church of their choice at least once on 
Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes 
every Sunday. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 5 1 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized, and through its 
weekly meetings, exerts a wholesome Christian influence 
among the students of the College. 

The following students are the officers of the Association : 

G. S. Clark, President. | 

W. G. Harrison, Vice-President. 

J. F. Wilkinson, Recording Secretary. 

J. W. Bivins, Corresponding Secretary. 

H. M. Taylor, Treasurer. 

I 

LOCATION. I 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, sixty miles 
east of Montgomery, directly on the line of the Western 
Railroad. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general 
good health and entire freedom from malaria, having an ele- 
vation of eight hundred and twenty-one feet above tide-wa- 
ter. By statute of the State, the sale of spirituous liquors 
and keeping saloons of any kind are forbidden. 

THESIS. 

Each applicant for a reular degree is required to write and 
submit to the Faculty a thesis on a subject of immediate 
relation to some study of his course, and deliver the same at 
Commencement, if required by the Faculty. 

This thesis must be given to the professor of English by 
the first day of May. 

LITERARY SOCIETY. 

There are two Literary Societies — the Wirt and Webste- 
rian — connected with the College. 

These Societies hold celebrations on the evenings of 
Thanksgiving Day and the 22d of February, and also Com : 
mencement week. They elect annually, with the approval 
of the Faculty, an orator to represent them at the close of ^ 

the year. 



52 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel ser- 
vices, oratorical exercises in declamation and in original ora- 
tions are conducted by the Professor of English, in presence 
of the faculty and students. 

The first and second terms the students of the third class are 
exercised in declamation. 

The second term the members of the second class deliver 

original orations. 
The third wrm the members of the first class read essays or 

deliver original orations. 

c SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The Annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the Society, 
is delivered in the chapel during Commencement week. 
The following are the officers of the Society : ^ 

T. H. Frazer, M. D., President. 

J. C. Street, Vice-President. 

C. C. Thach, Treasurer and Secretary. 

The Alumni Oration will be delivered next Commence- 
ment by J. E. D. Shipp, of Georgia. 

BOARDING. 

The College has no barracks or dormitories, and the stu- 
dents board with the families of the town of Auburn, and 
thus enjoy all the protecting and beneficial influences of the 
family circle. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it is 
to report those who, without permission, leave their rooms 
after the "call to quarters," or are guilty of any violation of 
order. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not 
permitted to make changes without obtaining permission 
from the President. • • 

EXPENSES. 

Incidental fee, per half session $2 50 



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4 



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AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 53 

Library fee, per half session $1 00 

Surgeon's fee, per half session 2 50 

Board per month, with fuel and lights $12 to 14 00 

These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and $6.00 
on February 1st. By order of the Board no fees can be 
remitted. 

There is no charge for tuition. 

The surgeon is required to visit daily the cadets reported 
sick, and to give all requisite medical attendance without 
other charge than the regular surgeon's fee. 

By messing the cost of board has been reduced by a few 
students to $8.50 per month. For students entering after 
January 1st, the fees for half session only are required. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required, to be deposited 
by each student on matriculation, to cover any special or 
general damages to College property for which he may be 
liable. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent fee, 
or the unexpended balance, will be refunded to the student. 

AMOUNT OF DEPOSIT. 

Each student on entering College should deposit with the 
Treasurer not less than 850.00 to pay the expenses of fees, 
one month's board, uniform, books, etc. 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the 
Treasurer of the College all funds desired for sons or wards, 
whether for regular charges of College fees and board, or for 
any other purpose. It is the duty of this officer to keep 
safely all funds placed in his hands, and to pay all expenses 
incurred by the students, including board, uniform, books, 
etc., when approved. 

When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treas- 
urer of the College by the cadet to pay his necesssary ex- 



54 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



*^y 



penses. These checks are paid only when approved by the 
President. This approval is given only for necessary ex- 
penses, as stated in the catalogue, unless specially requested 
in writing by the parent. 

The attention of parents is called to the following law en- 
acted by the Trustees : 

When a student matriculates, all money required to p&y the College 
fees, and all other moneys in his possession, must be deposited with the 
Treasurer, unless the President shall receive special instruction from 
the parent or guardian to the contrary. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

The Academic Year commences on Wednesday, 11th Sep- 
tember, (second Wednesday after first Monday) and ends on 
the second Wednesday after the first Monday in June fol- 
lowing, 11th, which is Commencement day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the last week in Decem- 
ber ; the second term begins January 1st and ends March 
29th ; the third term continues from March 31st to the close 
of the session. 

RESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 

The following resolution was adopted by the Trustees: 

That in view of increased facilities for instruction in Agriculture and 
the technical departments of education now possessed by this College 
especially in the department of Mechanic Arts, made possible by the re- 
cent donation from the State, the Faculty are authorized, in addition to 
the legal name of this College, to print on the catalogue the words 
ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, as significant of the ex- 
panded system of practical instruction in industrial science in the course 
of education now provided for. 

DONATIONS TO MUSEUM. 

Valuable contributions have been made to the museum by the follow- 
ing persons : 

Mr. Albert Strassberger, of Montgomery, Alabama, a large collection 
of minerals, woods and manufactured products, representing the natural 
resources of Alabama. 

Messrs. Kaldenberg & Co., of New York, beautiful polished specimens 
of amber containing fossil insects, and a fine piece of ivory representing 
cross section of a tusk. 




AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 55 



Dr. Remus Persons, of the United States Navy, valuable collections 
of crystalized minerals from the neigborhood of Hot Springs, Arkansas, 
bitumen, infusorial earth and well preserved specimens of reptiles and 
other animals. 

Dr. Charles Mohr, of Mobile, Alabama, several hundred specimens of 
woods, representing a large number of species of Alabama growth. 

Mr. James Clayton, of Auburn, also a fine collection of Alabama 
woods. 

The Smithsonian Institute, ^25 species of the lower forms of inverte- 
brates prepared for class study. 

United States Department of Agriculture, a fine collection of well 
pressed and mounted grasses and other plants from different quarters of 
the United States. 

Mr. James Postell, of St. Simon's Island, Georgia, has donated to 
the museum his excellent collection of shells and fossils representing 
about 1,000 species. This collection has not yet been received, but it will 
be shipped as soon as the cases are ready to preserve the specimens. 

Small donations have been received from the following persons : 

Mr. J. H. Dunstan, of Virginia, gold ores and jasper from South 
America. 

Mr. W. D. Taylor, of Birmingham. 
Rev. P. C. Morton, of Tuskegee. 
Mr. Fontaine Broun, of West Virginia. 
Dr. George D. Norris, of New Market, Alabama. 
Mr. V. M. Fleming, of Virginia. 
Mr. Howard Lamar, of Atlanta, Georgia. 

A number of the students now in the institution have contributed 
specimens. 

DONATIONS TO LIBRARY. 

Secretary of the Interior, Census of 1880, Report of Chief of En- 
gineers, Coast and Geodetic Survey, Education, etc., 64 vols. 
Hon. Jno. T. Morgan, Public Document, 6 vols. 
Hon. James L. Pugh, Public Document, 8 vols. 
Hon. W. C. Oates, War of the Rebellion, Congressional Record, etc., 

8 vols. 

Hon. N. H. R. Dawson, Reports on Education, Pamphlets, etc., 9 vols. 



56 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



CALENDAR, 1889-90. 



Session begins Wednesday, Sept. u, 1889 

Examination for admission Wednesday, Sept. ft, 1889 

First term begins Wednesday, Sept. 11, 1889 

First term ends Saturday, Dec. 21, 1889 

Second term begins Wednesday, Jan. 1, 1890 

Second term ends Saturday, March 29, 1890 

Third term begins Monday, March 31, 1890 

Third class exercises Thursday, May 1, 1890- 

Final examinations begin Monday, May 19, 1890 

Commencement sermon Sunday, June 8, 1890 

Annual meeting of trustees Monday, June 9, 1890 

Celebration of Literary societies, 8 p. m '. Monday, June 9, 1890 

Second class celebration Tuesday, June 10, 1890 

Alumni oration Tuesday, June 10, 1890 

Address before Literary societies 8 p. m., Tuesday 

1 [June 10, 1890 
Commencement day ...... Wednesday, June 11, 1890 



__ 



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*J 








OF 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF ALABAMA. 







^Agricultural E^cperimeat iDtatioa. 



SO-A.K1D OP TTXSXTQ2&S. 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION ! 

Hon. J. G. Gilchrist, 
Hon. R. F. Ligon, 
Hon. J. B. Mitchell. 



BOARD OF DIRECTION— Officers of the Station : 

f 

W. L. Broun President. 

J. S. Newman Director and Agriculturist. 

N. T. Lupton Vice-Director and Chemist. 

tP. H.Mell Botanist. 

■','"' . Biologist. 

ASSISTANTS: 

Isaac Ross, First Asssistant Agriculturist in charge of Live Stock 
and Dairy. 

James Clayton ...Second Assistant Agriculturist. 

J. T. Anderson, Ph. D First Assistant Chemist. 

L. W. Wilkinson, M. Sc Second Assistant Chemist. 

P. L. Hutchinson Third Assistant Chemist. 

T.D.Samford, B. Sc Assistant Botanist. 

tProf. Mellhas also charge of Meteorological Observations. 



THE HATCH ACT. 



An Act to establish agricultural experiment stations in connection 
with the colleges established in the several States, under the pro- 
visions of an act approved July second, eighteen hundred and sixty- 
two, and of the acts supplementary thereto. 
Be it enacted in the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, That in order to 
aid in acquiring and diffusing among the people of the United States 
useful and practical information on subjects connected with agricul- 
ture, and to promote scientific investigation and experiment respect- 
ing the principles and applications of agricultural science, there shall 
be established, under direction of the college or colleges or agricultu- 
ral department of colleges in each State or Territory established, or 
which may hereafter be established, in accordance with the provisions 
of an act approved July second, eighteen hundred and sjxty-two, en- 
titled "An act donating public lands to the several States and Terri- 
tories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and 
the mechanic arts," or any of the supplements to said act, a depart- 
ment to be known and designated as an "agricultural experiment sta- 
tion:" Provided, that in any State or Territory in which two such 
colleges have been or may be so established, the appropriation herein- 
after made to such States or Territory shall be equally divided be- 
tween such t colleges, unless the Legislature of such State or Territory 

shall otherwise direct, 

SEC. 2. That it shall be the object and duty of said experiment 
stations to conduct original researches, or verify experiments on the 
physiology of plants and animals; the diseases to which they are sev- 
erally subject with the remedies for the same; the chemical compo- 
sition of useful plants at their different stages of growth; the compar- 
ative advantages of rotative cropping as pursued under a varying se- 
ries of crops, the capacity of new plants or trees for acclimation; the 
analysis of soils and water; the chemical composition of manures, 
natural or artificial, with experiments designed to test their compara- 
tive effects on crops of different kinds; the adaption and value of 
grasses and forage plants; the composition and digestibility of the 
different kinds of food for domestic animals; the scientific and econom- 
ic questions involved in the production of butter and cheese; and such 
other researches or experiements bearing directly on the agricultural 
industry of the United States as may in each case be deemed advisa- 



i 



60 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

* 

ble, having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of the res- 
pective States or Territories. 

SEC. 3. That in order to secure, as far as practicable, uniformity 
of methods and results in the work of said stations, it shall be the 
duty of the United States Commissioner of Agriculture to furnish 
forms, as far as practicable, for the tabulation of results of investiga- 
tion or experiments; to indicate from time to time, such lines of -in- 
quiry as to him shall seem most important; and, in general, to furnish 
such advice and assistance as will best promote the purposes of this 
act. It shall be the duty of each of said stations, annually, on or be- 
fore the first day of Feburary, to make to the governor of the State or 
Territory in which it is located a full and detailed report of its opera- 
tions, including a statement of receipts and expenditures, a copy of 
which report shall be sent to each of said stations, to the said Com- 
missioner of Agriculture, and to the Secretary of the Treasury of the 
United States. 

Sec. 4. That bulletins or reports of progress shall be published at 
said stations at least once in three months, One copy of which shall be 
sent to eactf newspaper in the States and Territories in which they are 
respectively located, and to such individuals actually engaged in farm- 
ing as may request the same, and as far as the means of the station 
will permit. Such bulletins or reports and the annual reports of said 
stations shall be transmitted in the mails of the United States free of 
charge for postage, under such regulations as the Postmaster 
General may from time to time prescribe. 

Sec. 5. That for the purpose of paying the necessary expenses of 
conducting investigations and experiments, and printing and distribu- 
ting the results as hereinbefore prescribed, the sum of fifteen thous- 
and dollars per annum is hereby appropriated to each State, to be 
specially provided for by Congress in the appropriations from year to 
year, and to each Territory entitled under the provisions of section 
eight of this act, out of any money in the Treasury proceeding from 
the sales of public lands, to be paid in equal quarterly payments, on 
the first day of January, April, July and October in each year, to the 
treasurer or other officer duly appointed by the governing boards of 
said colleges to receive the same, the first payment to be made on the 
first day of October, eighteen hundred and eighty-seven: Provided, 
however t That out of the first annual appropriation so received by 
any station an amount not exceeding one-fifth may be expended in 
the erection, enlargement, or repair of a building or buildings necessa- 
ry for carrying on the work of such station; ^and thereafter an amount 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 6 1 



not exceeding five per centum of such annual appropriation may be so 
expended, 

Sec. 6. That whenever it shall appear to the Secretary of the 
Treasury from the annual statement of receipts and expenditures of 
any of said stations, that a portion of the preceding annual appropria- 
tion remains unexpended, such amount shall be deducted from the 
next succeeding annual appropriation to such station, in order that the 
amount of money appropriated to any station shall not exceed the 
amount actually and necessarily required for its maintenance and 

support. 

Sec. 7. That nothing in this act shall be construed to impair or 
modify the legal relation existing between any of the said colleges and 
the government of the States or Territories in which they are respec- 
tively located. 

SEC. 8. That in States having colleges entitled under this section 
to the benefits of this act, and having also agricultural experiment sta- 
tions established by law separate from said colleges, such States shall 
be authorized to apply such benefits to experiments at stations so es- 
tablished by such States; "and in case any State shall have established, 
under the provisions of said act of July second aforesaid, an agricultu- 
ral department or experimental station, in connection with any univer- 
sity, college or institution not distinctly an agricultural college - or 
school, and such State shall have established or shall hereafter estab- 
lish a separate agricultural college or school, which shall have con- 
nected therewith an experimental farm or station, the Legislature of 
such State may apply in whole or in part the appropriation by this act 
made, to such separate agricultural college or school, and no Legisla- 
ture shall by contract express or implied disable itself from so doing. 

SEC. 9. That the grants of money authorized by this act are made 
subject to the legislative assent of the several States and Territories to 
the purposes of said grants: Provided, That payments of such 
installments of the appropriation herein made as shall become due to 
any State before the adjournment of the regular session of its Legis- 
lature, meeting next after the passage of this act, shall be made upon 
the assent of the Governor thereof duly certified to the Secretary of 

the Treasury. 

Sec. 10. Nothing in this act shall be held or construed as binding 
the United States to continue any payments from the Treasury to any 
or all the States or institutions mentioned in this act, but Congress 
may at any time amend, suspend, or repeal any or all the provisions of 

this act. 
Approved, March 2, 1887. 






62 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE ALABAMA AGRICUL- 
TURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 



The Board of Trustees of the Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
met in Montgomery February 24 and 25, 1888, and organized the 
Agricultural Experiment Station under the provisions of the "Hatch 
act," as follows: 

1. In accordance with the act of Congress, approved March 2d, 
1887, to establish experiment stations in the several States, the Gov- 
ernor of this State having given his certified assent to the purposes of 
the grant, as required in the act, there is hereby established under 
the provisions of said act, for the purposes therein named, the exper- 
iment station of the Agricultural and Mechanical College, of Alabama; 
and said station is hereby made a department of the Agricultural and 
Mechanical College, and as such shall, as other departments, be 
under the general supervision of the president of the college. 

2. All moneys received from the United States Treasury under the 
aforesaid act of Congress, shall be faithfully used for the purposes de- 
signated in said act. 

3. The president of the college shall present in his annual report 
to the trustees such reconmendations as in his opinion will promote 
the efficiency of the station; and to him all reports of the several de- 
partments of the station shall be made. 

4. The president of the college and such other officers attached to 
the station, as may be appointed by the trustees, shall constitute a 
board of direction, and to said board all subjects relating to the ex- 
periment station shall be referred. And in order to secure unity of 
purpose in research, the board of direction shall confer together and 
determine the experimentation and research which shall be under- 
taken, and adopt each year a definite line of work; it being provided 
the work undertaken shall, as far as possible, have reference to ques- 
tions of practical interest to the farmers of Alabama. The board 
shall meet at regular periods, and at any time subject to the call of 
the president and shall keep a record of its proceedings. 

5. A member of the board of Direction shall be appointed by the 
trustee officer in charge ; who in addition to the special duties of the 
station to which he may be assigned, shall conduct the general cor- 
respondence incidental to the work of the station. 

6. It shall be the duty of the station to examine free of charge 
articles relating to agriculture, sent by citizens of the State, when of 




AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 63 

public utility, under such regulations as may be prescribed, and to 
perform all duties now required of the experiment station established 
at the college by the trustees under the law of the State. 

7. No officer of the station shall engage in any occupation, or 
accept any position that will in any manner interfere with the faithful 
performance of his duties ; and no property of any character belonging 
to the experiment station shall be used for private purposes. 

8. All proceeds arising from sales from the proceeds of the farm 
shall be paid to the Treasurer of the College, who shall account fo r 
the same to the trustees; and when the Director receives any money 
from farm products, he shall make an itemized statement in writing 
from what source such money is received, which statement shall, with 
the money, be turned over to the Treasurer, and no money shall be 
paid to the Director unless upon warrant signed by the President of 
the College. 

9. A committee of visitors composed of three trustees shall be 
appointed, who shall during the year, as often as they may deem 
necessary, visit and inspect each department of the experiment 
Station, and make a special report at the annual meeting of the Board, 
and no permanent improvement shall be constructed without the ap- 
proval of the committee. 

10. The organization of the experiment station herein provided for 
shall take effect April 1st, 1888, and continue so long as the act of 
Congress remains in force; and the Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege receives the money therein appropriated. 



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64 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



ASSENT OF THE STATE LEGISLATURE. 



Joint Resolutions of the State Legislature to Give Assent to the Purposes 
of the Grant made, by the Act of Congress, to Establish Agricultural 
Experiment Stations in Connection with the Land Grant Colleges. 

Whereas, The Congress of the United States having passed an 
act, approved March 2, 1887, entitled, -An act to establish Agricul- 
tural Experiment Stations in connection with the colleges established 
in the several States under the provisions of an act approved July 2, 
1862, and of the act supplementary thereto," and 

Whereas, It being provided in said act "That the grants of moneys 
authorized by this acts are made subject to the legislative assent of 
the several States and Territories, to the purposes of said grants" ; 
therefore be it 

"Resolved, By the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring, 
That the assent of the General Assembly of Alabama is hereby given 
to the purposes of the grants made in said act of Congress ; and that 
the trustees of the Agricultural College of Alabama, at Auburn, are 
hereby authorized and directed to comply with the terms and condi- 
tions expressed in the act aforesaid." 

Approved February 27th, 1889. 



The following is from the act of Congress, making the appropria- 
tion for the Agricultural Experimental Station for the fiscal year end- 
ing June, 1890, and for other purposes. 

The section making the appropriation has this proviso : 

"Provided, That as far as practicable, all such stations shall devote 
a portion of their work to the examination and classification of the 
Soils of their respective States and Territories, with a view to secur- 
ing more extended knowledge and better development of their agri- 
cultural capabilities." 

Approved March 2, 1889. 



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\ 



Agricultural and mechanical college. 65 



EQUIPMENT AND WORK OF THE STATION. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



The Agricultural Department of the Experiment Station was or- 
ganized under State law in July, 1883, and hence there was much 
work already in progress when it was merged into the Station organ- 
ized under the Congressional act known as the "Hatch Bill," April 1st, 
1888. Its equipment has been very much improved through the 
Congressional appropriation and its sphere of operation extended. 
The farm of 226 acres, occupied by the Station under State law, and 
owned by the State is used by the Station under the present organiza- 
tion When purchased in 1883 it was in a very dilapidated condition; 
much of the land having been turned out in the commons, and a 
large portion washed into gulleys. 

THE PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS 

are a dwelling of seven rooms, occupied by the Director ; a four room 
cottage, occupied by the Foreman; a neat, new cottage containing 
offices for the Director and his assistants, and a museum and prepara- 
tion room; a substantial two-story barn; a two story gin house with 
sides and top covered with corrugated iron; a silo, dairy and ice-house; 
large cow stable; engine and boiler house; corn-crib, too rooms, etc. 
The water supply for the green-house and horticultural grounds are 
furnished by two hydraulic rams which utilize the waste from two 
fish ponds. 

THE EQUIPMENT 

consists of a twenty-horse power boiler and fifteen- horse power en- 
gine the latter placed between the barn and gin house so as to drive 
with equal facility a line of shafting upon each building. 

A fortysaw Pratt gin. with feeder and condenser attached, and a 
power press, are in position in the gin-house. and afford the means of 
accurate experimentation with cotton. 

A feed mill and cotton-seed crusher has been provided for grinding 
food for stock, and crushing the green cotton-seed for the purpose of 
nL satisfactorily experimenting with them, both as stock food and 

"a Ross Milage cutter serves the purpose of cutting ensilage for 
filling the silo during the summer and dr.ed hay in winter. 



66 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COtLfc&tf. 



A complete grain separator is stationed by the gin-house and is op- 
erated by the same shafting that runs the gin and cotton press. A 
mower, horse-rake and cutaway harrow have been added to the outfit 
for field work. 

Miss Clementine Snow, of Oxford, Alabama, has presented the 
Station with a sulky plow and cultivator, a rotary-tooth harrow, feed- 
cutter, etc., thus supplementing with most useful implements the pur- 
chased outfit. 

A complete dairy equipment has been purchased, including the 
Cooly creamery and the De Laval separator, and the cow stable has 
twelve thoroughbred Jerseys. 

The pig sties are supplied with thoroughbred Essex and cross-bred 
Berkshire pigs, and feeding experiments are made to test the compar- 
ative value and economy of different Southern field products as pork 
producers. 

The horticultural department has been rapidly developed. A large 
number of varieties of apples, pears, peaches, plumbs, figs, grapes, 
strawberries and raspberries are undergoing experimental test as to 
their comparative productiveness and adaption to this soil and climate. 
These undergo the most critical observation as to habits of growth, 
healthfulness, productiveness, character and quality of fruit and liabil- 
ity of plants and fruit to attack of insects or disease. 

IN THE FIELD. 

A variety of inquiries have been made as to the fertilizers best 
suited to supply the needs of the soil for the most profitable growth of 
our field crops, the choice of the plants as to the sources of supply of 
nitrogen, potash and phosphoric acid, and especially as to the forms in 
which the latter is presented. Especial attention has been given to the 
undergrowth of our cultivated plants and the effects of different 
methods of cultivation upon the development and consequent produc- 
tiveness of the plant. By means of water under-pressure the soil has 
been removed from the roots of corn and cotton plants at different 
stages of growth and under different systems of cultivation. 

Experiments have been conducted with cotton, corn, forage plants, 
small grain, ground-peas, sweet and Irish potatoes. 

The results of all experiments are published in bulletins from time 
to time, and these distributed for the benefit of the farmers. 

The interests of the amateur and the commercial gardener have not 
been overlooked, but a great variety of experiments have been made 
with melons and vegetables, involving the expenditure of much time 
in making the daily observations necessary to collect the facts of most 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 67 

interest to the grower of these perishable products. Especial atten- 
tion has been given to inquiries as to earliness and productiveness 
of different varieties. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

The Chemical Department of the Agricultural Experiment Station, 
in connection with the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama, 
includes in its present organization, the Chemist and three assistants. 

The new building for the Department of Chemistry is completed in all 
.its arrangements and admirably adapted to meet the growing demand 
of modern progress in this department of science. In this building, a 
description of which is given in this catalogue, is* located the State 
Chemical Laboratory where all the chemical works of the Experiment 
Station are carried on. The greatest care has been taken to secure the 
very best form of work tables, niches and hoods lor carrying off offen- 
sive fumes, sinks, gas, water and other conveniences and necessaries 

for effective work. 

The equipment is the very best that can be secured from manufac- 
turers in this country and in Europe. In addition to the apparatus 
usually found in chemical laboratories and especially where soils, 
fertilizers, feed stuffs and dairy products are analyzed and their prop- 
erties and capabilities investigated, may be mentioned, a new Schmidt 
& Haensch's Polariscope for sugar determinations, Zeiss' microscope 
and Refractometer, and a new and special arrangement for carrying on 
at the same time a number of nitrogen determinations by the Kjeldahl 
method. The Library of the Experiment Station contains a large 
number of standard works of reference and is supplied with the princi- 
pal French, English and German scientific journals. 

In addition to the work directly connected with the Station, the 
Chemist is Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry in the 
Agricultural and Mechanical College and Official Chemist of the State 
Department of Agriculture. On.the application of the Commissioner 
of Agriculture he is required by law to "analyze and certify the analysis 
of all fertilizers, samples of which are furnished him." 

The variety and extent of this work can be seen from the following 
tabular statement of the number and character of the quantitative 
analyses made during the year 1888. In the analyses of fertilizers only 
those constituents have been determined which are required under th 
State law, viz.: water soluble, citrate soluble, and acid soluble phos- 
phoric acid, nitrogen and potash. 






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68 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



s 



Number and character of quantitative analyses made in the State 
Chemical Laboratory during the year 1888. 

SUBSTANCES ANALYZED. NUMBER. 

Acid Phosphates with Nitrogen and Potash 84 

Acid Phosphates with Potash ........... 8 

Acid Phosphates 57 

Raw bone meal 2 

Natural Guanos l % 

Phosphatic rocks and deposits • 1 

Marls and Calcareous rocks ........... 5 

Tankage 1 

Cotton seed meal 3 

Cotton see hull ash .............. 1 

Cave earths 3 

Kainit and potash salts ............ 8 

Feed stuffs 3 

Nitrogenous materials .............. 5 

Carbonaceous matter, or muck 1 

Potatoes 9 

Soils and sub-soils 20 

Coal . 5 

Iron ores . . 2 

Clays 4 

Waters 1 

Gold ores 2 

* t 

Total ...*....... 243 

In addition to the above, a considerable number of mineralogical 
specimens, the character of which could be ascertained by simple qual- 
itative tests, were examined and their value determined. 

The details of the quantitative work done are to be found in the 
quarterly bulletins issued during the year. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND METEOROLOGY. 



W 



This department was not organized until the year was about half 
gone, and little could be done toward collecting plants for study be- 
fore the early frosts. The assistant, however, was placed in the field 
as soon as possible, and many of the wild plants of the county, where 
the college is located, were collected and pressed for future examina- 
tion. These plants represent species of grasses, weeds and woods, 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 69 

In the last two quarterly bulletins partial lists of the woods of Ala- 
bama were published, with descriptions of some of the most valuable 
specimens. This work on the woods will be continued from time to 
time until the entire State is covered. The large number of specimens 
of grasses and weeds collected since the burning of the college muse- 
um have been assorted, and manuscripts have been prepared for pub- 
lication in future bulletins. Much work has been done toward classi- 
fying the noxious weeds of Eastern Alabama, and results of experi- 
ments are being collated to show the farmers how to eradicate them 

from the cultivated fields. 

Many experiments under the microscope have been made on twelve 
varieties of the cotton plant to show the effect produced on the fibre 
by different methods of cultivation. A number of sections have been 
made of the plant during its different stages of growth and carefully 
photographed. Measurements have been made of the fibre and its 

strength detei mined. . u*mm* 

The Botanical Laboratory of the Experiment Station is now equipped 

as follows : 

One Zeiss Microscope Stand II a, 

Objectives : .16. .8, 4. .2 (Immersion), 

Oculars: 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, 

1 micrometer ocular, 

Goniometer ocular, 

Abbe camera lucida, 

1 Zeiss compound dissecting lens, 

1 Bausch & Lomb's dissecting microscope, 

j « Laboratory microtome, 

Plant presses, 

Solar microscope aud camera, 

Dissecting instruments, . 

Turn tables and mounting material and chemicals 

The work in meteorology has been in successful operation in the 
State sinc^ ^1884 but since the organization of the Experiment Station 
nLder he Hatch Act, the facilities for observation at the college station 
STbS drably enlarged, The following instruments comprise 
the outfit at the station: 



207874 






m 



70 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 



A mercurial barometer by Green, carefully corrected and compared 
wan the standard at Washington. 

Maximum and minimum thermometers by Green. 

Hygrometer. 

Solar radiator. 

Terrestrial radiator. 

Rain gauge—standard make. 

Anemometer with electrical recorder by Gibbon. 

Wind vane — signal service pattern. 

Three sets of soil thermometers ranging in depth from one inch to 
ninety- six inches. 

The barometer, maximum and minimum thermometers, hygrometer, 
rain gauge, and wind vane, belong to the United States signal service. 

Besides the college station, reports are received from twenty-six ob- 
servers in different sections of the State, who are supplied, through the 
the liberality of the Chief Signal Officer, with maximum and minimum 
thermometers and rain gauges. From the data obtained from these 
observers regular monthly bulletins have been issued since 1884, and 
distributed among the farmers of the State. Weekly bulletins, indi- 
cating the effects produced upon the crops by the changes of the 
weather, are issued on every Saturday during the crop season. 



** * 

Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



1889 



b 








Rec stat: 


n 








Replaced: 


19970429 


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19970429 


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ISSN: 


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Cont: 


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Dates: 1873. 


.1893 1 



b *h a *i u *j p 1 



OCLC: 36819601 
Entered: 19970429 

► Type: a ELvl: 
BLvl: s Form: 
S/L: Orlg: 
Desc: a SrTp: 

► 1 040 AAA *c AAA f 

► 2 007 h *b c *d b *e f *f u *g 

► 3 043 n-us-al I 

► 4 090 LD271 *b .A76 I 

► 5 090 tb 

► 6 049 AAAA | 

► 7 110 2 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. I 

► 8 245 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama ±h [microform] I 

► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 10 246 10 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Auburn, Alabama 1 

► 11 246 10 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama 1 

► 12 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama f 

Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, 1 
21 v. ; *c 21 cm. 1 
Annual I 
) 1872-73-1892-93. I 

Title varies slightly. I 

Microfilm. *m 1873-1893. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
*d 1997. *c microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. I 

► 19 539 d *b 1873 *c 1893 *d alu *e u *f u *g a I 

► 20 650 Universities and colleges *z Alabama *x Periodicals. I 

► 21 610 20 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 
Periodicals. I 

► 22 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue and 
circular of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama f 

► 23 785 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute I .— =* 

► 24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project I 



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ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 
CATALOGUE 
1889-90 . 



AUBURN UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY 




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ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 





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1890. 






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AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

Alabama F*olytectinio Institute. 




Sw 




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ATALOGUE 



•OF THE- 



STATE 



Agricultural and Mechanical 



C OLi;eG^' 



/ 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 




1889-90. 



AUBURN, .... ALABAMA. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 



His Excellency THOMAS SEAY, President.....); ex-officio 

SOLOMON PALMER, Superintendent of Education ex-officio 




JONATHAN HARALSON (term expires 1895) Selma 

R. F. LIGON (term expires 1895) Tuskegee 

JOHN W. BISHOP (term expires 1895) Talladega 



R. F. KOLB (term expires 1893) Eufaula 

J. B. MITCHELL ....(term expires 1893) Seale 

T. G. BUSH (term expires 1893) Mobile 



J. G. GILCHRIST (term expires 1891) Montgomery 

M. L.STANSEL (term expires 1891) Carrollton 

C C. HARRIS (term expires 1891) Decatur 



E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. 

F. M. REESE, Secretary and Auditor. 



/ 



% 






ffx) 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



•9ARKSDALE 

0*»* 






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Wm. LeROY BROUN, M. A., LL. D., * 

President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, M. E., Ph. D., 

Professor of Natural History and Geology. 

JAMES H. LANE, C. E., A. M., 

Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

J. S. NEWMAN, 
Professor of Agriculture and Director of Experiment Station. 

CHARLES C. THACH, B. E., 

Professor of English and Latin. 

N. T. LUPTON, A. M., M. D., LL. D., 

Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

Libut. JOHN B. McDONALD, 10th Cavalry U. S. A. (West £oint), 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 

GEORGE H. BRYANT, M. E. (Mass. Inst. Technology), 
Director of Laboratory and Instructor of Mechanic Arts. 

GEORGE F. ATKINSON, Ph. B., 

Professor of Biology. 

CHARLES H. BARNWELL, A. M., " 

Adjunct Professor of Modern Languages and History. 

L. W. W r ILKINSON, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Chemical Laboratory. 

J. J. WILMORE, M. E., 
B. A. BLAKEY, M. So., 

Assistant Instructors in Mechanic Arts. 

M. DOWNER PACE, 
ARTHUR St. C. Dunstan, B. Sc, 
BOWLING H. CRENSHAW, B. Sc, 
* H. CLAY ARMSTRONG, B. Sc, 
t P. T. VAUGHAN, B. Sc, 
Assistants in Mathematics and English. 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D., 

Surgeon. 

{ C. C. THACH, ' 

Librarian and Recording Secretary. 

O.D.SMITH, 

Corresponding Secretary. 
* Resigned March, 1890. 
f Appointed March, 1890. 






' 



k 



■Z0 t+ejlfl 




OFFICERS 



OF THE 



eAgricultural ^pcperimeat Ration. 



BOARD OF VISITORS. 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION: 

J. G. GILCHRIST/ 
R. F. LIGON, 
J. B. MITCHELL. 



OFFICERS OF THE STATION: 

W. L. Broun « , , 

President 

J. S.Newman Director and Agriculturist 

N. T. Lupton ;... Vice Director and Chemist 

*P.H.Mell 

v Botanist 

G.F.Atkinson ■. 

Biologist 

ASSISTANTS: 

Isaac Ross, First Asst. Agriculturist in Charge of Live Stock and Dairy 

Jas. Clayton ... _ Second Assistant Agriculturist 

J. T. Anderson, Ph. D ^ Assi8tant Chemi8t 

L. W. Wilkinson, M. Sc Second Assistant Chemist 

P. L. Hutchinson... Third Assistant Chemist 

A. M. Lloyd, B. S.. a . * * « 

1 * * Assistant Botanist 

♦Prof. Mell has charge of Meteorological Observations. 



OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 



The leading object of the College, in conformity with 
the act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, 
is to teach the principles and the applications of science. 

In its course of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially those that relate 
to agriculture and the mechanic arts, so far as the facilities 
at its disposal will permit ; and at the same time the dis- 
cipline obtained by the study of languages and other 
sciences is not neglected. 

All students are required to study the English language- 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to students in any 
course. 

The special or technical instruction given is thus based 
on a sound, general education. 

The College, in fact, has become a distinctive school of 
industrial science — or Polytechnic Institute — a title 
which by resolution of the trustees is permitted to be in- 
scribed on the catalogue — and work of great value to the 
youth of the State is now being accomplished by fitting 
them, by a thorough science-discipline, in which handi- 
craft in the lower classes is made a prominent feature, for 
the successful and honorable performance of the respon- 
sible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline 
of the students in endeavoring to train them to habits of 
accurate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them for 
the duties of life, their moral and Christian training will 
always constitute the prominent care and thought of the 
Faculty. 



■i 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 









LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR 

INSTRUCTION. 



The College npw possesses facilities for giving labo- 
ratory instruction in applied science in the following 
departments : 

I. — IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 

The farm contains 226 acres and is supplied with illus- 
trated specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in con- 
nection with the College, where experiments and scien- 
tific investigations relating to agriculture are daily made, 
affords unusual opportunities to students to become 
familiar with agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where 
lectures are delivered in presence of the object discussed, 
and during the year exercises in practical agriculture are 
given the students who enter upon this course of study. 

II IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of Mechanic Arts is used as an auxiliary 
in industrial education, as a school of manual training in 
the arts that constitute the foundation of various industrial 
pursuits. The work performed by the students is instructive 
m character, as in any other laboratory, and the classes 
are taught in sections by a series of graded lessons under 
the supervision of the professor. In the lower classes of 
the College each student enters this school , and is assigned 
three exercises a week, each exercise being two hours 
long. 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade, but 
to educate to discipline and train the eye and the hand, as 
well as the mind, and thus, by associating manual and 



- 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 7 

mental training, to thoroughly educate the student for the 
duties of life, whatever his vocation may be. There is no 
attempt to teach students special skill in constructing arti- 
cles of commercial value, but all the exercises are system- 
atically arranged and designed for purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall 
90x50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse power 
Corliss engine, with indicator, a planer, circular saw, band- 
saw, two scroll saws, a buzz planer, twenty stands with 
lathes, with full sets of lathe and carpentry tools required 
for instruction. 

A brick building with two rooms, each 30x35 feet has 
been constructed especially for instruction in working 

iron. 

One room is equipped with sixteen forges and tools re- 
quired for a forge department, the other with a cupola 
furnace, having a capacity of 1,000 pounds, a core oven, 
moulding benches and special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a 
Sturtevant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from 
the engine. 

The machine department is equipped with "eight engine 
lathes— one speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one post 
drill, one shaper, one five-foot planer, one universal mill- 
ing machine, a corundum tool-grinder and small emery 
grinder. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches and vises for twelve students. 

The Weston dynamo, used at present for lighting the 
halls, is located in a room adjoining the Mechanic Art 
laboratory, and is run by a ten-horse power engine, con- 
structed by the students in the Mechanic Arts. 

It is designed to supply the different laboratories with 
electricity by this dyiiamo. 









I 






8 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



UI. — IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The new chemical laboratory is supplied with new and 
modern apparatus, and in its entire equipment affords ex- 
cellent facilities for instruction in practical chemistry. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this laboratory 
by scientific experts, in connection with the work of the 
agricultural experiment station, are of especial value to 
advanced students, and afford them unusual opportunities 
to learn the methods of scientific research. The building 
contains a large general laboratory that will accommodate 
sixty students, and lecture room with Capacity for one 
hundred seats, and nine other rooms, all appropriated to 
instruction apd research in chemistry. 

It is equipped with the improved modern appliances 
necessary for instruction and investigation. 

IV. — IN PHYSICS. 

In the new College building provision will be made for 
laboratory work in the department of physics. Special 
rooms in the basement are appropriated for this purpose, 
and it is designed to equip them with all necessary appli- 
ances. An improved testing machine, of 35,000 pounds 
capacity, has recently been purchased of Riehle Bros, 
for this laboratory. 

V. — IN MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the base- 
ment, and is provided with tables and appliances to 
accommodate twenty students. 

VI. — IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station, in- 
vestigations in botany are given special attention, and 
unusual opportunities are offered advanced students for 
practical work in a laboratory especially fitted with micro- 
scopes, tables, a dark room for photographic work, and 
appliances needed for instruction and research. 



2a 



'Agricultural and Mechanical College. 9 

VII. — IK BIOLOGY. 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture 
room of the professor, and is furnished with tables, micro- 
scopes and appliances for investigation. Each student of 
the class works under the supervision of the professor. 

VIII. — IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including tran* 
sits, levels, plane table, etc., is provided for the use of the 
students, and the customary exercises in the field are given. 

IX. — IN DRAWING. 

All the students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 
well as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observa- 
tion and execution. A large, well-lighted drawing room, 
that will accommodate fifty students, is provided with 
tables, lock boxes, etc. 

MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity 
with the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of 
regular military drill, and in addition the military system 
is used as a means of enforcing discipline and securing good 
order, promptness and regularity in the performance of 
academic duties. ■■'..■■ 

This department is under the charge of Lieut. J. B 
McDonald, 10th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

It has recently been supplied with new cadet muskets 
and accoutrements for the corps, and, for artillery practice, 
with two three-inchrrifle guns, carriages and limbers. 



/ 



m -'--■ ?z ",. . ■ 



. 









10 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



COLLEGE BUILDING. 

The frontispiece is a representation of the recently 
constructed main college building. It is 160 by 71 feet, 
and contains, exclusive of the basement floor, thirty-five 
rooms. This building is not used for dormitories for stu- 
dents, but is appropriated for purposes of instruction and 
investigation. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the profes- 
sors, laboratories, library, museum, armory, etc. The 
illustrations of the four floors on the following pages in- 
dicate the uses to which the rooms have been assigned. 



<* 






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\M in Bvalogical 

Laboratory 



iricultural 
Tu&euffi, 



Store 
Room. 



Corridor 



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Laboratory 



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JLoSoroTory: 



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Second Floor 







Third Floor 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



15 




CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The new chemical laboratory is a handsome two-story structure, 40 
by 60 feet, with a rear projection 35 by 60 feet of one story and base- 
ment. The exterior is of pressed brick, with cut stone trimmings, and 
terra-cotta ornamentation. 

2 y 



16 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 




FIRST FLOOR. 

A, Spectroscope and polariscope room; B, Assistant's private room; C, Com- 
bustion-furnace room, 

On entering, the first room to the left is the office of the professor, 
to the rear of which is the library and balance-room. On the right, 
extending the whole length of the floor, is the State laboratory and 
laboratory for research. Two small rooms are cutoff from this, one 
a balance-room, and the other for the spectroscope and polariscope. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



17 



Leading from the rear of the main hall is the door which enters' the 
large laboratory for general work. Two rooms are cut off from this — 
one for combustion furnaces and the other a private working-room for 
the assistant. 







3 


c 


1 

1 
1 
1 


c 
C 

c 

i 




SECOND FLOOR. 



In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and contains 
the latest improved working-tables, with water, gas and every neces- 
sary appliance for chemical work. Niches in the wall opposite each 
working-table, with hoods where necessary, connect with flues, and 
furnish the best possible means of escape for deleterious vapors, while 









18 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



ventilators in the ceiling furnish additional means for getting rid of 
noxious gases. The pitch is sixteen feet in the clear, with paneled 
ceiling of oiled southern pine. The rooms are wainscoted throughout 
and finished in natural wood. 

The second story contains a lecture-room and room for gas analysis. 
Around this lecture room are cases for containing crude and manu- 
factured products, illustrating the subjects of agricultural and indus- 
trial chemistry, which are prominent subjects taught in this institu- 
tion. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, ninety by fifty feet. The second story 
is the audience hall, used for Commencement and other public occa- 
sions. 

The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of Mechanic Arts* 












! 



GRADUATES IN 1889 



CLASS OF 1889. 



7 



WITH DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 

Leslie Dallas Burdett, . 

Aaron Jason Burr, .... 

Edmond Collins Cochran, 

Abednego Jackson Crawford, . 

Boiling Hall Crenshaw, • 

Arthur Campbell Orowder, 

Howard Grayson Orowder, . 

Howard Staten Doster, 

Arthur St. Charles Dunstan, ■ 

Pleasant Lee Hutchinson, , 

Oscar Don Killebrew, . "•.'■' 

Andrew Manley Lloyd, 

William Lane Martin, . 

Thomas Alexander Ross, . 

Edgar Johnson Spratling, 

Hugh McGhee Taylor, 

Paul Turner Vaughan, . 

Frederick Henry Vernon, . 

Thomas Morgan Watlington, 



SCIENCE. (B. Sc.) 

. Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Montgomery. 

Lee. 

Butler. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Autauga. 

Virginia. 

Georgia. 

Dale. 

Lee. 

Jefferson. 

Lee. 

Chambers. 

Montgomery. 

Dallas. 

Chambers. 
. Marengo. 



WITH DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE. (M. Sc.) 



George Fleming Broun, B. Sc, 
Eugene Willis Harris, B. Sc, , 
Augustus Archilaus Persons, B. Sc, 



Lee. 
Lee. 
Lee. 



WITH DEGREE OF CIVIL ENGINEER. (C. E.J 

John Thomas Gregory, B. Sc, , . Lauderdale. 



Sterling Chambers Pitts, 



Russell. 



3i«im0ui*heb £>iubeni&< 



AWARDED CERTIFICATES IN 1889. 









II 






1 



The students of each class who secure a grade 
above 90 in three or more subjects are dis- 
tinguished for excellence in scholar- 
ship, and are awarded 



The following students received 
1889 : 

FIRST CLASS. 

Aaron Jason Burr, 
Boiling Hall Crenshaw, . 
Howard Grayson Orowdei \ . 
Howard Staten Doster, . . 
Arthur St. Charles Dunstan. 
Pleasant Lee Hutchinson, 
Oscar Don Killebrew, 
Thomas Alexander Rop?, 
Hugh McGhee Taylor, 
Paul Turner Vaughan, . ' ' . 
Frederick Henry Vernon, . 
Thomas Morgan Watlington, . 

SECOND CLASS. 

Benjamin Cheney Abernethy, 
James William Bivins, f 
George Samuel Clark, . ... 



honor certificates in 



Georgia. 

Butler. 

Jefferson. 

Autauga. 

Virginia. 

Georgia. 

Dale. 

Lee. 

Montgomery. 

Dallas. 

Chambers. 

Marengo. 



Florida. 

Lee. 

Montgomery. 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



21 



George Woodhull Emory, . 


Lee. 


Stonewall Jackson Emory, . 


Lee. 


Daniel Gillis, . . . 


Georgia. 


Francis Brooks Matthews, 


. Lee. 


Wilmot Bivins Matthew? . . 


Lee. 


Frank Davis Milstead, . 


Elmore. 


John Milton, • 


Florida. 


George Houston Waring, 


Georgia. 


William Cameron Weisinger, 


Talladega. 


James Fielder Wilkinson, 


Dale. 


THIRD CLASS. 




Lawrence Ernest Baker, 


. Jefferson. 


Harmon Benton, 


Barbour. 


Frank Jar vis Bivins 


. Lee. 


James Albert Cox, • ..<,';• 


Lee. 


James Nathaniel Dean, . . . 


Montgomery. 


Walter Edward Fitzgerald, 


Georgia. 


William Thomas Glass, . .■':■. 


Georgia. 


Beverly Franklin Harwood, 


Perry. 


Cadmus Newton Hughes, 


Walker. 


Charles Cicero Johnson, 


Tallapoosa. 




Hendley Varner Kell, 


Georgia. 


John Calvin Kimball, Jr . 


Georgia. 


Thomas Dixon Lewis, . • 


Butler. 


Frank Allemong Lupton, . 


. Lee. 


William Audley Marshall. . • 


» Georgia. 


Isaac Isaiah Moses, 


Georgia. 


•Robert Clanton Smith, . • . 


Chambers. 


Joseph Hardie Spence, . 


Talladega. 


Jordan Emmett Thomason, 


Randolph. 


FOURTH CLASS. 




Elbert Cathey Avery t, . .. 


Shelby. 


Leigh Stafford Boyd. • .. ' ■ 


Lee. 


OhftTles Allen Brown. • 


Sumter. 



22 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 




Jacob Thomas Bullen, 
Amos Hill Cox, 
Henry Tieknor DeBardeleben, 
Henry Farris Dobbin, . 
James Edward Gachet, 
Raleigh Frederick Hare, 
Leonidas Warren Payne, 
Richard Werner, • 
David Lewis Whetstone, . 



Montgomery. 

Lee. 

Jefferson. 

Florida. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Georgia. 

Elmore. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



FOR THE SESSION 1889-90- 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



[Residence is Alabama when State 

NAME. 

Henry Clay Armstrong, B. Sc., 
Boiling Hall Crenshaw, B. Sc, . 
Arthur St. Charles Dunstan, B. Sc, 
Pleasant Lee Hutchinson, B. Sc, . 
M. Downer Pace, . 
James Miles Quarles, A. B.. 
Paul Turner Vaughan, B. Sc, 



is not named.] 

RESIDENCE. 

. Lee. 
Butler. 
Virginia. 
Georgia. 
Macon. 
Clay. 
Dallas. 



UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS, 



FIRST CLASS. 



Benjamin Cheney Abernethy, 
James William Bivins, 
Thomas Jefferson Brooks, 
Wilmer Callaway, 
Walter Girard Cook, 
George Woodhull Emory, . 
Stonewall Jackson Emory, . 
Francis Maury Fontaine, . 
Daniel Gillis, . . . 

William Groce Harrison, . 
Robert Edward Daniel Irvin, 
John Hammond Little, 



Florida. 

Lee. 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Lowndes. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Talladega. 

Lee. 

Lee. 



wm—mmmmm 






m 



24 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Wilmot Bivins Matthews, 
Frank Davis Milstead, 
John Milton, . 
Americus Mitchell, 
Robert Ernest Noble. . 
Reuben Hayne Poole, 
Percy Willett Terry, . 
McKennie Thomas, 
Thomas Ohilton Thorington, . 
George Houston Waring, . 
James Fielden Wilkinson, 



Lee. 

Elmore. 

Florida. 

Russell. 

Oalhoun. 

Georgia. 

Jefferson. 

Ooosa. 

Montgomery. 

Georgia. 

Jefferson. 



SECOND CLASS. 



Lawrence Ernest Baker, 
Harmon Benton, 
Frank Jarvis Bivins, 
John Postelle Buchanan, 
Seaborn Jesse Buckalew, 
Edgar Duncan Burts, 
James Albert Cox, 
James Nathaniel Dean, 
John Christian Driver, 
Arthur Thomas Dudley, 
Walter Edward Fitzgerald, 
William Thomas Glass, 
Charles Bowls Glenn, . 
Clifford Leroy Hare, . 
Bryant Glower Harvey, 
Beverly Franklin Harwood, 
Charles Cicero Johnson, . 
Egbert Jones, 
John Allen Jones, . 
Hendley VarnerKell, 
John Calvin Kimball, 
Thomas Dixon Lewis, 



:*►'• • 



. Jefferson. 

Barbour. 

Lee. 

Lowndes. 

Chambers, 

Georgia. 
. Lee. 

Montgomery. 

• Perry. 

Georgia. 

. Georgia. 

Georgia. 

• Lee. 
Lee. 

• Lee. 
Perry. 

Tallapoosa. 
Georgia. 
Lee. 
Georgia. 
. Georgia. 
Butler. 




E 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



25 



Frank Allemong Lupton, 
William Audley Marshall, 
Alexander Dowling McLennan, 
Isaac Isaiah Moses, • 
William Henry Oates, . 
Edward Clyde Powers, 
John Larcus Ray, . 
Petit Reynolds, . 
William Edward Reynolds, . 
Robert Olanton Smith, 
John McOallough Tharin, 
Walter Augustus Thomas, . 
Layton Casey Tucker, . 
Horace Turner, . 
Clanton Ware Williams, 



. Lee. 

Georgia. 
. Georgia. 

Georgia. 
. Mobile. 

Lee. 
. Clay. 

Macon. 
•' Macon. 

Chambers. 
. Georgia. 

Chambers. 

. Lee. 
Mobile. 

. Montgomery, 



THIRD CLASS. 



William Sayre Allen, . 
Walter Lampkin Anthony. 
Archie Scruggs Averett, 
Earl Averitt, . • . • 
Elbert Cathey Averyt, . 
Charles Dunwoody Bassett, 
Louis Alexander Bize, . 
Leigh Stafford Boyd, . r • 
Frank Manson Brannon, 
Charles Allen Brown, 
Jacob Thompson Bullen, 
Joseph Little Burr, . 
Walter Bartow Clay, • 
Alpheus David Connor, • 
Amos Hill Cox, • 
H'enry Benning Crawford, . 
John Gereardt Orommelin, 
Henry Lee Davidson, . 



Montgomery. 

Bullock. 

Georgia. 

Jefferson. 

Shelby. 

Georgia. 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Russell. 

Sumter. 

Montgomery. 

Georgia. 
Montgomery. 
South Carolina, 

Lee. 
Georgia. 
Montgomery. 
Montgomery. 



!| i 









y 



m*wmmmmma^~^^—m 



26 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



George William Dantzler, 
William Caleb Dean, . 
Henry Ticknor Debardeleben, 
Henry Farris Dobbin, 
Robert Sedgwick Edwards, • 
Ashby Floyd, . 
Charles McKendree Floyd, . 
James Edward Gachet, 
Howard Glover, . 
Eugene Hamiter Graves, . 
Raleigh Williams Greene, . 
Raleigh Frederick Hare, 
Walter Crafts Hazard, 
Louis Philip Heyman, 
Arthur William Holstun, 
Andrew Silous Horn, . 
Thomas Pearson Hutchinson, 
Mims Lamar Howard, 
Arthur Lynn Jones, 
—Clifton Arthur Jones, 
Neely Forsyth Jones, 
Harvey Ellis Jones, . 
Frank Keen, 

Charles Leonard Ledbetter, 
Harold Magruder, . 
Robert Dibrell McAllister, . 
Glen McCulloh, 

Benjamin Walter McCutchen, . 
Duncan McDougald, 
Alfred Huger Moses, . 
Frank McLemore Mosely, 
Louis Sinclair Munford, 
Leonidas Warren Payne, 
Frank Peabody, 
James Wesley Pierce, . 
falter Evan Richards, .. . 



. Autauga. 

Chambers. 
• Jefferson. 
Florida. 

Massachusetts. 
Lee. 
. Chambers. 
Lee. 

Georgia. 
Barbour. 
Lee. 
Lee. 

Calhoun. 
Georgia. 
Tallapoosa. 
Olay. 
Georgia. 
Autauga. 
Autauga. 
Lee. 
Russell. 
Mobile. 
Georgia. 
Jefferson. 
Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Lee. 
Lee. 

Georgia. 
Colbert. 

Montgomery. 

Hale. 

Lee. 

Georgia. 

Lee. 

Chambers. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 2T 



William Cinder Roberson, 
Robert Lee Shipp, • 
Joseph Augustus Speetf, 
John Joseph Street, . 
Signor Sidney Strong, . 
George Adams Thomas, 
William Augustus Thomas, 
Sheldon Lynn Toomer, 
Robert Jefferson Trammell, 
Sydenham Benjamin Trapp, 
David Marshall Walker, 
Richard Werner, 
David Lewis Whetstone, 
Richard Lane Williams, • 
Thomas Felton Wimberly, 
David Edwin Wilson, 
Alfred Anderson Wellborn, 



Chilton. 

Georgia. 

Greene. 

Tallapoosa. 

Georgia. 

Montgomery. 

Chambers. 

Lee. 

Lee* 

Calhoun. 

Marengo. 

Georgia. 

Elmore. 

Jefferson. 

Lee. 

Jefferson. 

Georgia. 



FOURTH CLASS, SECTION A. 



Andrew Jackson Abercrombie, 
Wallace Reverdy Bishop, . 
Robert Lee Gordon Bivins, • 
James Marion Blanton, 
Posey Party Brooks, 
Lee Callaway, . 
Thomas Eugene Chambless, . 
Clifford Fontaine Olopton, . 
Charles Henry Crowder, 
Walter Scott Crump, 
Joseph Franklin Curtis, 
Octavius DeShields Davis, 
George Alpheus Dennis, 
Richard Augustus Drake, . 
Milton Reese Dudley, • 
Joel Dumas, 



Jefferson. 

Talladega. 

Lee. 

Winston. 

Escambia. 

Montgomery. 

Georgia. 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

St. Clair. 

Shelby. 

Madison. 

Chilton. 

Georgia. 

Lowndes. 

Wilcox, 



28 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Thomas Martin Edwards, 
Ralph Us8ery Falkner, 
Porter Campbell Flanagan, 
David Sylus Flanagan, 
Thomas Preston Flanagan, . 
Milton Tucker Floyd, . 
John David Foster, 
Thomas Gardner Foster, 
John Flynn, . . . 
Orossland Clarence Hare, 
John Wethersby Hatcher, 
Joseph Andrew Herron, . 
Joseph Andrew Holifield, 
John Henry Holt, 
William Bostwick Howard, . 
•Casey Rex Hudson, . 
Jeremiah Jackson, 
Young Jackson, ' . 
Hamilton Rowan Johnstone, 
Byron Watts Jones, . 
William Driskell Kelley, 
Oharles David Kline, 
James Monroe Little, . 
. JSTimrod Lunsford Long, 
Thomas Francis Long, 
Edward Baker Mell, . 
Hillory Herbert Milner, 
John Kennedy Moore, 
Charles Carter Newman, 
Minor Evan Nicholson, 
John Austin Norton, 
Joseph Samuel Pou, . 
Sidney Powell Reaves, . 
Charles Dodson Robertson, 
William Chappell Ross, 
Rufus William Rotton, 



Jefferson. 

Montgomery, 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Chambers. 

Lee. 

Montgomery. 

Marshall. 

Lee. 

Georgia. 

Montgomery. 

Lee. 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Elmore. 

Mobile. 

Lee. 

Dallas. 

Texas. 

Lee. 

Russell. 

Sumter. 

Georgia. 

Jefferson. 

Lee. 

Lee. 

Georgia. 

Montgomery. 
Lee. 

Georgia. 

Jefferson. 

Lee. 

Chambers. 



■■^■H 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



29 



William Joseph Holt Shrews, 
Guy Allen Shafer, 
Logan Abner Siebold, . 
William Gulley Simpson, . 
Charles Henry Smith, 
Linton Sparks Smith, 
James Howard Smith, . 
Henry Williamson Sparks, ■ 
Rosser Colbert Spratling, 
William Simeon Street, 
Wyeth Todd, 

George Augustus Tonsmeire, 
William Van Antwerp, 
Charles Hutchinson Weston, 
Walter Eoy Weedon, 
William Dunbar Wills, 
Thomas Chalmers Wilson, 
Allie Walter Williams, 
Clifton Hall Williamson, 
George DeKalb Winston, . 
John Mitchell Woolley, . 



Montgomery. 
Perry. 
Marshall. 
Wilcox. 
Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Georgia. 
Ohambers. 
Tallapoosa. 
Marshall. 
'Mobile. 
Mobile. 
Colbert. 
Barbour. 
Mississippi. 
Jefferson. 
Georgia. 
Montgomery. 
Lee. 
Georgia. 









■ i 



FOURTH CLASS, SECTION B. 



Felix Reuben Allison, . 
Harvey Armstrong, . 
AndrewHamilton Ayres, 
Kichard Isaac Betts, . 
Wade Hampton Blake, . 
James Walker Bone, ; 
Francis Callaway, . 
William DeLamar Clayton, 
James Rufus Dear, 
James Lee Deuney, . 
Julius Confree Dunham, 
John Thomas Eckford, 



Lee. 

Missouri. 

South Carolina. 

Conecuh. 

Georgia. 

Madison. 

Montgomery. 

Lee. 

Wilcox. 

Ohambers. 

Montgomery. 

Mississippi. 



f 



^™ 



■^^^^^ 



■ 



30 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Benjamin Hardy Foster, 

William Thomas Garner, . 

John Samuel Godwin, . 

Harry Holgate, .... 

Donald Calvin Hayden, 

Norman Orapster Jones 

Daniel Gray Mayes, 

Orrin Joseph McOarley, 

John Robert McNab, 
Moses James McKinzie, 
Patrick Roland Cleburne McFarland, 
Andrew Hammil Milstead, 
William Washington Moore, . 
Lauriston Green Moore. . . 
Thomas Winfrey Oliver, . 
Benjamin Glover Perry, . . 
Henry Lee Porter, . , 

Charles Moss Powell, . . . 
James Harris Pride, 
John Dupree Roquemore, • 
George Noble Ross, 
Philip Jacob Roth, . 
William Pinckney Shuler, 
Robert Otis Stone, . • 
William Collier Slaughter, . 
Henry O'Neil James Speir, 
Allen Campbell Tyson, • 
' Urbie Lewis Weston, . 
Andrew Hearne Whitman, 
Arthur Zachariah Wright, 
Cary Oscar Wright, 



Tuscaloosa. 

Madison. 

Barbour. 

Georgia. 

South Carolina.. 

Jefferson. 

Greene. 

Chambers. 

Barbour. 

Lowndes. 

Lauderdale. 

Elmore. 

Blount. 

Lee. ~ 

Montgomery. 

Greene. 

St. Clair. 

Bullock. 

Madison. 

Montgomery. 

Lee. 

Dallas. 

South Carolina^ 

Mobile. 

Madison. 

Wilcox. 

Montgomery.. 

Colbert. 

Lowndes. 

Lee. 

Lee. 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



31 



SUMMARY. 



Graduates, • • • 
First Class, . • • 
Second Class, 
Third Class, . 
Fourth Class, Section A, 
Fourth Class, Section B, • 

Total, . 



7 

23 
37 
71 
73 
43 



. 254 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN KACH SUBJECT OP STUDY. 



English, . 


239 


Biology, . • . 


17 


History, 


120 


Agriculture, 


104 


French, . 


37 


Physics, . . . 


108 


German, 


24 


Natural History and 




Latin, 


. 58 


Geology, 


107 


Mental Science, . 


17 


Engineering, . . 


28 


.Political Economy, . 


20 


Drawing, 


184 


Mathematics, 


223 


Mechanic Arts, 


140 


Chemistry, . . 

3 


104 


Military Tactics, • 


238 






Military Organizations. 

1 889-'90. 

President. 
Wm. LeROY BROUN. 



Commandant. 
J. B. MCDONALD, 1st Lieut. 10th U. S. Cavalry. 

Surgeon. 
J. H. DRAKE, M. D. 



1. F. D. MILSTEAD, 

2. B. C. ABERNETHY, 



Cadet Captains. 



Cadet Ut Lieutenants. 



1. W. G. HARRISON, Qr. Mr. 

2. R. E. NOBLE, Adj. ' 

3. W.CALLAWAY, 

4. G. H. WARING, 

5. G. W. EMORY, 



1. T. J. BROOKS, 



Cadet 2d Lieutenants. 



Cadet 1st Sergeants. 



1. L. E. BAKER, 

2. J. N. DEAN, 

Cadet Sergeants, 

1. R. C. SMITH, Sgt. Maj. 

2. W. A. MARSHALL, Qr. Mr. Sgt. 

3. C. L. HARE, Color Sgt. 

4. F. J. BIVINS, 

5. W. H. QATES, 

6. C.B.GLENN, 

7. C. C. JOHNSON, 

8. J. C. KIMBALL, 

Cadet Corporals. 

1. F. PEABODY, 

2. C. A. BROWN, 

3. L. S. MUNFORD, 

4. C. L. LEDBBETTER, 

5. J. L. BURR, 

6. J. E.GACHET, 

7. H. B. CRAWFORD, 

8. D. McDOUGALD, 

9. CD. BASSETT, 

10. B.W. McCUTCHEN, 

11. H. F. DOBBIN, 

12. J. T. BULLEN, 

Note.— Numbers indicate the relative rank of 
* Denotes color corporal. 



3. JOHN MILTON, 

4. F. M. FONTAINE. 



6. D. GILLIS, 

7. J, W. BIVINS, 

8. W. G. COOK, 

9. P. W. TERRY, 
10. R. H. POOLE. 



2. W. B. MATTHEWS. 



3. F. A. LUPTON, 

4. B. F. HARWOOD. 



9. C. W. WILLIAMS, 
10. J. A. COX 
H. W.E.FITZGERALD, 

12. S. J. BUCKALEW, 

13. H. BENTON, 

14. E. D. BURTS, 

15. P. REYNOLDS, 

16. E. C. POWERS. 

13. G. W. DANTZLER, 

14. D. L. WHETSTONE, 
*15. R. WERNER, 

*16. E. C. AVERYTT, 
♦17. R. F. HARE, 
*18. A. S. AVERETT, 
♦19. G. A. THOMAS, 

20. G. McCULLOH, 

21. H. F. DEBARDELEBSN, 

22. A. L. JONES, 

23. W. B. CLAY, 

24. R. D. McALLISTFR. 

the officer.' 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



33 



Applicants for admission must be of good moral char- 
acter. To enter the fourth class the applicant must be not 
less than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified to 
pass a satisfactory examination on the following subjects : 

1. Geography and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) An examination upon sentences con- 
taining incorrect English, (b) A composition giving 
evidence of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctua- 
tion, grammar and division into paragraphs. 

3. Mathematics— (a) Arithmetic, including fundamental 
operations ; common and decimal fractions ; denominate 
numbers, the metric system ; percentage, including interest 
and discount; proportion ; extraction of square and cube 
roots, (b) Algebra, to quadratic equations. 

Those applicants who desire to continue the study of 
Latin in the fourth class, should be qualified to pass a 
satisfactory examination in Latin grammar and the first 
books of Csesar, in addition to the above subjects. 
• For admission to the higher classes, students should be 
prepared to stand a satisfactory examination on all the 
studies of the lower classes, as shown in the courts of 
study. Where opportunity has not been offered to pursue 
special studies required at this College, the system of 
equivalents will be adopted, and studies which denote an 
equivalent amount of discipline and training will be 
accepted as satisfactory, 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, the 
10th of September, the day on which the session opens. 
Candidates will also be examined during the session, when 
application is made for admission. 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 









^ 



— 



34 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

examinations for full admission to the fourth class are ad- 
mitted to the sub-college department, which includes the 
fourth class, sec. B. 

They will be advanced to full admission to the fourth 
class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily the 
required examinations. 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report immediately to 
the President No student will be admitted to a recitation in any 
class previous to matriculation. 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen 
recitations per week, or their equivalent, in addition to 
the exercises in laboratory work, drawing and niilitary 
drill. These additional exercises occupy not less than 
twelve hours per week, and in all give twenty-seven exer- 
cises per week required. 



Si 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Students who are qualified to prosecute the studies of 
the second class, and those over twenty-one years of age 
who are not candidates for a degree, are permitted to take 
with the advice of the Faculty, the subjects of study they 
may prefer and for which they may be qualified ; all other 
students will be assigned to one of the regular prescribed 
courses of study, unless otherwise ordered by the Faculty 
Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final 
examinations in any one study become special students. 
They will be classed as regular students pursuing a course 
for a degree, whenever they can pass the examinations in 
those subjects in which they were found deficient. 

Students who are not in full standing in all the pre 
scribed studies of a class rank in the military department 
with that class in which they have the greater number of 
studies, and their names are so placed in the Catalogue 



m 



■ 



— 



— 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



35 



The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and 
Natural Sciences, with their applications ; Agriculture, 
Biology, Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Engineer- 
ing, Drawing, English, French, German and Latin 
Languages, History, Political Economy, Mental and Moral 

Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to 
offer a liberal and practical education as a preparation for 
the active pursuits of life. 

There are three degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and 
requiring four years for its completion : 

I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 

II. Course in Mechanics and Engineering. 

III. General Course. 

There are also two partial courses, each requiring two 
years for its completion: 

IV. Two Years' Course in Agriculture. 

V. Two Years' Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I. includes theoretical and practical instruction 
in those branches that relate to checiistry and agriculture, 
and is especially adapted to those who propose to devote 
themselves to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II. includes the principles and applications of 
the sciences that directly relate to civil and mechanical 
engineering, and is adapted to those who expect to enter 
the profession of engineering. 

Course III. has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language to 
meet the wants of those students who have selected no 
definite vocation in life, as well as of those who propose 
ultimately to engage in teaching, or in some commercial or 
manufacturing business. • . 



jfc, #., — ^ 



*■++' **•* * ' '* 



\. 



.*•* * **- 



36 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



Courses IV. and V. have been arranged for the benefit 
of those students who, for reasons satisfactory to them- 
selves, are unable to continue at college four years and 
take one of the regular degree courses. 

Students who complete either of these two year courses 
will, on passing a satisfactory examination, receive certifi- 
cates indicating their attainments. 

Those who have completed the general course in each 
department of the school of Mechanic Arts, and are quali- 
fied, can enter upon a more extended technical course in 
Mechanical Engineering. 

»'.-■■ j . . 

PREPARATORY COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

Students who expect to become practical pharmacists 
can enter upon a special course of Chemistry and Natural 
History and occupy all their time in the laboratories of 
these departments, under the immediate direction of the 
professors. Wi'h the excellent facilities offered in the 
chemical and botanical laboratories, scientific preparation 
of great value to the practical pharmacist can be obtained. 

COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

Students who have received the degree of B. Sc. in En- 
gineering, or who have prosecuted an equivalent course of 
study, can enter upon a special course of Mining Engineer- 
ing, which includes the following subjects of study, and will 
require a residence of one year : 

Industrial Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of Ores, 
Mineralogy, Economic Geology, Mining Machinery, Drift- 
ing, Tunnelling, Timbering, Ore Dressing, and the various 
Operations connected with the exploitation of mines. 

This course of study will be under the charge of the 
Professors of Chemistry, Engineering and Natural His- 
tory. 



< 



l 



(*) It is designed to equip the Physical Laboratory- for regular work next session 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

SPECIAL ONE YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



87 



Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study Agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class 
under the Professor of Agriculture, and will be excused from reciting 
in any other class, frcin military duty, and from all other college 
duties;' but will be under the general college regulations, and will be 
required to have their time fully occupied. 

They can attend the lectures in Agriculture in all the classes, and 
engage in the practical work at the experimental station, in the field, 
stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard and vineyard, etc., and may thus, in 
one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of Scientific Agri- 
culture. 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature 
in the courses of education provided for. the students of 
this College, and as far as possible all students are required 
to enter upon laboratory work in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given in 
the following departments : 

I. — Chemistry. 

II.— Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, etc. 
III. — Agriculture. 
IV.— Botany. 
V. — Mineralogy. 
VI. — Biology. 
VI I.— Technical Drawing. 
VIII. — Mechanic Arts. 
(*)IX.— Physics. 



■% * <v 



38 



Agricultural and Mechanical Collegf. 



I— COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week 

FOURTH CLASS. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 



Third Term. 



5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2 History . 

5. Mathematics. 6. Mathematics. 

3. Elem'tary Physiology. 2. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 



THIRD CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 

SECOND CLASS. 



Third Term. 

2. English. 

3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 



3. English. 3. 

3. Physics. 3. 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. 
2. Agriculture. 2. 

4. Natural History (lab'y) 4. 

1. Military Tactics. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 

3. Military Drill. 3. 

(a) Beurins March 1st. 



Second Term. 

English. 3 # 

Physics. 3, 

Industrial Chemistry. 3. 
Agriculture. 2. 

Natural History(lab'y) 4. 
Military Tactics. l. 

Chemical Laboratory. 9. 
Practical Agriculture. 2. 
Military Drill. 3 



Third Term. 

English. 

Physics. 

Industrial Chemistry. 

Agriculture. 

Natural History (lab'y) 

Military Tactics, 

Chemical Laboratory. 

Practical Agriculture. 

Military Drill, 




a ,.*"»# 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



39 



First Term. 



FIRST CLASS. 



Second Term. 



2. English Literature. 

2. Mental Science. 

2. Physics. 

4. Natural History. 

2. Agriculture. 

2. Agricult'ral Chemistry 2. 

1. Military Science. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 



2. 
2. 
2. 
4. 
2. 



Political Economy. 
Moral Science. 
Astronomy. 
Natural History. 
Agriculture. 
Agricult'ral Chemistry 2. 
Military Science. 1. 

Chemical Laboratory. 9. 
Practical Agriculture. 2. 



2. 
2. 
2. 
4. 
2. 



Third Term. 

Political Economy. 
Moral Science. 
Asti onomy . 
Natural History. 
Biology. 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Military Science. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Practical Agriculture. 



H._COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 



First Term. 



FOURTH CLASS. 

Second Term. 



5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 5; Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. El. Physiology. 



3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 



3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture (a). 
3. Drawing. 



3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 
THIRD CLASS. 

Second Term. 



3. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 

2. English. 

3. Botany. 

5. Mathematics. 



3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture (a). 3. Agriculture (a). 

3. Drawing. 



3. Drawing. 
6. Me~cna~nic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

(a) For Agriculture may be substituted French or German or work in the Chemical Labo- 
ratory. 



<ZoW^ 










40 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



First Term. 

3. English or French. 
8. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 

4. Lab'y, Mineralogy. 
4. Field Work, EnginV 
3. Military Drill. I 



First Term. 



8ECOND CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English or French. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 

4. Lab'y, Mineralogy. 
4. Field Work, Engin'g. 
3. Military Drill. 

FfRST CLASS. 



Third Term. 

3. English or French. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Field Work, Engin'g. 
3. Military Drill. 



2. English Literature (b). 2 
2. Physics. 

2. Natural History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Science. 

Field Work, Engin'g. 



2. 
2. 
3. 
5. 
5. 
1. 



Second Term. 

Political Economy (b). 
Astronomy. 
Natural History. 
Mathematics. 
Engineering. 
Drawing. 
Military Science. 
Field Work, Engin'g. 



Third Term. 

2. Political Economy (b). 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 
Field Work, Engin'g. 



III.— GENERAL COI7KSE. 

■ 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 



FOURTH CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 
2. History. 
5. Latin. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

4. Latin. 
6. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 



3. Drawing. 
6. Mechanic i Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y, 2. Agriculture. 
3. Military Dnll. 3. Military Drill. 6 , Mechanic Irts. 

3. Military Drill. 

(b) For Eng. Lit. and Pol. Econ. may be substituted French or German. 



» » 




/*" 




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■«* * 



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* 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
v THIRD CLASS. 



41 



First Term. 



Second Term. 



Third Term. 



5. Latin. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 



4. Latin. 
3. Botany. 

5. Mathematics. 



5. Latin. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3, General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y« 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. Latin. 

2. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (a). 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

2. English Literature. 

2. Mental Science. 

2. Physics. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin * 

1. Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



SECOND CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. Latin. 

2. German 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (a). 

3. Military Drill. 

FIRST CLA«S. 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Moral Science. 

2. Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. Latin. 

2. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (a). 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Moral Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Natural History. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



(a) The student may elect 



English Thesis, 
the Laboratory of any department for which he may be qualified 









** «% f* 



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42 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



IV.—TWO YEARS' COURSE DT MECHANIC ARTS. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. . 
5. English. 



Fir* Term. second Term. Third Term. 

5. English. 5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2 . History. 2. History 

5. Mathematics 5. Mathematics. 6. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elem'tary Physiology. 2. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. & Drawing. 3 Drawing 

l' myl Mi n A n L8b ' y - 6 - Mecha ^ Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

o. Military Drill. \ri it#— twi « •..,. 



^«>«< Term. 
3. English. 
0. Mathematics. 
3. Physic**. 
3. Drawing. 



3. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 



3. Military Drill. 



5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



V.-TWO YEARS' COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 
5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
5. Agriculture. 

12. Practical Agriculture. 
3. Military Drill. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. tlistory. 

5. Mathematics. • 

3. Elem'tary Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
• 5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

5. Agriculture. 
12. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 

2. Hi9tory. 

6. Mathematics. 
& Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry, 
0. Agriculture. 
12. Practical Agriculture. 
3. Military Drill. 



I 







I 



I 



\ 



SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES. 






HOURS. 



I. 

l8-9 



II. 
9—IO 



III. 
IO-II 



MONDAY. 



4. Algebra. 

3. Latin. 
2. French. 
U2. Drawing. 

4. Mech. Arts. 



4. English. 

3. Chemistry. 
2. Engineering. 

1. Calculus. 
1. French. 

4. Mech. Arts. 



MONDAY. 



3. English. 
2. Physics. 
1. German. 
I. Engineering. 
1. Biology. , 



TUESDAY. 



4. Geometry. 
3. Latin. 
2. German. 
1 a 2. Drawing. 
2. Botany. 



WEDNESDAY. 



4. Algebra. 

3. Latin. 
2. French. 

1 a 2. Drawing. 
2. Practical Agr. 

4. Mech. Arts. 



THURSDAY. 



4. Geometry. 
3. Latin. 
2. German. 
1 a 2. Drawing. 
2. Botany. 



FRIDAY. 



4. Algebra. 

3. Latin. 
2. French. 

1 a 2. Drawing. 
2. Practical Agr. 

4. Mech. Arts. 
1. Biology. 



SATURDAY. 



Exercises in Elocution. 



5: 



-* 
- 



4. History. 
3. Agriculture. 
2. Engineering 
2. Botany. 
1. Physics. 



4. English. 

3. Chemistry. 

2. Engineering. 

1. Calculus. 

1. French. 

4. Mech. Arts. 

2. Practical Agr. 



4. History. 
3. Agriculture. 
2. Engineering. 
2. Botany. 
1. Physics. 



4. English. 
3. Chemistry. 
2. Engineering. 
1. Biology. 
1. Calculus. 

1. French. 

2. Latin. 

4 Mech. Arts. 
2. Practical Agr. 



Military Drill. 






TUESDAY. 



3. History (1.2). 

3. Botany (2.3). 
2. Agriculture. 
2. Latin. 

1. Engineering. 

4. English. 



WEDNESDAY. 



3. English. 
2. Physics. 
1. German. 
1. Engineering. 
1. Biology. 



THURSDAY. 



3. History XI. 2). 

3. Botany (2. 3). 
2. Agriculture. 
2. Latin. 

1. Engineering. 

4. English. 



FRIDA*Y. 



3. English. 
2. Physics. 
1. German. 
1. Engineering. 



SATURDAY. 



4. Mech. Arts. 1 Sec. 

3. Mech. Arts. 2 Sec. 

1.2. Machine Work. 
Laboratory. 
Field Work, Eng'ng. 



9 






• 


4. Physics (1). 




4. Physics (1). 


- 


4. Physics (1). 






4. Physiology (2). 


4. Mechanic Arts 1 Sec 


4 Physiology (2). 


4. Mechanic Arts 1 Sec 


4. Physiology (2). 






4. Agriculture (3). 




(4. Latin. 

14. Agriculture (3). 




4. Agriculture (8). 




IV. 


4. Latin. 


4. Latin. 


4. Latin. 


4. Latin. 




3. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 


3. Agriculture (1. 2). 


3. Agriculture (3). 


3. Drawing. 


4. Mech Arts 1 Sec. 




2. Mathematics. 


2, Mathematics. 


2. Mathematics. 


2. Mathematics. 


2. Mathematics. 


3. Mech. Arts 2 8ec. 


1 I— 12 


2. Chemistry. 
1. English (J), 
1. Political 


1. Chemistry. 


2. Chemistry. 
1. English (1). 


1. Chemistry. 


2. Chemistry. 


1 A 2. Machine Work. 
Field Work, Eng'ng. 




1, Latin. 


1. Political 






Laboratory 




Economy (2.3). 




Economy (2. 3). 


1. Latin. 


1. Military Science. 




V. 


■ ■ ■ 

4. Drawing. 


4. Mechanic Arts 1 Sec 


4. Drawing. 


4. Mechanic Arts lSec 


4. Drawing, 


Mechanic.il Arts. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 






2. English. 


2. English. ■ 


1. Mental Science. 


2. English. 


]. Mental Science. 




13— I 




1. Geology. 




1. Geology. 


v 




I». M. 


MONDAY. 


TUESDAY. 


WEDNESDAY. 


THURSDAY. 


FRIDAY. 


SATURDAY. 




4. Mech. Arts 2 Sec. 


3. Mech. Arts 


4. Mech. Arts 2 Sec. 


• 

3. Mech. Arts 


4. Mech. Arts 2 Sec. 






3. Mech. Arts 1 Sec. 


2d A 3d Sec. 




2. i A 3d Sec. 






VI VII 




2. Mineralogy 


3 Mech. Arts 1 Sec. 


2. Mineralogy 


3. Mech. Arts 1 Sec. 


r 


3. Field Work Agr. 


Laboratory. 


3. Field Work Agr. 
Ia2 LaboratoryCnem 


laboratory. 


3. Field Work Agr. 
1*2. LaboratoryCnem 




2-4 


1 a 2. Laboratory. 
1 a 2. Field Work 


2. Mech. Arts. 


1.2 Mech. Arts. 






Exer's in Elocution. 




1&2. Field Work 






Eng'ng. 


Military DriU.(*) 


1 a 2. Field Work 


Military Drill.(*) 


Eng'ng 
Exer's in Elocution. 






• 




Eng'ng. 







Chapel services daily at 7.50 a. m. 

Numbers prefixed denote classes, affixed.(l), (2), (3) denote' terms. 

•From 4.30 to 5- 30 p, m. 






2 



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DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

PRESIDENT BROUN. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text-books 
and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The first part 
of the course is occupied with Elementary Rational 
Mechanics, treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of Molecular 
Mechanics ; while due prominence is given to principles, 
frequent reference is made to the applications of science. 

The studies of the second class include the properties of 
matter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kinematics, 
kinetics, mechanic powers, friction, pendulum, molecular 
forces of solids, liquids and gases, theory of undulations, 
heat, electricity, magnetism, etc. 

The studies of the first class include Electricity and its 
applications; Optics, Astronomy and Meteorology. 

Text-Book?.— In Physics, Atkinson's Ganot. In Astronomy, 
Young. 

MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. SMITH. 

The general course for the first two years embraces the 
first year, Algebra and Geometry, six books ; second year, 
Solid Geometry, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Sur- 
veying, Mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained: First, mental 
discipline ; second, a thorough knowledge of the princi- 
ples of pure mathematics and their practical applications. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given in the 
third class in farm, town and government land surveying, 
dividing land, mapping, plotting and computing of areas, 
etc.; also in the theory, adjustment itod use of instruments. 












Agricultural and Mechanical College. 47 

The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to field 
practice. 

* 

Mensuration includes an extended course in measure- 
ments of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and 
curvilinear figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students T 
lays thefoundation for the pure and applied Mathematics 
of the Mechanical and Engineering course. Analytical 
Geometry, Descriptive Geometry and Calculus are pur- 
sued in the Engineering course. Especial attention is 
given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is 
supplemented by lectures. Solutions of original practical 
problems are required of the student, to make him fa- 
miliar with the application of principles and formulae. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Schuyler's Survey- 
ing, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, Waldo's Descriptive Ge- 
ometry, Taylor's Calculus, Olney's and Wentworth's Trigonometry. 

NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. 

PROF. MELL. 

Geology. — This subject is studied in the senior class, and 
extends through the entire session. Special attention is 
given to the geology of Alabama, and many illustrations 
are drawn from the coal and iron fields and other natural 
deposits of mineral in the State. The origin of ore deposits, 
mineral springs and geological relations of soils are care- 
fully studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical 
Geology for the post-graduate students. This subject is 
pursued by applicants for degrees of Master of Science and 
Mining Engineering. 

The second class in Engineering spend two terms in Min- 
eralogy and blow-pipe work. 






48 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Botany. — The students of the third class begin the study 
of Botany the first of March and continue it through the 
session. Analytical work is made an important feature. 
This class is provided with plants from the neighboring 
fields, and taught how to determine their specific names. 
The work is sufficiently exhaustive to enable the student, 
after completing the course, to name any of the ordinary 
weeds and grasses that he will encounter in this section. 
All students of the third class are required to study 
Botany, 

In the second class, in the course of Chemistry and Agri- 
culture, an amount of time is devoted to systematic and 
structural Botany, and to advanced laboratory work with 
the microscope in the preparation of specimens showing 
plant structure ; this work is sufficient to familiarize the 
students with the methods of plant building and cellular 
organization. Excellent microscopes of the most improved 
patterns, and all the necessary chemicals and apparatus 
for preparing and mounting vegetable tissues, are used by 
the students. A dark room is attached to this laboratory 
for micro-photographic work. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Le Conte's Geology, Gray's Botany, Dana's Mineralogy, Goodale's 
Physiological Botany, Nelson's Herbarium and Plant Descriptions. 

ALABAMA WEATHER SERVICE. 

The United States Signal Service has established in Ala- 
bama a State system for collecting meteorological data 
relating to climatic changes. The service is now in suc- 
cessful operation with the central office located at this In- 
stitute. Bulletins are issued at the close of each month 
compiled from reports sent the Director from numerous' 
stations scattered throughout the State. An opportunity 
is thus offered the students in Meteorology of becoming 
familiar with the system so long successfully operated by 
the Department at Washington. 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 49 

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

PROF. LANE. 
CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies of this department begin in the sec- 
ond class, and require a good knowledge of Algebra, 
Geometry, Trigonometry and Analytical Mechanics. They 

are as follows : 
Second class. — Sim pie, compound, reversed and parabolic 

curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting 
dope stakes, location and construction of common roads 

and railroads. 

First class.— Classification, appearances, defects, season- 
ing, durability and preservation of timber ; classification 
and description of natural building stones ; bricks and con- 
cretes ; cast and wrought iron, steel and other metals ; 
limes, cements, mortars and their manufacture ; paints and 
other preservatives ; classification of strains and a general 
mathematical discussion of the same; joints and fasten- 
ings; solid and open built beams; classification, construc- 
tion and mechanics of masonry; foundations on land and 
in water; bridges and roofs of different kinds; their con- 
struction and strains determined mathematically and 
graphically ; common roads, their coverings, location and 
construction ; location and construction of railroads ; navi- 
gable, irrigation, and drainage canals ; river and sea-coast 
improvements. Theory and practice are combined in both 
classes. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 
Second Class.— Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers, Gilles- 
pie's Roads and Railroads, Parson's Track. 

First Class.— Wheeler's Civil Engineering, Von Ott's Graphic 

' StaticS * DRAWING. 

All of the students of the third and fourth classes are 
required to take Drawing; but only the student in 
Mechanics and Engineering in the first and second classes. 







50 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



The fourth class is taught linear and free-hand drawing. 
The third class is instructed in the principles of ortho- 
graphic and isometric p rojections, shade and shadows,, 
practical, perspective and tinting. In the second class the 
instruction embraces a more extended course in ortho- 
graphic and isometric drawing, perspective, shades and 
shadows and tinting; also sketches of tools and machines,, 
plans, elevations and cross-sections of buildings and blue 
prints. The first class makes topographical drawings, and 
drawings of machines, roofs, bridges, etc., to different 
scales and blue prints. Plans, profiles and sections of 
railroad surveys complete the instruction in this depart, 
ment. 

< TEXT-BOOKS. 

Fourth Class.-Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thome'*. 
Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model Draw- 

Third Class.-Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical Per- 
spective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. ' 

Second Clasa^Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's 
Drawing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the Colege 
Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. "^ouege, 

First Class -French.. English and American Plates belonging to the 
College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. g g 

AGRICULTURE. 

PKOP. NEWMAN. 

The course of instruction in this department embraces : 
L, so.ls ; II, plants ; III., domestic animals. In the fourth 
class twenty lectures, covering the third term of the ses- 
sion, treat of soils, their classification, physical defects and 
remedies, causes of diminished fertility, and the means 
used to protect them from waste and restore fertility, the 
theory and practice of surface and sub-drainage, etc The 

J&t? i wi nr h] reference to k^ 

classes of so,l m Alabama, omitting as far as possibl^ 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 51 

questions involving a knowledge of Chemistry and Botany 
— subjects not taught in the fourth class. 

In the third class, in addition to the discussion of the 
physical properties and mechanical treatment of soils, the 
methods of studying their chemical defects and their 
remedies are discussed. The sources of the important ele- 
ments of plant food, ?ind their use upon different soils and 
plants, the restoration of humus, saving home manures, 
composts, commercial fertilizers, the office of different 
chemical elements in plant development— the relations of 
plant growth to soil and atmosphere, the theory and prac- 
tice of restoration of crops, terracing and grading to pre- 
vent washing, plows and plowing—indeed everything 
connected with tilling the soil passes under review as 
foundation work. 

Southern agriculture is then treated in the concrete— 
the historv, nature and cultivation of each of our field 
crops discussed as regards their adaptation to and treat- 
ment upon the soils of Alabama. This occupies the first 
and second terms. The third term is devoted to domestic 
and commercial horticulture, poultry, sheep, cattle-breed- 
ing and management of the dairy, etc. In the second 
class stock breeding and management is completed, and 
a thorough course in pomology, including the propaga- 
tion of nursery stock, planting, manuring, pruning, culti- 
vating, harvesting and marketing every species of fruit, 
treated theoretically and practically, occupies the re- 
mainder of the session. Barry's Fruit Garden, corrected 
for our latitude, is used in this class. In the senior class 
a series of lectures is delivered upon political economy in 
its special relations to the pursuit of agriculture and the 
relations of capital and labor devoted to agriculture ; the 
selection, purchase, equipment and management of a farm, 
the ratio between fixed and working capital, the employ- 
ment and management of labor, etc., etc. The science of 
cattle feeding occupies the second term, and landscape 




V 



52 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

gardening, treated with special reference to the improve- 
ment of country homes, occupies the remainder of the 

session. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROP. LUPTON. ASSISTANT, L. W. WILKINSON. 

Instruction in this department embraces--* 

1. A course of lectures in General Chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in Industrial Chemistry, 

3. A course of lectures in Agricultural Chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with each 
course of lectures, for the practice of chemical analysis and 

chemical research. 

1. Course in General Chemistry: This consists of a series 

of lectures (three per weelr) extending throughout the en- 
tire session, and includes a discussion of the fundamental 
principles of Chemical Philosophy in connection with the 
history, preparation, properties and compounds of the 
metallic and non-metallic elements, with the main facts 
and principles of Organic Chemistry. In this course the 
more common applications of Chemistry to the Arts and 
Manufactures are discussed. The apparatus used for 
experimental illustration is extensive, containing the 
newest and most approved instruments necessary for pre* 
senting the subject in the most attractive and instructive 
form. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

* Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cook's 
Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. The lectures on Industrial Chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion in 
detail of the processes and chemical principles involved in 
the most important applications of Chemistry in the Arts 
and Manufactures to the reduction of ores, the preparation 
of materials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, heat- 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



53 



iy* 



; 



ing, illumination, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, 

etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suit- 
able specimens of raw materials and manufacturing pro- 
ducts, together with models and diagrams. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Wagner's Chemical Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as applied 
to Arts and Manufacturing, TJre's Dictionary, Watt's Dictionary, 
Richardson and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy. 

3. Course in Agricultural Chemistry : This consists of 
lectures on Chemistry in its applications to Agriculture 
(two per week), and includes a thorough discussion of the 
origin, composition and classification of soils, the composi- 
tion and growth of plants, the sources of plant food and 
how obtained, the improvement of soils, the manufacture 
and use of fertilizers, the chemical principles involved in 
the rotation of crops, the feeding of live stock and the 
various operations carried on by the intelligent and suc- 
cessful agriculturist. 

BOOKS OF REFERENCE. 

Lupton's Elementary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson 
and Cameron's Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agricul- 
ture in relation with Chemistry, Scientific Journals, Reports of the 
United States Department of Agriculture, and the bulletins and reports 
of the various home and foreign Agricultural Departments and Sta- 
tions. 

4. The Course of systematic Laboratory Work: This 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried on in 
connection with each course of lectures, and embraces the 
practical operation of chemical analysis and synthesis, be- 
in* varied somewhat to suit the individual object of the 

student. 

The laboratories, which are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p. m. 
during six days 'in the week, are amply supplied with 
everything necessary for instruction in chemical manipula- 



■ 



54 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

tion, in the qualitative and quantitative analysis of soils, 
fertilizers, minerals, mineral waters, technical products, 
etc., and in the method of prosecuting chemical researches. 
Unusual facilities are offered to students who wish to devote 
their time to the special study of practical chemistry. 

Each student on entering the Chemical Laboratory is 
furnished with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles, and 
the common re-agents and apparatus used in qualitative 
and quantitative analysis. At the close of the session he 
will be credited with such articles as may be returned in 
good order; the value of those which have been injured 
or destroyed will be deducted from the deposit. 

BOOKS USED. 

In Qualitative Analysis— Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In Quantitative Analysis— Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, 
Rickett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. 

In Agricultural Chemical Analysis— Church, Frankland. Official 
methods of the Association of Agricultural Chemists. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

(For description of the building, see page 11.) 

The Chemical Apparatus recently purchased for the new laboratory 
consists of a full supply of the latest and most approved instruments 
for practical work and investigation. The building is supplied with 
water and gas and every appliance required to meet the demands of 
modern scientific instruction and research. In addition to the appa- 
ratus usually supplied to first-class laboratories, a new and improved 
Schmidt and Hansen's Folariscope has been imported, two short-arm 
Becker Balances of latest pattern, Bunsen Spectroscope, Zeiss' Micro- 
scope, and other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 

ENGLISH AND LATIN. 

PROF. THACH. 
ENGLISH. 

In this department the students are carried through a 
systematic course of study in the English Language and 
literature In the courses of study which do not include 



I — «-M«i 



^mm 



■ 



^ — — - — — 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



55 



the ancient classics, a full course in English is especially 
important. It is therefore designed,, as much as the time 
allotted permits, to familiarize these students by frequent 
exercises with the standard authors of the language. 

The course of study is as follows: 

Fourth Class.— Five hours a week ; study of grammar? 
the principles of special and general composition, with fre- 
quent brief papers illustrating the laws studied. . 

Whitney's Essentials, Lockwood's Lessons in Rhetoric. 

Third Class.— Three hours a week; study of style, analy- 
sis of selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on 
literary and historic themes. 

Genung's Rhetoric, Scudder's American Poems, Abbott's How to 
Write Clearly. Weekly exercises in declamation are required of this 
-class. 

Second Class.— Three hours a week ; critical study of 
English Classics, History of English and American Liter- 
ature, Logic, Essays. 

Shaw's History of English Literature, Abbott's English Lessons, 
Hale's Longer English Poems. 

First Class.— Two hours a week, first term. Principles 
of criticism and study of English Classics; second and 
third terms, Political Economy. Two hours a week, first 
and second terms, Meutal Science; third term, Moral 

Science. 

Shakespeare's Plays, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Wayland's Science 
of Wealth, Hickok's Mental Science, Gregory's Christian Ethics. 

Three original orations are required during the year of each student 
in the first and second classes. 

LATIN. 

The subjects taught in this department are the Latin 
Xanguage and Literature. 

The modes of instruction are by translation from the 
Latin texts into English and from English into Latin. 






56 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



The constant use of black-boards adds much to the prog- 
ress and accuracy of the student. 

A systematic course of exercises, illustrative of the 
principles of Latin etymology and syntax, is carried on in 
connection with the reading of the authors prescribed. 
Special attention is given to English derivatives from the 
Latin, and to the corresponding idioms of the two lan- 
guages. 

The progress of the student is valued not so much by 
the number of books read, as by his ability to read Latin 
and explain the principles of interpretation and con- 
struction. ; 

Latin author read : 

Fourth Class.— Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Grammar and Composition. 
Third Olass.— Cicero's Composition. 

Second Class.— Tacitus, Horace, Selections from Latin poets and 
Prose writers, Classical Literature. 

First Class.— Cicero's Tuscuhui Disputations, Terence, History of 
Latin Literature. 

MECHANIC ARTS. 

G. H. BRYANT, B. 8. INSTRUCTOR. 
J. J. WILMORJCj_B. A. BLAKKY, ASSISTANTS. 

The course in Manual Training covers three years, as 
follows : First year, wood-working— carpentry and turn- 
ing ; second year, pattern-making and foundry and forge 
work— moulding, casting and smithing; third year, ma- 
chine shop-chipping and filing and machine work in 
metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the three 
lower classes (5th, 4th and 3d). For satisfactory reasons 
a student may be excused from this laboratory work bv 
the Faculty. J 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in 
three exercises of two hours each. 



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OF 

MECHANIC ARTS 

ALA. POLY! IN4T* 

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A WORKBENCHES 
BAND SAW 
C SCROLL SAW 
PATTERN LATHE 
£ CIRCULAR SAW 
P CRIHOSTONB 
G BUZ7>PLANER 
H SURFACE ff 
J Dff/Li. PflfWS 
K t/LI/va BENCHES 
L ENGINE LATHES 
M BENCH GRINDER. 
N TOOL »• 
POflTDR/LL 
P SHAPEft 
ft PLANER 

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SHAFT LINES 
BENCHES 



SPEED LATHE 
MILLING MACHINB 
ENGINE 
DYNAMO 
MOULOJNO flEJVCHfffl 

CUPOLA 

BRASS FURNA€& 

FORGES 

ANVILS 

WOOD LATHEB 

BLOWERS 

HEATER 

PUMP 

BOILEH 

CLOSET* 

SINKS. 




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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 57 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 
from a twenty-five horse power Harris-Corliss automatic engine, which 
is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel horizontal tubular 
boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the feed water form a part of 
the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial, brick boiler- 
house and chimney have been erected. 

The equipment for the wood-working shop comprises the following : 
20 double wood-working benches, each with complete set of carpenter's 
tools ; 20 turning-lathes, 10-inch swing, each with complete set of tools ; 
1 double circular saw ; 1 band saw ; 1 board-planing machine ; 1 buzz 
planer ; 2 scroll saws (power) ; 1 large pattern-maker's lathe, 16-inch 
swing ; 1 36-inch grindstone. In addition to these, the tool-room is sup- 
plied with a variety of extra hand-tools for special work. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of moulding-benches for 12 
students, each supplied with a complete set of moulder's tools ; a 14- 
inch cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of melting 1,000 
pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace in which can be melted 100 
pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, etc. Also a 
full supply of ladles, large and small moulding flasks, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 16 hand-forges of new pattern, 
each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast for all the forges 
is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower (which also 
furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No. 15 Sturtevant ex- 
haust blower draws the smoke from the fires into the smoke-flues and 
forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine tools in the machine department are as follows : 6 en- 
gine-lathes (screw- cutting), 14-inch swing, 6-foct bed ; 2 engine-lathes, 
16-inch swing (one with taper attachment) ; 1 speed lathe, 10-inch 
swing; 1 20-inch drill-press (power-feed); 1 15-inch shaper; 1 22-inch 
x 22-inch x 5 foot friction planer; 1 universal milling machine; 1 
corundum tool-grinder (14-inch wheel); 1 bench grinding-machine 
(small); 1 post drill press (14-inch). A part of this room is set apart 
for vise- work -chipping and filing— and benches for 12 students are 
provided, each with vise and sets of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In 
the tool-room is to be found a good supply of machinists' tools for 
general shop use, such as lathe and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, 
dies, gauges, files, cutting and measuring tools, and special appliances 
for machine work, etc. 

The nature of the work in each department is as follows: 

1st ybar. 

I. A course of carpentry (hand work covering the first 
term and part of the second, or about five months). 






I 






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58 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



The lessons include instruction on the nature ancKuse 
of tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, element- 
ary work with plane, saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, 
timber-splices, cross joints, mort e and tenon, mitre and 
frame work, dovetail work, comprising different kinds of 
joints used in cabinet making, light cabinet work, ex- 
amples in building, framing, rooftrusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning, extending through the three 
months of the third term. The lessons comprise, first, 
nature and use of lathe and tools, plain straight turning 
caliper work to different diameters and lengths, simple 
and compound curves, screw plate and chuck-work, hol- 
low and spherical turning. 

2d year. 

I. A course in pattern-making, covering the first half 
of the first term. The work includes a variety of ex- 
amples of whole and split patterns, core work, etc., giving 
the >tudents familiarity with the use of patterns for gen* 
eral moulding. 

II. A course in moulding and casting in iron and brass 
occupying ten weeks. The work consists for the most part 
of small articles, such as light machine parts, but a suf- 
ficient variety of forms are introduced for the student to 
acquire a good general and practical knowledge of the 
usual methods and appliances used in light foundry work. 
Most of the work is in green sand in two part flasks ; core 
work is also given, and some three-part flask and some 
dry sand work is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made 
by students are used, besides special patterns for occa- 
sional larger or more complicated work. Instruction and 
practice is given in working the cupola, each student in 
turn taking charge of a melting 

III. A course in forge work in inland steel occupying 



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VIEWS OF MACHINE ROOM, 

LABORATORY OF MECHANIC ARTS. 



111 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 59 

the remainder of the year. The lessons are arranged so 
that the students, in making the series of objects, become 
famihar with the nature of the metals and the successive 
steps in working them by hand into simple and complex 
forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, 
welding by various methods, tool-forging, tempering, 
hardening, etc. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of 
lectures is given on the metallurgy and working of the 
metals used in the industrial arts, cast and wrought iron, 
steel, brass, etc. 

3d yeak. 

I. A course in chipping and filing covering the first 
term. The lessons comprise work on cast and wrought 
iron; chipping to line on flat and curved surfaces, key- 
seating, etc.; filing and finishing to line (straight and 
curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, slotting, dove- 
tail work, sliding and tight fits, sawing, pin, screw and 
key filing, surface finishing with-scraper, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the year. 
The work includes cast and wrought iron, steeJ and brass: 
Turning to various diameters and lengths, taper turning, 
facing with chuck and face plate, drilling— both in lathe • 
and drill press— reaming, boring, screw cutting in lathe 
and with taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc., with planer 
and shaper, milling various forms with the milling ma- 
chine, fitting, grinding, polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various sub- 
jects connected with machine work in metals: Such as 
forms, construction and use of the various machines, cut- 
ting tools, gearing, gauges, screw threads, etc. During 
the last term some piece of construction work is given, 
the classes. 

Instruction is generally given, first, by black-board 
drawings or sketches which the student copies, wilh di. 



*■ 



60 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 




mensions in note-book, with which each one provides 
himself; thus each one works from his own notes, this 
is supplemented, whenever necessary, by the actual con 
struction of the lesson by the instructor before the cla 
second by inspection and direction at the bench by t 
instructor. 

Students desiring to pursue the study of applied me- 
chanics beyond the above course will take a special course 
of Steam and Mill Engineering, supplemented by experi- 
ment and practice with the apparatus, including steam 
generation and the forms, construction and use of ste?im- 
boilers and accompanying apparatus, ; steam as a motive 
power, and forms, construction and use of the steam 
engine, with the study and use of the indicator : trans 
mission of power-shafting, belting, gearing, etc.; also 
elementary theoretical mechanism. 

\ 
BIOLOG5T. 

PROFESSOR ATKINSON. 

Elementary Biology. Three lectures a week during 
the second term will be given to the fourth class upon the 
elementary principles of biology. The course will include 
a discussion of the fundamental physiological properties 
of animal and plant life. The lectures will be supple- 
mented by experiments, demonstrations and microscopic 
illustrations before the class. 

Practical Biology. This subject is presented by lec- 
tures twice a week to the senior students in Agriculture 
and Chemistry.. The first part of the year will be devoted 
to the study of fungi, giving prominence to those which 
cause diseases of cultivated plants. This will be followed 
with the study of insects, including those injurious and 
beneficial to Agriculture. Special attention will be given 
to methods employed in combating the attacks of fungi 
and insects upon plants. 



4 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



61 



The reference books will be announced to the classes. 
The department contains a carefully selected library of 
the standard works on biology and many rare and valua- 
ble works, besides current periodicals adopted to aid in 
the special investigations carried on in the laboratory. 

MODERN LANGUAGES AND HISTORY. 

C. tf. BARNWELL, JR., ADJUNCT PROFESSOR. 
MODERN LANGUAGES. 

The following regular courses are given in French and 
German : 

French. — First Year: Three recitations a week. Du- 
ring this year the principal object is to acquire a thor- 
ough knowledge of the elements of grammar, and a cor- 
rect pronunciation, together with facility in translating 
ordinary French. Reading is begun at an early stage, 
and the principles of grammar are illustrated and im- 
pressed by frequent exercises in rendering English into 
French. 

Second Year: Three recitations a week. During this 
year, the same line of work^is pursued as that begun in 
the previous year. More difficult and varied French is 
read, and careful instruction is given upon the laws of 
grammar and the construction of the language. 

German.— Two Years: Two recitations a week the 
first year, three a week the second year. In this course 
the aim and the methods are similar to those in French. 

Special Courses.— In addition to these regular courses, 
additional classes are formed for special study in the lit- 
erature, or for special study in any particular direction 
desired, when the number of students desiring it is suffi- 
cient. 







^^™ 




62 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

French — First Year: Joynes-Otto's French Grammar and Intro- 
ductory Reader. 

Second Year : Supers French Reader, Jeanne d' Arc, and d'A vare* 
Heath's French Dictionary recommended. 

German— First Year: Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar, and 
Joynes' Reader. 

Second Year : Hauff 's Kara vane, Peter Schlemihl, Die Journalisten^ 
Heath's German Dictionary recommended. 

HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much to memo- 
rize facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is laid 
on the fact that History is not a succession of isolated 
facts, but a progressive whole, each event being at once 
the cause and the effect of other events. This causal 
relation of events is closely studied and the students are 
taught to investigate for themselves the growth of ideas, 
and to trace particularly their development in the United 
States, so as to acquire a practical knowledge of the 
history and present workings of our government and in- 
stitutions. The knowledge acquired is rendered clear 
arid permanent by frequent comparison of customs and 
laws, and also by diagrams, charts and maps. Instruction, 
is given by lectures and text-books. 

The course covers one year and a part of the next, and 
embraces the History of the United States, studies on our 
government and its institutions and on general history. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

First year: Johnston's U. S. History, and Swinton's "Outlines of 
the World's History." 

' Second Year: Myers' Mediaeval and Modern History. 



) 




gAricultural and Mechanical College, 
MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 



63 



LIEUT. J. B. McDONALD, U. S. ARMY, Commandant. 

Military Science and Tactics are required to be taught 
in this ipstitution by law. This law is faithfully carried 
out by imparting to each student, not physically incapac- 
itated to bear arms practical instructi6n in the School 
of the Soldier, of the Company and of the Battalion ; also 
in Guard Mountings, Inspections, Dress Parades, Re- 
views, etc. 

Under section 1225, U. S. Kevised Statutes, the. Col- 
lege is provided with modern Cadet rifles and accoutre- 
ments and two pieces of field artillery. Ammunition 
for practice firing is used under the direction of an expe- 
rienced officer. 

The following uniform of standard Cadet gray cloth 
has been prescribed for dress, viz.: Coats and pants as 
worn at West Point, with sack coat for fatigue, dark 
blue Cadet cap. A neat and serviceable uniform can 
be obtained here at $18. This is less expensive than the 
usual clothing. All students are required to wear this 
uniform during the session. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
The officers are selected for proficiency in drill, deport- 
ment and studies. Each company is officered by one 
Captain, two 1st Lieutenants, one 2d Lieutenant, and 
with a proper number of Corporals. The officers and 
non-commissioned officers are distinguished by appropri- 
ate insignia of rank. These appointments are confirmed 
by the President on nomination of the Commandant. 

The Second Class recites once a week in the United 
Stats Infan try Tactics. 

The First Class recites once a week in " Notes on Mili- 
tary Science." 



64 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 



There are three Post-Graduate Degrees— MASTER OF SCIENCE, 
MINING ENGINEER and CIVIL ENGINEER. 

A Post-Graduate D.egree may be obtained by a graduate 
of this College, or of any other institution of equal grade,. 
by one year's residence at the College, spent in the success- 
ful prosecution of a course of study in applied science pre- 
scribed by the Faculty. 

Candidates must also present to the Faculty a satis- 
factory thesis, showing independent investigation upon 
some subject pertaining to their course of study, and must 
pass a satisfactory examination on the course of studjr 
prescribed. The examination is written, and also oral, m 
presence of the Faculty. 

Applicants for Post-Graduate Degree are, by order of the^ 
Board, permitted to matriculate without payment of fees. 

They are subject to the general regulations as other 
students, but are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates, who are not candidates for a degree,. 
are permitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in 
any department of the College, except chemical labora- 
tory, without payment of regular fees. 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions are awarded in the different subjects of 
each class to those students whose grade for the entire 
year is above 90 per cent. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on 
Commencement day to those who obtain an average of 
90 per cent, in all the prescribed studies of a regular class r 
and also to those who obtain three distinctions in the 
fourth class, four in the third or second class, and five in 
the first class, provided they have satisfactorily passed all 
the regular examinations of that session. 



— ^-»-^"-^p 



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Agricultural and Mlchanical College. 
TOUR OF OBSERVATION. 



65 



At the close of the second term an opportunity will be 
given members of the senior class to inspect, under the 
supervision of a member of the Faculty, some of the mines, 
furnaces and manufactories of Alabama, accessible to the 

College. 

This inspection will prove an object lesson of value to 
students who have prosecuted studies allied to engineering. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are 
kept by the officers of instruction, in a form adapted to 
permanent preservation. 

From the record a monthly circular, or statement, is 
sent to the parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written recitations, or monthly examinations on the 
studies of the month, are held at the option of the pro- 
fessor. 

At the end of each term written or oral examinations, 
or both, are held on the studies passed over during that 

term. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the 
Faculty, and in no case will private examinations be per- 
mitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final 
examination, can be promoted to full standing to the next 
higher class only on satisfactory examinations at the open- 
ing of the next session. 

It is required that every student who enters the Col- 
lege shall remain through the examinations at the end of 
the term. Leaves of absence and honorable discharges 









) 












66 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

will, therefore, not be granted within six weeks of the 
examination, except in extreme cases. 
, Examinations for degrees or certificates of proficiency 
embrace the entire subject of study in the course. 

LIBRARY. 

A commodious room in the new building has been ap- 
propriated to the library. Having suffered severely by 
the fire, it now needs a large supply of books, and the hope 
is entertained that these will soon be provided. When this 
is done, it is designed to make it an important educational 
feature of the college. At present it has valuable refer- 
ence books and a limited number suitable for students. 
It is open daily, when students are permitted to select 
books under prescribed regulations. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the 
President and Faculty, in accordance with the code of laws 
and regulations enacted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study, and punctuality in attendance on 
recitations and all other duties, is required of every 
student. 

Students are not allowed to have in their possession 
weapons or arms not issued for the performance of mili- 
tary duty. 

MILITARY DRILL. 

There are three regular military drills each week, and all under- 
graduate students, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, are re- 
quired to engage in these exercises. 

The drills are short, and the duty involves no hardships. ' The mil- 
itary drill is a health-giving exercise, and its good effects in the 
development of the physique and improvement of the carriage of the 
Cadet are manifest. 

Privates of the first class may be excused by the President from all 
military drills, and also students over twenty-one years of age, who are 
permitted to matriculate and devote their time to one special studv 
as chemistry, agriculture, etc. 



■^ 



— M 



■^»» 



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< 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
RELIGIOUS SERVICE. 



67 



Religious services are held every morning in the 

chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and 
also to attend the church of their choice at least once on 

Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes 

every Sunday. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized, and through its 
weekly meetings exerts a wholesome Christian influence 
among the students of the College. 

The following students are the officers of the Associa- 
tion : 

W. G. Harrison, President. 

J. F. Wilkinson, Vice-President. 

D. Gillis, Corresponding Secretary. 

J. W. Bivins, Treasurer. 

LOCATION. 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, sixty 
miles east of Montgomery, on the line of the Western 

Railroad. . .- t . , 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general 
good health and freedom from malaria, having an elevation 
of eight hundred and twentyone feet above tidewater 
By statute of the State, the sale of spirituous liquors and 
keeping saloons of any kind are forbidden. 

THESIS. 

Each applicant for a degree is required to write and 
submit to the Faculty a thesis on a subject of immediate 



# 



I _ ii mm — — w 



68 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

relation to some study of his course, and deliver the same 
at Commencement, if required by the Faculty. 
This thesis must be given to the Professor of English 

by the first of May. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two Literary Societies connected with the 
College— the Wirt and Websterian. Each has a hall in 

the College building. 

These Societies hold celebrations on the evenings of 
Thanksgiving Day and the 22d of February, and also 
Commencement week. They elect annually, with the 
approval of the Faculty, an orator to represent them at 
the close of the year. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel 
services, oratorical exercises in declamation and in original 
orations are conducted by the Professor of English, in 
presence of the Faculty and students. 

The first and second terms the students of the third class 
are exercised in declamation. 

The second term the members of the second class deliver 
original orations. 

The third term the members of the first class read essays 
or deliver original orations. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The Annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the 
Society, is delivered in the chapel during Commencement 
week. The following are the officers of the Society : 

T. H. Frazer, M. D., President. 

J. 0. Street, Vice-President. 

C. 0. Thach, Treasurer and Secretary. 

The Alumni Oration will be delivered next Commence- 
ment by J. C. Street. 



w 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 69 

BOARDING. 

The College has no barracks or dormitories, and the 
students board with the families of the town of Auburn, 
and thus enjoy all the protecting and beneficial influences 

of the family circle. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it 
is to report those who, without permission, leave their 
rooms after the "call to quarters," or are guilty of any 

■violation of order. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not 
permitted to make changes without obtaining permission 

from the President. 

EXPENSES. 

Incidental fee, per half session * 2 JJ 

Library fee, per half session 

Surgeon's fee, per half session "T/",,, ftft 

Board per month, with fuel and lights $12 to 14 00 

These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and 
$6.00 on February 1st. By order of the Board no fees 

can be remitted. 

There is no charge for tuition. 

For students entering after January 1st, the fees for half 

session only are required. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be depos- 
ited by each student on matriculation, to cover any 
special or general damage to College property for which 

he may be liable. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent „ 

fee, or the unexpended balance, will be refunded to the 
student. 



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70 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
AMOUNT OF DEPOSIT. 



Each student on entering College should deposit with 
the Treasurer not less than $50.00, to pay the expenses 
of fees, one month's board, uniform, books, etc. 

UNIFORM. 

A uniform of Cadet gray cloth is prescribed which all 
undergraduate students are required to wear during the 
session. The uniforms are made at Auburn, of cloth 
manufactured at the Charlottesville mills. The suit, 
including cap, costs about $19.00; the dress coat $10.00 to 
$ 11.00. It is neat and serviceable and less expensive than 
ordinary clothing. 

SURGEON. 

The Surgeon is required to be present at the College 
daily, to visit the Cadets at their quarters who are re- 
ported sick, and to give all requisite medical attention 
without other charge than the regular Surgeon's fee, paid 
on entering College. 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the Treasurer of 
the College all funds desired for sons or wards, whether for regular 
charges of College fees or board, or for any other purpose. It is the 
duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed in his hands, and to 
pay all expenses incurred by the students, including board, uniform, 
books, etc., when approved. 

When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treasurer of 
the College by the cadet to pay his necessary expenses. These checks; 
are paid only when approved by the President. This approval is 
given only for necessary expenses, as stated in the Catalogue, unless; 
specially requested in writing by the parent. 

The attention of parents is called to the following law enacted bv 
the Trustees : J 

When a student matriculates, all money required to pay the College 
fees and other moneys in his possession must be deposited with the 
Treasurer, unless the President shall receive special instruction from 
the parent and guardian to the contrary. 



» 



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A 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 



71 



The Academic Year commences on Wednesday, 10th 
September (second Wednesday after first Monday), and 
ends on Wednesday, 10th June (the second Wednesday 
after the first Monday), which is Commencement day. 

It is divided into three term-. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the 23d of December ; 
the second term begins Jannary 1st and ends March 28th ; 
the third term continues from March 30th to the close of 
the session. 



RESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 
The following resolution was adopted by the Trustees : 

That in view of increased facilities for instruction in Apiculture 
and the technical departments of education now possessed by this 
College especially in the department of Mechanic Arts, made po»Ue 
ly the rece'nt donation from the State, the Facu ty are «*£"£» 
addition to the legal name of this College, to print on the Catalogue 
the woTd ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, as significant 
d the expanded system of practical instruction in industrial science 
in the course of education now provided for. 



DONATIONS TO MUSEUM. 
Valuable contributions have been made to the museum by the 

f tr W llbers n Lsburger, of Montgomery, a number of excellent 
spedmens of miners to be added to the Strassburger jJJ**^ 
The Smithsonian Institute, by the request ot Senator John T. Mor 
ffln fiftv-seven specimens of well selected minerals . 

g TkfSeplrtment of Agriculture, pressed and mounted specmens of 

^rTrSrter, of Montgomery, Ala., a specimen of quartz 

'T'jerome Cochran, of Montgomery, Ala., specimens of Indian 
rpli™ and sea-shells donated to the " Strassburger collection. 
S. GeSeH Lamar, specimens of crystalled gypsum from the 

West. 



' 



72 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



University of Alabama, a collection of fossils fij<fm the Tertiary of 

the State. 

Mr. Erskine Ramsay, mining engineer of the Pratt mines, speci- 
mens of diamond drill borings and coal specimens. 



DONATIONS TO LIBRARY. 

Smithsonian Institute, Reports, 4 vols. 

Chief of Engineers, Reports of Department, 2 vols. 

Secretary of Interior, Education, Coasts and Geodetic Survey, etc., 
42 vols. 

Hon. Jno. T. Morgan, Public Documents, 8 vols. 

Hon. James L. Pugh, Public Documents, 12 vols. 

Hon. W. C. Oates, Congressional Record, War of Rebellion, etc., 
10 vols. 



CALENDAR 1890-91. 

Session begins Wednesday, Sept. 10, 1890. 

Examination for admission ■ ....Wednesday, Sept. 10, 1890. 

First term begins .....Wednesday, Sept 10, 1890. 

First term ends Tuesday, Dec. 23, 1890. 

Second term begins Thursday, Jan 1, 1891. 

Second term ends Saturday, March 28. 1891. 

Third term begins Monday, March 30, 1891. 

Third class exercises Friday, May 1, 1891. 

Final examinations begin Monday, May 18, 1891. 

Commencement sermon ....Sunday, June 7, 1891. 

Annual meeting of Trustees Monday, June 8, 1891. 

Military exercises .^t:.,. Monday, June 8, 1891. 

Celebration of Literary Societies 8 p. m ...Monday, June 8, 1891. 

Second class celebration Tuesday, June 9, 1891. 

Alumni oration Tuesday, June 8, 1891. 

Address before Literary societies 8 p. m., Tuesday, 

[June 10, 1891. 
Commencement day Wednesday, June 10, 1891. 



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AGRICULTURAL 



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©Agricultural {Experiment Station. 



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COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION '. 

J. G. Gilchrist, 
R. F. Ligon, 
J. B. Mitchell. 



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BOARD OF DIRECTION— Ofpicbbs of the Station: 

W.L. Bboun Pre8ident ' 

J. S. Nbwhan ....Director and Agriculturist. 

N. T. Lupton Vice-Director and Chemist. 

,™ ^t tut Botanist. 

*P. H. Mell 

G. F. Atkinson..... I0 g 

ASSISTANTS. 

Isaac Boss, First Assistant Agriculturist in charge of Live Stock 
and Dairy. 

James Clayton Second Assistant Agricultural. 

J. T. Anderson, Ph. 1) .' First Assistant Chemist. 

L W. Wilkinson, M. So ••• Second Assistant Chemist. 

P. L. Hutchison, B. Sc Third Assistant Chemist. 

A. M. Lloyd, B. So... Assistant Botanist. 

♦Prof. Mell has also charge of Meteorological Observations. 



^^— — 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



WORK OF THE STATION. 



J. S. NEWMAN, Director and Agriculturist. 



The work of the year 1889 has been partly printed in eight bul- 
letins. 

Bulletin No. 3, January, 1889, reported experiments with corn, 
sweet patatoes, ground peas, turnips and grapes, analyses of fertili- 
zers, soils, feed stuffs, a continued classification and description of 
the woods of the State, and a meteorological report. 

Bulletin No. 4 contained practical instructions for the cultivation 
and management of strawberries, grapes and raspberries. 

Bulletin No. 5 contained experiments with fertilizers under cotton,. 
a comparison of the productiveness and general merits of different 
varieties of cotton, and an inquiry as to the needs of typical soils of 
the State. These were collected, soil and subsoil, placed under iden- 
tical circumstances, and treated with different elements and combina- 
tions of elements of plant food, and the response in the growth and 
productiveness of the cotton plants noted. » It also contained resulte- 
of experiments in pig feeding, description of barn and dairy, the re- 
port of experiments with different home products, as butter-producers 
analyses of soils, fertilizers and feed stuffs, and a report of the tem- 
perature of the soil at depths from one inch to ninety inches, and at- 
mospheric conditions and rainfall. 

Bulletin No. 6 embodied a report of the Botanist upon "grasses and 
their cultivation," with an account of their economic value as shown 
by their nutritive constituents found by chemical analyses. 

Bulletin No. 7 contained report of experiments with different spe- 
cies of vegetables, and their classification with reference to the merits- 
of the respective varieties ; resulte of some practical experiments with 
different methods of setting milk, and a comparison of the economy 
of the DeLaval separator with the Cooly system of creamery, with re- 1 
suits m favor of the DeLaval ; a report of the meteorological condi- 
tions, and a circular announcement of the Biologist, indicating the 
line of work to be pursued. 

Bulletin No. 8 contained a discussion of the formation and compo- 
sition of soils ; the composition of plants; the sources of phosphoric- 
acid, poteh and nitrogen employed in the manufacture of com- 
mercial fertilizers; the value and uses of several home manurta^- 
sources ; the manufacture of fertilizers ; the manipulation of com- 
posts ; analyses of commercial fertilizers and some natural guanos 



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Bulletin No. 9 consisted of a preliminary report of the investigations 
of nematode root-galls, the injury effected by them to certain culti- 
vated plants and noxious weeds, with some suggestions as [to means 
to be used to diminish the injurious effects of this insidious enemy. 

Bulletin No. 10 embodied a report of progress in grape culture upon 
the station grounds, including methods of preparing, fertilizing and 
cultivating the soil for this fruit, with a practical classification and de- 
scription of the varieties which have fruited during the last two years. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 



N. T. LUPTON. 



i 



1 



The working force in the Chemical Department consists of the 

chemist in charge and three assistants. In addition to the regular 

work in connection with the Station, this Department is charged with 

the chemical work of the State Department of Agriculture. This 

includes the analyses of such fertilizers, minerals and products of all 

description as, in the judgment of the Commissioner of Agriculture, 

are necessary for the development of the industrial resources of the 

State. 

ANALYSES MADE. 

Substances. No. op Samples. 

Acid phosphates with nitrogen and potash 171 

Acid phosphates with potash .'. 3 

Acid phosphates 58 

Natural phosphates 47 

Marls 11 

Miscellaneous substances... .1 48 

Feeding stuff 20 

Milk 76 

Butter 8 

Pea vines —•• 4 

Roots of pea vines ••• 4 

Soils • 9 

• Total 459 

Under the head of miscellaneous substances are included cotton- 
seed, cotton-seed meal, cotton-seed ash, kainit, muriate, nitrate, am- 
monia, sulphate, tankage, etc. _ 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



In addition to the quantitative work above mentioned, a large num- 
ber of mineralogical specimens, the character of which could be as- 
certained by simple qualitative tests, were examined and their values 
determined. 

A special bulletin was prepared during the year on commercial fer- 
tilizers. It embraced a brief discussion of the composition aDd for- 
mation of soils, their deterioration, the composition of plants, of com- 
mercial fertilizers, the sources of materials used in the manufacture 
of fertilizers, the estimation of commercial values, and the preparation 
of composts. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND 
METEOROLOGY. 



P. H. MELL. 



The work conducted in this department was of the following char- 
acter : 

I— A large number of species of grasses were collected during the 
summer and spring, analyzed and studied, and descriptions, with 
methods of cultivation, were published. 

Il.-Sections of the wooded plants of the State are being prepared 
and studies made of them. 

III.— During the year many experiments have been made on the 
cotton plant by means of the microscope and frequent field observa- 
tions. Twenty-three varieties were included in these investigations. 
A number of cross sections were made of the fibres, to determine the 
degree of maturity. Careful examinations were made, also, to deter- 
mine the effect produced upon the cellular structure of the plant by 
certain kinds of fertilization and cultivation ; to note, also, if any ma- 
terial difference actually existed between the various brands of cotton 
sold in the market under the many different names. 

IV.— Much material has been collected during the past year for a 
bulletin on "Noxious Weeds;" the work of examining and classify- 
ing these plants has been undertaken. 

V.-Daily observations of meteorological instruments, and on the 
changes of the atmosphere, have been carried on durin* the entire 
year. The meteorological outfit consists of the following instruments • 

1. Maximum thermometer. 

2. Minimum thermometer. 

3. Dry-bulb thermometer. 

4. Wet-bulb thermometer. 



$ 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



79 



5. Barometer. 

6. Anemoscope. 

7. Rain Gauge- 

8. Solar Radiator. 

9. Terrestrial Radiator. 

10. Thirty soil thermometers, ranging in depth from one to ninety- 
six inches. 

11. Anemometer, Robinson's make, with electric recording attach- 
ment. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY. 



GEORGE F. ATKINSON. 



ORQANizATioN.-The Department of Biology was organized during 
the latter part of the year. Owing to the necessity for the careful 
selection and importation of special apparatus and books, together 
with the fact that the suite of rooms for the biologist has but recently 
been in a condition for occupation, few investigations could be at 
tempted. There are four rooms in- the new building devoted to 
this department ; a suite of three rooms on the third floor, as follows : 
an office, laboratory room and lecture room, where subjects of practical 
interest are presented to the classes, and a room in the basement de- 
voted to the manipulation of coarser material from collections in pre- 
paring it for the laboratory and cabinet, and for special cultures. The 
work of furnishing these rooms. and mounting the special apparatus 

is in progress. , , , 

The office, besides the ordinary furniture, contains cases for an her- 
barium, where will be preserved specimens illustrating the fungi inju- 
rious to plants, and a cabinet illustrating the insects collected; also a 
well selected small library of special literature on these practical sub- 

J6C The more prominent pieces of apparatus in the laboratory are as 

follows: 
One Rohrbeck's No. 10 Vegetative apparatus. 
One Rohrbeck's Steam Sterilizing apparatus, No. 1, D. 

One dry oven. 

One Pasteur water filter. 

One balance. 
Micrometer. 
Four Leitz microscopes, No. 6. 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



One Zeiss microscope, No. 2a stand, with the 2 m m a apochromatic 
objective, a series of compensation oculors and objectives, triple nose 
piece, Abbe Condenser, long arm camera, etc. 

Besides there is a large list of vessels and smaller pieces of appa- 
ratus, reagents, etc., essential in such a laboratory. 

On one side of the laboratory is partitioned off a culture room oc- 
cupied by the apparatus for use in growing certain fungi in connec- 
tion with the investigations. 

There has been made quite an extended original preliminary study 
of a root-gall nematode, Hetei*odera radicicola, which is doing serious 
damage to some crops in various parts of the South. The results of 
this study were published in a bulletin, as a preliminary report on 
Nematode Root-Galls, including the life history and metamorphosis 
of the worm which is the cause of the disease. 







Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



1890 



/ 



OCLC: 36819601 
Entered; 19970429 



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Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
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► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 

► 10 246 10 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Auburn, Alabama 1 

► 11 246 10 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama 1 

► 12 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama f 

Auburn, Ala. : ±b The College, I 

21 v. ; *c 21 cm. I 

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1872-73-1892-93. I 

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Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 



1890-91. 



AUBURN, ALABAMA. 



MONTGOMERY , ALA.: 

THE BKOWN FRINTJNG CO., PHINT1R8 AND BINDERS. 

1891 



— 







BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 




Hit Excellency Thomas G. Jones, President ex-officio 

J. G. Harris, Superintendent of Education ex-officio 



J. G. Gilchrist (term expires 1897)... Montgomery 

M. L. Staxski (te.m expires 1897;. Carrollton 

C. C. Harris (term expires 1897) Decatur 



Jonathan Haralson (term expires 1895) Selma 

B. F. Lioon («erm expires 1895) Tuskegee 

John W. Bisiioi- (terra expires 1895) Tallad«ga 




R. F. Kolb (term expires 1893).... Eufaula 

C. H. Lindsay (term expires 1893) Mobile 

H. Clay Armstrong (term expires 1893) Auburn 



E. T. Glenn, Treasurer. | F. M. Rkese, Secretary. 



\ 



Au< 

flARKSOALE 

FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



Wm. LeROY BROUN, m. a., ll. d., ffr 

President and Professor of Physics and Astronomffi* 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, M. E. f Pir. D., 

Professor of Natural History and Geology. 

•JAMES H..LANE, C. E., A. M., LL. D., 

Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

J. S. NEWMAN, 

Professor of Agriculture and Director of Experiment Station. 

CHARLES C THACH, A. M., 

Professor of English and Latin. 
N. T. LUPTON, A. M., M. D., LL. D., 
Professor of General and Agricidtural Chemistry and State Chemist. 
Lieut. JOHN B. McHONALD, 10th Cavalry U. S. A (West Point), 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 
GEORGE H. BRYANT, M. E. (Mass. Inst. Technology), 
Director of Laboratory and Instructor of Mechanic Arts. 
GEORGE F. ATKINSON, Ph. B., 
Professor of Biology. 
CHARLES H. BARNWELL, A. M., 
< 1 djunot Professor of Modern Language's and History. 
L. W. WILKINSON, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Chemical Laboratory. 

J. J. WILMORE, M. E., 

B. A. BLAKEY, M. Sc, 

Assistant Instructors in Mechanic Arts. 

M. DOWNER PACE, M. Sc, 

ARTHUR St. C. DUNSTAN, C. E„ 

H. CLAY* ARMSTRONG, B. Sc, 

DANIEL GILLIS, B. Sc, 

Assistant* in Mathematics and English* 

J. H. DRAKE, M. D., 

Surgeon. 

0.0. THACH, 

Librarian and Recording Secretary. 

0. D. SMITH, 

Corresponding Secretary. 



207875 



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OFFICERS 



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OF THE 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 



BOARD OF VISITORS. 



«• ♦- 






COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION : 

Hon. J. G. Gilchrist,. . ..Hon. R. F. Ligon,. . ..Hon. J. B. Mitchell 



OFFICERS OF THE STA TION. 

W. L. Broun President 

J. S. Newman Director and Agriculturist 

N. T. Lcptox '. . . . . Vice-Director and Chemist 

I*. H. Mell* #. . Botanist 

€K F. Atkinson Biologist 

ASSISTANTS. 

Isaac Ross, First Asst. Agriculturist in Charge of Live Stock and Dairy 

J as. Clayton Second Assistant Agriculturist 

J. T. Anderson, Ph. D. First Assistant Chemist 

L. W. Wilkinson, M. Sc Second Assistant Chemist 

J. F. Wilkinson, B. Sc Third Assistant Chemist 

R. E. Noble, B. Sc Fourth Assistant Chemist 

A t M. Lloyd, B. Sc Assistant Botanist 

• Prof. Moll has charge of the Meteorological Observations. 



OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 



The leading object of the College, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, is to 
teach the principles and the applications of science. 

In its course of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that relate 
to agriculture and the mechanic arts, so far as the facilities at 
its disposal will permit ; and at the same time the discipline 
obtained by the study of languages and other sciences is not 
neglected. 

All students are required to study the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, and 
opportunity for their study is offered to students in any course. 

The special or technical instruction given is thus based on 
a sound, general education. 

The College, in fact, has become a distinctive school of in- 
dustrial science — or Polytechnic Institute — a title which by 
resolution of the trustees is permitted to be inscribed on the 
catalogue— and work of great value to the youth of the State 
is now being accomplished by fitting them, by a thorough 
science-discipline, in which handicraft in the lower classes is 
made a prominent feature, for the successful and honorable 
performance of the responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline of the 
students in endeavoring to train them to habits of accurate 
scientific thought, and thus to qualify them for the duties of 
life, their moral and Christion training will always constitute 
the prominent care and thought of the Faculty. 








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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR INSTRUC- 
TION. 



The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory 
instruction in applied science in the following departments : 

I. — IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

m 

The farm contains 226 acres and is supplied with illustrated 
specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in connec- 
tion with the College, where experiments and scientific inves- 
tigations relating to agriculture are daily made, affords unusual 
opportunities to students to become familiar with agriculture, 
its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in the 
field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where lectures are 
delivered in presence of the objects discussed, and during the 
year exercises in practical agriculture are given the students 
who enter upon this course of study. 

II. — IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of Mechanic Arts is used as an auxiliary in 
industrial education, as a school of manual training in the arts 
that constitute the foundation of various industrial pursuits. 
The work performed by the students is instructive in charac- 
ter, as in any other laboratory, and the classes are taught in 
sections by a series of graded lessons under the supervision of 
the professor. In the lower classes of the College each stu- 
dent enters this school, and is assigned three exercises a week, 
each exercise being two hours long. 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade,.but to 
educate, to discipline and train the eye and the hand, as well 
as the mind, and thus by associating manual and mental train- 
ing, to thoroughly educate the student for the duties of life 
whatever his vocation may be. There is no attempt to teach 















Agricultural and Mechanical College. 7 

students special skill in constructing articles of commercial 
value, but all the exercises are systematically arranged and . 
designed for purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall 90 x 
50 feet, and is provided with a twenty -five horse power Corliss 
engine, with indicator, a planer, circular saw, band saw, two 
scroll saws, a buzz planer, twenty stands with lathes, with full 
sets of lathe and carpentry tools required for instruction. 

A brick building with two rooms, each 30x35 feet has been 
constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with sixteen forges and tools required 
for a forge department, the other with a cupola furnace, hav- 
ing a capacity of 1,000 pounds, a core oven, moulding benches 
and special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a Sturte- 
vant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from the engine. 

The machine department is equipped with eight engine 
lathes, one speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one post drill, 
one shaper, one five- foot planer, one universal milling machine, 
a corundum tool-grinder and small emery grinder. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with benches 
and vices for twelve students. 

The Weston dynamo, used at present for lighting the halls, 
is located in a room adjoining the Mechanic Art laboratory, 
and is run by a ten-horse power engine, constructed by the 
students in the Mechanic Arts. 

It is designed to supply the different laboratories with elec- 
tricity by this dynamo. 

HI. — IN PEAOTIOAL OHBMISTBY.' 

• * 

The new chemical laboratory is supplied with new and 
modern apparatus, and in its entire equipment affords excellent 
facilities for instruction in practical chemistry. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this laboratory by 
scientific experts, in connection with the work of the agricul- 
tural experiment station, are of especial value to advanced 
students, and afford them unusual opportunities to learn the 



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methods of scientific research. The building contains a large 
general laboratory that will accommodate sixty students, and 
lecture room with capacity for one hundred seats, and nine 
other rooms, all appropriated to instruction and research in 
chemistry. 

It is equipped with the improved modern appliances neces- 
sary for instruction and investigation. 

iv. — in physics. 

In the new College building provision will be made for labor- 
atory work in the department of physics. Special rooms in the 
basement are appropriated for this purpose, and it is designed 
to equip them with all necessary appliances. An improved 
testing machine, of 35,000 pounds capacity, has recently been 
purchased of Itiehle Bros, for this laboratory. 

V. — IN MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the basement, 
and is provided with tables and appliances to accommodate 
thirty students, with an excellent collection of minerals. 

VI. — IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station, investi- 
gations in botany are given special attention, and opportunities 
are offered advanced students for practical work in a labora- 
tory especially fitted with microscopes, tables, a dark room for 
photographic work, and appliances needed for instrrction and 
research. This department is provided with Auzoux's clastic 
models of seeds and flowers for teaching botany. 



vn. — in BIOLOGY. 






The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture room 
of the professor, and is furnished with tables, microscopes and 
appliances for investigation. Each student of the class works 
under the supervision of the professor. 

Vin.— IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including transits, 
levels plane table, etc., is provided for the use of the students, 
and the customary exercises in the field are »iven 




■m 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 9 

IX. — IN DRAWING. 

All the students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as well as 
to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observation and exe- 
cution. A large, well-lighted drawing room, that will accom- 
modate fifty students, is provided with tables, lock boxes, etc. 

MILITARY TACTIC8. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity with 
the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of regular 
military drill, and in addition the military system is used as 
a means of enforcing discipline and securing good order, 
promptness and regularity in the performance of academic 
duties. 

This department is under the charge of Lieut. J. B. Mc 
Donald, 10th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

It has recently been supplied with new cadet muskets and 
accoutrements for the corps, and, for artillery practice, with 
two three-inch rifle guns, carriages and limbers. 






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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
COLLEGE BUILDING. 



The frontispiece is a representation of the recently con- 
structed main college building. It is 160 by 71 feet, and 
contains, exclusive of the basement floor, thirty-five rooms. 
This building is not used for dormitories for students but 
is appropriated for purposes of instruction and investigation. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors 
laboratories, library, museum, armory, etc. The illustrations 
of the four floors on the following pages indicate the uses to 
which the rooms have been assigned. 







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CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The chemical laboratory is a handsome two-story structure, 40 by 60 
feet, with a rear projection 35 by 60 feet of one story and basement. 
The exterior is of pressed brick, with cut stone trimmings, and terra- 
cotta ornamentation. 




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and the other a private workTng.rS>m 0ne f ° r combustion f »"> ac <* 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



17 




Second Floor. 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and contains 
improved working-tables, with water, gas and every necessary appli- 
ance for chemical work. Niches in the wall opposite each working- 
table, with hoods, where necessary, connect with flues, and furnish the 
best possible means of escape fey deleterious vapors, while ventilators 
in the ceiling furnish additional means for getting rid of noxious gases, 

2 



•i^\-S^ t 



f I 



18 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



The pitch is sixteen feet in the clear, with paneled ceiling of oiled 
southern pine. The rooms are wainscotted throughout and finished in 
natural wood. 

The second story contains a lecture-room and room for gas analysis. 
Around this lecture room are cases for containing crude and manufac- 
tured products, illustrating the subjects of agricultural and industrial 
chemistry, which are prominent subjects taught in this institution. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, ninety by fifty feet. The second story 
is the audience hall, used for Commencement and other public occa- 
sions. 

The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of Mechanic Arts. 



GRADUATES IN 1890. 



• 



CLASS OF 1890. 



i 



With Degree op Bachelor of Science. (B. So.) 

Benjamin Cheney Abernethy Florida. 

James William Bivins Lee. 

Wilmer Callaway • • • • Lee. 

Walter Girard Cook Lowndes. 

George Woodhull Emory Lee. 

Stonewall Jackson Emory Lee. 

Francis Maury Fontaine Georgia. 

Daniel Gillis. • • • • • • • -Georgia. 

William Groce Harrison , . . Talladega. 

Robert Edward Daniel Irvin Lee. 

John Hammond Little '. Lee. 

Wilmot Bivins Matthews Lee. 

Frank Davis Milstead - Elmore. 

John Milton Plorida - 

Robert Earnest Noble Calhoun. 

Reuben Hayne Poole. = • • ■ -Georgia. 

Percy Willett Terry Jefferson. 

George Houston Waring Georgia. 

James Fielden Wilkinson Dale. 

With Degree op Civil Engineer. (C. E.) 

M. Downer Pace, B. Sc Macon. 

James Quarles, A. B • • - Cla y- 

With Degree op Mining Engineer. (M. E.) 

Boiling Hall Crenshaw, B. Sc. . . Butler. 

Arthur St. Charles Dustan, & Sc Virginia. 



■ 



V 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS, 



AWARDED CERTIFICATES IN 1890. 



The students of each class who secure a grade above 90 in three or 
more subjects are distinguished for excellence in schol- 
arship, and are awarded 

jioNoi\ Certificates. 
The following students received honor certificates in 1890 : 

Senior Class. 

Benjamin Cheney Abernethi Florida. 

James William Bivins \f% Lee/ 

George Woodhull Emory J . . Lee. 

Dauiel Gillis . . . Georgia. 

Frank Davis Milstead Elmore. 

Percy Willett Terry . Jefferson. 

James Fielden Wilkinson Dale. 

Junior Class. 

Lawrence Ernest Baker Jefferson. 

Harmon Benton Barbour. 

Frank Jarvis Bivins Lee. 

Seaborn Jesse Bnckalew Chambers. 

Walter Edward Fitzgerald Georgia, 

Charles Bowls Glenn Lee, 

Clifford Leroy Hare Lee. 

Beverly Franklin Harwood \ . Perrv. 

Charles Cicero Johnson Coosa. 

John Calvin Kimball Georgia, 

Isaac Isaiah Moses Georgia, 

William Henry Oates Mobile. 

Petit Reynolds. . , f , Macon. 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 21 

Sophomore Class. 

Elbert Cathey A very t Shelby. 

Leigh Stafford Boyd Lee. 

Charles Allen Brown Sumter. 

Joseph Little Burr Georgia. 

Henry Ticknor DeBardeleben Jefferson. 

Henry Farris Dobbin Florida. 

Eugene Hamiter Graves Barbour. 

Raleigh Williams Greene Lee. 

Ealeigh Frederick Hare >. Lee. 

Louis Philip Heyman Georgia. 

Arthur Lynn Jones ... Autauga. 

Glen McCulloh Lee. 

Benjamin Walter McCntchen Lee; 

Frank McLemore Moseley Montgomery. 

Walter Evan Richards Chambers. 

Robert Jefferson Trammell Lee. 

David Edwin Wilson .Jefferson. 

FRE8HMAN CLA88. 

Robert Lee Gordon Bivins Lee. 

Walter Scott Crump St. Clair. 

George Alpheus Dennis. Chilton. 

Hamilton Rowan Johnstone Mobile. 

Charles David Kline Texas. 

James Monroe Little Lee. 

Charles Henry Smith Georgia. 

Rosser Colbert Spratling Chambers. 

William Van Antwerp Mobile. 




— - 







CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 

FOR THE SESSION 1890-91. 

GKADUATE STUDENTS. 

[Residence is Alabama when State is not named.] 

* TtfAMTT RESIDENCE. 

Daniel Gillis^ Georgia. 

Pleasant Lee Hutchinson 06 • .Georgia. 

John Hammond Little ^r^- Lee ' 

Andrew Manly Lloydr/T. Lee. 

Eobert Earnest Noble Calhoun. 

James Miles Quarles Clay. 

James Fielden Wilkinson 4^ Dale - 

Senior Class. 

Lawrence Earnest Baker Jefferson. 

Harmon Benton • -Barbour. 

Frank Jarvis Bivins; » Lee. 

Seaborn Jesse Buckalew Chambers. 

James Albert Cox .1 Lee. 

James Nathaniel Dean Montgomery. 

Walter Edward FitzgeraJd Georgia. 

William Thomas Glass Georgia. 

Charles Bowls Glenn .[ ; Lee. 

Clifford Leroy Hare •',•/ Lee. 

Beverly Franklin Harwood Perry. 

Charles Cicero Johnson \ Coosa. 

John Calvin Kimball Georgia. 

Frank Allemong Lupton 1 Lee. 

William Audley Marshall Georgia. 

Alexander Dowling McLennan Barbour. 

William Henry Oates Mobile. 



^ — ,^^—^^^^^^^^^—^^^^^^^^^^^^mm 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 23 

Petit Reynolds Macon. 

William Edward Reynolds Macon. 

Robert Clanton Smith Chambers. 

Clanton Ware Williams. t: Montgomery. 

Junior Class. 

William Sayre Allen Montgomery. 

Archie Scruggs Averett Georgia. 

Earl Averitt. .-rr. Jefferson. 

Elbert Cathey Avervt. . .Shelby. 

Leigh Stafford Boyd\ . . .Lqe. 

Charles Allen Brown Siimter. 

Jabob Thompson Bullen . . .Montgomery. 

Walter Bartow Clay Montgomery. 

Amos Hill Cox.^sr Lee. 

John Gereardt Crommelin . . . . Montgomery. 

Jesse- Lock Culver . . Bullock. 

Henry Lee Davidson Montgomery. 

George William Dantzler Autauga. 

Henry Ticknor DeBardeleben Jefferson. 

Henry Farris Dobbin . . .Florida. 

William Francis Feagin ....'. Barbour. 

James Edward Gachet . Lee. 

Eugene Hamiter Graves Barbour. 

Raleigh Williams Greene Lee. 

Raleigh Frederick Hare . . • Lee. 

Louis Philip Heyman ■ . . .Georgia. 

Andrew Silous Horn .tt. Clay. 

Thomas Pearson Hutchinson rr- Georgia. 

Arthur Lyne Jones • Autauga. 

Clifton Arthur Jones Lee. 

Edward Oscar Knox . . .77. Pike. 

Harold Magruder. . .rrr Georgia. 

Robert Dibrell Mc Alister . . tt- - Georgia. 

Glenn McCulloh. . .-rrr Lee. 

Duncan McDongald . rrr Georgia. 

Alfred Huger Moses. - Colbert, 




24 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Frank McLemore Mosely Montgomery. 

Louis Sinclair Munford Hale. 

Leonidas Warren Payne.V Lee. 

Frank Peabody . rr r. Georgia. 

Charles Teed Pollard . .• Montgomery. 

Walter Evan Richards Chambers. 

James L. Richey Calhoun. 

Wychc Jackson Robinson Chambers. 

Robert Lee Shippf.. -rrv .Georgia. 

Edward Broadns Smith >>«, Opelika. 

Signor Sydney Strong . . . . . Georgia. 

George Adams Thomas Montgomery. 

Sheldon Lynn Toomer Lee. 

Robert Jefferson Trammel Lee. 

Sydenham Benjamin Trapp Calhoun. 

David Marshall Walke^ Marengo. 

David Lewis Whetstone. Elmore. 

David Edwin Wilson Jefferson. 

Thomas Felton Wimberly^ Lee. 

Sophomore Class. 

Theodore Benjamin Bethea.-r. Montgomery. 

Wallace Reverdy Bishop./. Talladega. 

Robert Lee Gordon Bivins. jf/. Lee. 

Francis Marshall Boykin.t Montgomery. 

Massey Robert Burton Lee. 

Clifford Fontaine Clopton .4 Montgomery. 

Joseph Johnstone Crawford, rr. Georgia. 

Charles Henry Crowder. fT. . Montgomery. 

Walter Scott Crump. .-\. St. Clair. 

Union Anderson Cullbreath Lee. 

Clarence William Daugette Lee. 

Mims Davis.'k Autauga. 

Joel Dumas. .+. Wilcox. 

John Harris Dunstan Virginia. 

Daniel Benjamin Edwards, jr Dallas. 

Thomas Preston Flanagan's^ Lee. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 25 

Thomas Gardner Foster .-f Montgomery. 

John Halifax Flynn Hh Etowah. 

George Wilson Harrison, .r-r Green. 

William Frazier Herbert Montgomery. 

Joseph Andrew Herron . rp" # • • Montgomery. 

John Henry Holt, -f Georgia. 

Mims Lamar Howard .-£ Autauga. 

William Forney Hughes X Elowah. 

Hamilton Rowan Johnstone .+. Mobile. 

Amos Wesley Jones, .tt Madison. 

Byron Watts Jones. JL Lee. 

Thomas Litchfield Kennedy, jr Lee. 

Jere Clements King Butler. 

Charles David Kline tfajr.,..*.. Mexico. 

James Monroe Little .^f.% Lee. 

James Berry Loveless Marshall. 

Homer Bedford Lusk. Marshall. 

Nicholas Barnett Marks Kentucky. 

Frank Inman McEee Georgia. 

Edward Baker Mell.^ Georgia. 

Hampton Knox Miller Talladega. 

Herbert Abner Milner . rfc . . ■ Jefferson. 

Hugh Nelson , . • • Dallas. 

Minor Evans Nicholson . rt . . . ..... Georgia. 

John Austin Norton ^ ;....... Montgomery. 

Oscie Kyle Parker .Elmore- 
Henry Lee Porter, rfc^, St. Clair. 

Joseph Samuel Pou.sf^f Lee. 

Siduey Powell Reaves . dE\ Georgia. 

Walter Merritt Riggs So. Carolina. 

John Shelton Robinson .Jefferson. 

Logan Abner Siebold.^ Marshall. 

Guy Allen Shafer. ^ *. Perry. 

Charles Henry Smitb.4 .Georgia. 

Eugene Aglette Smith $. Bullock. 

John Howard Smith. .^ Georgia. 

Linton Sparks Smithy Georgia. 





MMi 



i\ 



^^^ 



. 



N 



26 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Rosser Colbert Spratling.T*. Chambers. 

William Simeon Street. .-£; Tallapoosa. 

William Augustus Thomas — Chambers. 

Wyeth Todd . ^ . . Marshall. 

William Van Antwerp. ^4 Mobile. 

Joel Franklin Webb Coosa. 

Charles Hutchinson Westoa+ Colbert. 

John Mitchel Woolley . rfcr Georgia. 

Fjreshman Class. 

Felix Reuben Allison J?T Lee. 

JpGlaorgeomith Anderson .^ . / Lee. 

John Frank Anderson ,tt. . Georgia. 

\ J[Ihamp""l5ekbury Andrews. . . . lr\ . ..* Tennessee. 

J fiarvey Armstrong .0. . . * Missouri. 

Isaac Alfred Baker . *w Jefferson. 

Joseph Johnson Beggs. *— : Jefferson. 

Richard Isaac Belts . . tt\ . % Monroe. 

Henry Harrington Bookhart . . .q\ , Georgia. 

WtffiaigrPel ^m ar fll ay toff . . . . £ Lee. 

George Lee Cleere Franklin. 

ilufiiilt'IfwHlW'OljLii^ ??. Lee. 

Joseph Anderson Coleman. —r Georgia. 

Rosberry Covington Conner ...//. Macon. 

William Lonie Crew .y. Coosa. 

f Henry Crommelin Montgomery. 

1 Walter Caldwell Darwin ^ Madison. 

Palmer Payne Daugette /. ( . Lee. 

J Charles Fairchild DeBardeleben . iL ...... .^Jefferson. 

. Rufus Thomas Dorsey, jr ) . )>f. y^ff. . . .Georgia. 

Ebenezer Westley Doughty ij!k Georgia: 

Flurry Pellicer Dowe. . . .--. Montgomery. 

Joseph Addison Driver. . . . .\ Lkt. . Perry. 

Waverly Goode Duggar . .... /.h Hale. 

( Julius Confree Dunham .... /. Y Montgomery. 

Jamea. Dunlap J.% Madison. 

I Charles Dunlap /.^. Madison. 



# 



mm 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 27 

• John Thomas Eckford *.c) Lee. 

Turner Thomas Edmunds .rr Georgia. 

Wilbur Thomas Edwards, r*.. . Tallapoosa. 

David Silas Flanagan . . .-rr-. ; Lee. 

Cliff Foy • Barbour. 

, j, \ Robert Cherry Foy .^. . ^ }. ...... ^. . &<Barbonr. <W^>-*-i . &Q 

i James Thaxton Gillespie -. .^ JeffersonV 

John Samuel Godwin . . rrsL.fr • Barbour. 

Richard Billups Going. . . . k. J. Jefferson. 

) James Perry Grant J .\\ Barbour. 

Eddie Connerly Gregory . «. Jefferson. 

John Earnest Griffin..—.... .....Lee. 

Crossland Clarence HareJ/. • • • • •> Lee. 

Augustus J. Harris . . •>» H Morgan. 

James Clanton Haygood .. - ..... Montgomery. 

/ Arnold Whitfield Herren %<k. ■■.■■■■ -Elmore. 

William Marion Plight . . .r-. . . ; Calhoun. 

Harry Holgate ~ Georg.a. 

Julius Cicero Hudson £-f£v,-v Lee " 

/ Robert Ford Hunter 2 / Georgia. 

Jeremiah Jackson • • • • ; Lee. 

T i o i t~i l y Ants 



I 



Jacob Samuel Johnson *• % Autauga. 

William Young Johnstone .rr... Barbour. 

Henry Clay Jones #•?• Montgomery. 

John Fletcher Jones. ,.<*...... Autauga. 

I Remer Young Jones. J.Q ^ eor g ia - 

Welborn V. JopesJ^r. . . .. . . & i Lee. 

Madison Leonard • n 5? *T 

t Orrin Joseph McCarley 3. £ Chambers. 

I Thomas McElrath 1- 3 ^ 00 f • 

Patrick Roland Cleburne McFarland . rrr Lauderdale. 

„ , . -..• -rr Barbour. 

Edwin McKay rt y, 

I Paul Pratt McKeown ?.¥ Florida. 

John Robert McNab .rr. ....... ^- harbour. 

/ George Young McRee . . . A. 9. Georgia. 

Ernest Knoles Miller $..% • •&*&• 

Andrew Hammil Milstead. . .•?. / • • • • -Elmore. 




\ 






■■■ - - - 



MMH 






UB 






I 



n 



• 



& 



i 



28 'Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Edward Beall Mitchell 3Y Georgia. 

Laudator) Greene Moore .ft 3$. Lee. 

Peyton Herndon Moore X . M }. Blonnt. 

\ William Washington Moore . M -l Blonnt. 

| Charles Carter Newman^c . . . Jr\ . ^TT Lee. 

Stanley Cummings Nixon . rr. Jefferson. 

Thomas Winfrey Oliver. .Montgomery. 

Thomas Verner Ord way>C . # 3 Tennessee. 

Joseph Preistly Orme. ....... V(H Chambers. 

James Solomon Palmer. ». Blonnt. 

Charles Moss Powell ...«—■. Bullock 

James Harris Pride. .,*,.". ; Madison. 

Oscar Browder Pruett. .t. Barbour. 

George Noble Ro6s ."h-jr-. Lee. 

I Thomas Henry Schuessler U-. i~ Chambers 

Benjamin Harris Sargent . .' .Franklin. ' 

Walter Russell Shafer .^«* p err y 

James Edward Stanley ,M Y Chambers. 

Robert Otis Stone ff£ Mobile 

Jack Thorington #$ Montgomery. 

Henry Curry Turner . Madison 

Frank Atkinson Vernon k.O.... Chambers. 

Eugene Whaley ... Jeffem)n 

A ndrew Hearne Whitman :¥!... 3 .i Lee 

Virginius Wilcox .. TT. . . mc^Lu 

tit-11- -n. . m > •■*-X" Mobile. 

William. Dunbar Wills.... t$ ^ Le 

James Albert WileorJ.r: .....'.' .' .' . [ " .' ' ][ [ ] . Barbour 

Arthur Zachanah Wrightj 4 . .3 . . . Lee . 

Cary Oscar Wright.^/ «, ; Uf Lee 

Sub-Freshman Class. 
Daniel Spigner Anderson.^. Lee 

William Frederick Bellinger '.'..' [[''..[ Jefferson. 

Knox Booth -... Aut 

David French Boyd .. ^ Lee g 

t rank Asbury Boy kin rp... j^ 

James Hardy Bradford .fT '.^.'.'.'.'.'.'..Ue. 



K 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 29 

» 

Willie Orlando Brooks. . r? Lauderdale.- 

Porcius Festus Caddell Bibb. 

James Burch Charles Montgomery. 

Philip George Clay. Hale. 

Charles Edward Coleman Georgia. 

Henry Wyatt Dozier Jefferson. 

Leooard Leopidas God bold . !+ Wilcox. 

William Wesley Goldsmith .; Lowndes. 

William Woolson Goplsby . rr .Elmore. 

James A. GrifficrlT Lee. 

Benjamin Browning Haralsoncv Dallas. 

John Fletcher Heard rp^. ... . ... .Lee. 

John Alexander Jackson . . .' . \ . . \ . . .Lee. 

Charles Albert Johnstone Mobile. 

Cary Park McElhaney^Jr. ... . .Lee. 

Malcolm Demos Moore Hale. 

Eddie Lette Mosely . .r- .Monroe. 

Howard "Bond Mosely . r. Monroe. 

Hunter. Glenn Motley. Macon. 

Malcoltn Oates.. ..rr Mobile. 

George Emmett Pace.rr\ Macon. 

Charles Llewellyn Pinkston.. Montgomery. 

John Williams Hudson Powers. Lefe*- 

Thomas Percy Rockett . ;-r "...-.. Jefferson. 

Edwin Norville Sawkins Mississippi.^ 

Charles Watkins Scruggs, rr Madison. 

Andrew Jackson Smith .-r\ ^ ee - 

Marshall Burt Smith. _ • • Lee - 

James Nelson Stephens Barbour. 

Felix Stanley Thomas. .-* ***- 

Joseph Yerner Vaughan .< Dallas. 

Henry Watts Vinson..... dTJT 

Jesse Myers West .-rr T a ,'ji 

Kobert Patton Weedon {^J' 1 * 

Ross Green Whisenaut.*»r. • • • a 

Frank Lewis Whitman .A ee ' 

John Walker Wilcox . 'rr. mWe ' 




3 



f 



Agricultural and Mechflmtm College. 




80 



Marvin Clark Price Wiljietffs.-T Mobile. 

John Adams Wills. . Lee. 

James Alexander Wilson Franklin. 

Special Students. 

Albert Crosland Bowen.T? Dale. 

Panl Andrew Goldsmith . ^f". Lowndes. 

Arthur Harris Hall Georgia. 

James Thomas Heflin Randolph. 

Joseph Andrew Holifield Lee. 

Dudley David Stephens. .T Barbour. 



y* 



SUMMARY. 

Graduates 7 

Senior Class * I. J A 21 

Junior Class J.S . . . 50 

Sophomore Class. ... '.1 61 

Freshman Class \).r. . . 93 

Sub- Freshman J. / 46 

Special students 6 



_ t 
-*5 




Total 




284 



Vrf ^ 




NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 



English 270 

History. 147 

French 18 

German 18 

Latin . 67 

Mental Science . . . 10 

Political Economy 22 

Mathematics 244 

Chemistry , 95 



Biology 45 

Agriculture 126 

Physics 122 

Botany. 61 

Geology 49 

Engineering 40 

Drawing 224 

Mechanic Arts 150 

Military Tactics 268 



* 



u 



J 



I A. 

y ' 



Military Organization. 

-s 1890/91. r J 

President. v 

W. L. BROUN. 

Commandant. 
J. B. McDONALD, 1st Lt. 10th U. S. Cavalry. 




A A: 



I M 



^ 1. L. E. Baker, 
2. J. N. Dean, 



1. R. C. Smith, Adj't. 

2. W. A. Marshall, Qr. Mr., 
ft 3- C. L. Hare, 
.y 4. F. J. Bivins, 
(8 5. C. B. Glenn, 



■j , — - — ~ — * 

q 4. B. F. Harwood. 

Cadet 1st Lieutenants. 

£ 6 0. C. Johnson. 






ctl. H.Benton. 



<H 1. C. A Brown, 
43 2. L. S. Munford, 



J. H DRAKE, M. D. 

Cadet Captains. 

3. F. A. Lupton, 

Qy7. J. C. Kimball, ^ /y>u ) ' 

*• 8. W. E. FlTZGERAl)^, 2. 

;4 9. J. A. Cox, / , ) 

£10. S.J. Buckalew.) J - 

Cadet 2d Lieutenants. 

32. P. Reynolds, 



>./»*■ 



1. W. F. Feagin, Sgt. Major, 
ft 2. J. T. Bullen, - f: - 

3. D. L. Whetstone, Qr. Mr. Sgt, 

4. E. C.Averyt, Col. Sgt. 
C 5. G. A. Thomas, 

<£ 6. A. L. Jones, 
^ 7. W, B. Clay, 
0, 8. H. L. Davidson, 
& 9. J. G. Crommelin, 



J 

Cadet First Sergeants. / J ^ '. 

C 3. J. E. Gachet, y ^J 
d 4. H.F.Dobbin. } ' y / 

Cadet Sergeants. /Q J 'V ^ 

$10. A. R. AvERETT^t' I 

Q 11. R. W. Greene, 
12. R. F. Hare, 



j ■> 



4 



>' 



*v- 



<3« 



13. R. J- Teammell, 



<*- 



<r 



>v 



^ 14. E. H. Graves, > O 
15. H. T. DeBardeleben, _ 

^16. D. E. Wilson, -"T" 4 . 
17,~ : *S«P*l*n, /* » * 7 

MER, V/ I 



(A 



j 18. S. L. Toom 
19. F. M. Moseley. 



5 
6" 

3 



N 



) 



&]. J. DtFMAS, 

^2. R. C Spratling, 
*3. C H. Smith, 
C 4. W. R. Bishop, 
5. W. 8. Crump, 
ft 6. E. B. Mell, 
/ 7. C. H . Weston, 

a>8jaHHua*r 

^9. L. A. Siebold, 



Cadet Corporals. 

O 10. C. F. Clopton 

11. L. S. Smith, 

12. H. R. Johnstone, 
n 13. T. G. Foster^ 

bl4. J. H. Dunstan, Y7* LaA 




s> 



: j8l5. Wr Van Antwerp 
-16. *J S. Pou, i.-' . 
17. *C. D. Kltne, jlf- 

i 



(218. *R. L. G. Bivins 
CsJ9. E. A. Smith. 
N0TE,-Numbers indict tiie revive rw* of oflcers in each grade, * 
Color Corporal. , i^ 




x 



< \ 



V 



—^ ^^ 



32 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission must be of good moral character. 
To enter the fourth class the applicant must be not less than 
fifteen years of age. and should be qualified to pass a satisfac- 
tory examination on the following subjects : 

1. Geography and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) An examination upon sentences containing 
incorrect English, (b) A composition giving evidence of sat- 
isfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, grammar and 
division into paragraphs. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, including fundamental 
operations; common and decimal fractions ; denominate num- 
bers, the metric system ; percentage, including interest and 
discount; proportion; extraction of square and cube roots, 
(b) Algebra, to quadratic equations. 

Those applicants who desire to continue the study of Latin 
should be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination in Latin 
grammar and the first two books of Caesar, in addition to the 
above subjects. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should be pre- 
pared to stand a satisfactory examination on all the studies of 
the lower classes, as shown in the courses of study. Where 
opportunity has not been offered to pursue special studies re- 
quired at this College, the system of equivalents will be 
adopted, and studies which denote an equivalent amount of 
discipline and training will be accepted as satisfactory. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, the 16th 
of September, the day on which the session opens. Candi- 
dates will also be examined during the session, when applica- 
tion is made for admission. 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance ex- 
aminations for full admission to the Freshman class are admit- 
ted to the sub-college department. 

They will be advanced to full admission to the Freshman 




/ 



/ 
/ 



^m 



^™ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 33 

class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily the required 
examinations. 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report immediately to the 
President. No sludent will be admited to a recitation in any class pre- 
vious to matriculation. 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen reci- 
tations per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exer- 
cises in laboratory work, drawing and military drill. These 
additional exercises occupy not less than twelve hours per week 
and in all give twenty-seven exercises per week required. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Students who are qualified to prosecute the studies of the 
iunior class, and those over twenty-one years of age who are 
not candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, with the 
advice of the Faculty, the subjects of study they may prefer 
and for which they may be qualified ; all other students will 
be assigned to one of the regular prescribed courses of study, 
unless otherwise ordered by the Faculty. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final exaniina- 
tions in any one study become special students. They will be 
classed as regular students pursuing a course for a degree 
whenever they (ftn pass the examinations in those subjects in 
which they were found deficient. 

Students candidates for a degree, who are not in full stand- 
ing in all the prescribed studies of a class, rank in the military 
department with that class in which they have the greater 
number of studies, and their names are so placed m the 

Catalogue. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study inclpde the Physical, Chemical and 
Natural Sciences, with their applications ; Agriculture, Biology, 
Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Engineering, Drawing, 

3 




34 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



English, French, German and Latin Languages, History, 
Political Economy, Mental and Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to offer a 
liberal and practical education as a preparation for the active 

pursuits of life. 

There are three degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and re- 
quiring four years for its completion : 

I. C0UR8E IN CHEMI8TRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

II. Course in Mechanics and Engineering. 

III. General Course. 

There are also two partial courses, each requiring two years 
for its completion : 

IV. Two Years' Course in Agriculture. 
V. Two Years' Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I includes theoretical and practical instruction in 
those branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and is 
especially adapted to those who propose to devote themselves 
to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II includes the principles and applications of the 
sciences that directly relate to civil and mechanical engineer- 
ing, and is adapted to those who expect to enter the profession 
of engineering. 

Courses III has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language to meet 
the wants of those students who have selected no definite voca- 
tion in life, as well as of those who propose ultimately to 
engage in teaching, or in some commercial or manufacturing 
business. 

Courses IV and V have been -arranged for. the benefit of 
those students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, are 
unable to continue at college four years and take one of the 
regular degree courses. 

Students who complete either of these two year courses 
will, on passing a satisfactory examination, receive certificates 
indicating their attainments, 



/ 



M 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 35 

Those who have completed the general course in each de- 
partment of tjie school of Mechanic Arts, and are qualified, 
can enter upon a more extended technical course in Mechani- 
cal Engineering. 

PEEPAKATOKY COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

Students who expect to become practical pharmacists can 
enter upon a special course of Chemistry and Natural History 
and occupy all their time in the laboratories of these depart- 
ments, under the immediate direction of the professors. 
With the excellent facilities offered in the chemical and 
botanical laboratories, scientific preparation of great value to 
the practical pharmacist can be obtained. 

COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. • 

Students who have received the degree of B. Sc. in Engi- 
neering, or who have prosecuted an equivalent course of study, 
can enter upon a special course of Mining Engineering, which 
includes the following subjects of study, and will require a 
residence of one year : 

Industrial Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of Ores, Miner- 
alogy, Economic Geology, Mining Machinery, Drifting, Tun- 
nelling, Timbering, Ore Dressing, and the various operations 
connected with the exploitation of mines. 

This course of study will be under the charge of the Pro- 
fessors of Chemistry, Engineering and Natural History. 

SPECIAL ONE YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

• 

Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study Agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class un- 
der the Professor of Agriculture, and will be excused from reciting in 
any other class, from military duty, and from all other college duties ; 
but will be under the general college regulations, and will be required 
to have their time fully occupied. 

They can attend the lectures in Agriculture in all the classes, and 
engage in the practical work at the experimental station, in the field, 
stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard and vineyard, etc., and may thus, 
in one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of Scientific Agri- 
culture, 




_ 



^ I^^M^MMj 



4 



36 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 



Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature in 
the courses of education provided for the students of this Col- 
lege, and as far as possible all students are required to enter 
upon laboratory work in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given in the 
following departments : 

I. — Chemistry. 
II. — Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, etc. 
III. — Agriculture. 
IV. — Botany. 
V. — Mineralogy. 
VI. — Biology. 
VII. — Technical Drawing. 
VIII. — Mechanic Arts. 
*IX. — Physics. 

* It is expected to equip tbis laboratory next session. 




T\ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



3T 



I.-COURSE m CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 



First Term. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 
Second Term. 



Third Term. 



5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 6. Mathematics. 

3 Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physiology2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Labor'y.6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6 Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



3. Military Drill. 



3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 



■ 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 



Third Term. 

2. English. 

3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 



3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab y 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 

4. Botany. (Lab'y.) 

1. Military Tactics. 

9. Chemical Laboratory. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 

(a> Begins March 1st. 



3. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 3. 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. 
2. Agriculture. 2 - 

4. Botany. (Lab'y J 4. 

1. Military Tactics. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 

3. Military Drill. 3. 



Third Term. 

English. 

Physics. 

Industrial Chemistry. 

Agriculture. 

Botany. (Lab'y.) 

Military Tactics. 

Chemical Laboratory. 

Practical Agriculture. 

Military Drill. 



38 



Agricultural and Mechanical CoUege. 



First Term, 

2. English Literature. 2. 
2. Mental Science. 2. 

2. Physics. 2. 

2. Geology. 2. 

2. Biology. 2. 

2. Agricultural Chemistry2. 

1. Military Science. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

Political Economy. 2. 

Moral Science. 2. 

Astronomy. 2. 

Geology. 2. 

Biology. 2. 
Agricultural Chemistry2. 

Military Science. 1. 

Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

Practical Agriculture. 2. 



Third Term. 

Political Economy. 

Moral Science. 

Astronomy. 

Geology. 

Biology. 

Agricultur'l Chemistry 

Military Science. 

Chemical Laboratory. 

Practical Agriculture. 



Il-COURSE in MECHANICS and engineering. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Seeond Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. El. Physiology. 
3. Drawing. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



3. Military Drill. 
SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3; Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture (b). 
3. Drawing. 



Third Term. 

2. English. 

3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture (b). 
3. Drawing. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab' v. 



3. Military Drill. 



3. Military Drill. 



3. Military Drill. 



(a) Or History continued. 

(b) For Agriculture may be 
Laboratory. 



Botany hegins March ist. 

substituted French or German or work in the Chemical 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
JUNIOR CLASS. 



39 



First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


3. English, French or 


3. English, French or 


3. English, French or 


German. 


German. 


German. 


3. Physics. 


3. Physics. 


3. Physics. 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Engineering. 


5. Engineering. 


5. Engineering. 


5. Drawing. 


5. Drawing. 


5. Drawing. 


1. Military Tactics. 


1. Military Tactics. 


1. Military Tactics. 


4. Lab'y, Mineralogy (a) 


.4. Lab'y, Mineralogy (a 


).6. Field Wrk, Engin'g (a) 


4. Field Work, Engin'g. 


4. Field Work, Engin'g 


. 3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill. 




4 


SENIOR CLASS. 




First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


2. English Literature (b] 


1.2. Political Economy (b).2. Political Economy (b). 


2. Physics. 


2. Astronomy. 


2. Astronomy. 


2. Geology. 


2. Geology. 


2. Geology. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 


5. Engineering. 


5. Engineering. 


5. Engineering. 


5. Drawing. 


5. Drawing. 


5. Drawing. 


1. Military Science. 


1. Military Science. 


1. Military Science. 



Field Work, Engineer'g Field Work, Engineer'g Field Work, Engin'g. 

III.— GENERAL COURSE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

4. Latin. 

6. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 2. Agriculture. 
3 Military Drill. 6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 



(a) Or Mechanic Arts. . _, 

(b) For Eng. Lit. and Pol. Econ. may be substituted French or German, 



207875 



/ 



40 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



First Term. 

5. Latin. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Genaral Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. Latin. 

3. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work 

3. Military Drill. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 

5. Latin. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. Latin. 

3. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 



Third Term. 

4. Latin. 

3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. Latin. 

3. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 



(b).6. Laboratory Work (b). 6. Laboratory Work (b) 
3. Military Drill . 3 Military Drill. 



First Term. 



2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Moral Science . 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science 
English Thesis. 



2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
3. 
3. 
2. 
1. 



(a) Or History continued. Botany begins March 1st. 

(b) The student may elect the Laboratory of any department for 



Third Term. 

Political Economy. 

Moral Science. 

Astronomy. 

Geology. 

French. 

German. 

Latin. 

Military Science. 

English Thesis. 

which he may be qualified. 



/ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
IV.— TWO YEARS' COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 



41 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 



Third Term. 



5. English. 5 English. 

2. History. 2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 6. Mathematics. 

3. Elem'tary Physiology. 2. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



SECOND YEAR. 
Second Term. 



Third Term. 



3. English. • 3. English. 3. Enghsh. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. Physics. 3. Physics. 3. Physics. 

3 Drawing 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

12.' Mechanic Art Lab'y 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y 12. Mechanic Art Lab y. 

3. Military Drill. ». Military Drill. 3 Military Drill. 

V.— TWO YEARS' COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 



FIRST YEAR. 
Second Term. 



Third Term. 



5. English. 5. English. 5. English. 

2 History 2. History. 2. History. 

5.' Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 6. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elem'tary Physiology.2. Agriculture. 

r\ • 3 Drawing 3. Drawing. 

1 S Art Lab'y. I Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3 Military Drill. 3l Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Second Term. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

5. Agriculture. 



Third Term. 



3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 



3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

5. Agriculture. 



5. Agriculture. 
li Practical Agriculture. 12. Practical Agriculture. 12 Practical Agriculture. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



€J 




warn 



mm^mi 



mmmmmmmmmm 



■ M ■» ■ 




SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES. 






HOURS. 


MONDAY. 


TUESDAY. 


WEDNESDAY. 


THURSDAY. 


FRIDAY. 


SATURDAY. 


1. 

8-9 


4. Algebra. 

3. Latin. 
2. French 
1*2. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic. Arts. 


4. Geometry. 
3. Latin. 
2. German. 
1 & 2. Drawing, 
2. Botany. 


4. Algebra. 

3. Latin. 
2. French. 

1 a 2. Drawing. 
2. Practical Agr. 

4. Mech. Arts. 


4. Geometry. 
3. Latin. 
2. German. 
Ia2. Drawing. 
2. Botany. 


4. Algebra. 

3. Latin. 
2. French. 

1 a 2 Drawing. 
2. Practical Agri. 

4. Mechanic Arts, 
t. Biology. 


Ex e re's in Elocution 


11. 

9-10 


4. English. 

3. Chemistry. 
2. Engineering. 

1. Calculus. 
1. French. 

4. Mech. Arts. 


4. History. 
3. Agriculture. 
2. Engineering. 
2. Botany. 
1. Physics. 


4. English. 

3. Chemistry; 
2. Engineering. 

1. Calculus. 

1. French. 

4. Mech. Arts. 

2. Practical Agri. 


4. History. 
3. Agriculture. 
2. Engineering. 
2. Botany. 
1. Physics. 


4. English. 

3. Chemistry. 
2. Engineering. 
1. Biology. 

1. Calculus. 

1. French. 

2. Latin. 

4. Mech. Arts. 
2. Practical Agr. 


Military Drill. 




MONDAY. 

« 


TUESDAY. 


WEDNESDAY. 


THURSDAY. 


FRIDAY. 


SATURDAY. 


III. 

10-11 


3. English. 
2. Physics. 
1. German. 
1. Engineering. 
1. Biobgy. 


3. History (1. 2). 
3. Botany (2. 3). 
2. Agriculture. 
2. Latin. 
1. Engineering. 
|4. English. 


3. English. 
2. Physics, 
t. German. 

1. Engineering. 
1. Biologrv. 


3. History (1. 2). 

3. Botany (2. 3). 
2. Agriculture. 
2. Latin. 

1. Engineering. 

4. English. 


3. English. 
2. Physics. 
1. German. 
1. Engineering. 


2. German. 

4. Mech. Arts. 1 Sec. 

3. Mech. Arts, 2 Sec. 
1. 2. Machine Work. 
Laboratory Work. 
Field Work. Eng'ng. 



1. 



1 



©* 

^ 
a 












IV. 

11-12 



V. 

12-1 



P. M 



4. Physics (1). 
4. Physiology (2). 
4. Agriculture (3). 
4* Latin. 
3. Drawing. 
2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 
1. English (1). 
I. Polit.Econ.(2.3) 



4. Mech. Arts 1 Sec 

4. Latin. 
3. Drawing. 
2. Mathematics. 
1. Chemistry. 

1. Latin. 



4. Physics (1). 
4. Physiology (2). 
4. Latin. 
3. Agriculture. 
2. Mathematics. 
2, Chemistry. 
1. English (1). 
1. Political Econ- 
omy (2. 3). 



4. Drawing. 
3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 



MONDAY. 



4. Mech. Arts 1 Sec 
3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 
1. Geology. 



4. 
3. 

L 



TUESDAY. 



VI VII 

2-4 



4. Mech. Arts 2 Sec 
3. Mech. Artsi Sec 
3. Field Work Agr. 
1*2. Laboratory. 
1 * 2. Field Work 
Eng'ng. 



3. Mech. Arts 

2d a 3d Sec. 
2. Mineralogy 

Laboratory. 
2. Mech. Arts. 
Military Drill (*) 



Drawing. 
Mathematics. 
Mental Science. 



4. 



4. 
3. 
2. 

L. 



Mechanic Arts 
1 Sec. 

Latin. 

Agriculture, 
Mathematics. 
Chemistry. 



1. Latin. 



4. Physics (1). 

4. Physiology (2Y. 

4. Agriculture (3). 

4. Latin. 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 

2. Chemistry. 

I . Military Science 



4. MecUanic Arts 
- ^ flSec. 
3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 
I. Geology. 



WEDNESDAY. 



4. Mech. Arts 2 Sec 
3. Mech. Artsi Sec 
3. Field Work Agr 
I A 2 Laboratory 

Chem. 
Exer's in Elocut'n 
1 a 2 Field Work 
Enjr'n*. 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

1. Mental Science. 



THURSDAY. 



3. Mech. Arts 

2d a 3d Sec. 

2. Mineralogy 

Laboratory . 

1. 2 Mech. Arts. 

Military Drill, (*) 



FRIDAY. 



4. Mech. Arts 

2 Sec. 

3. Mech. Arts 

lSec 

3. Field Work Agr. 

Ia2. Labor'y CLem 

L a 2. Field Work 
Eng'ng. 

Exer'sin Elocuti'n 



4. Mech. Arts, 1 Sec. 
3. Mech. Arts 2 Sec. 
1 a 2. Machine Work. 
Field Work, Eng'ng. 
Laboratory Work. 



Mechanic Arts. 
Laboratory Work. 



WW 



SATURDAY. 









r 

E 






Chapel services daily at 7:50 A. M. 

Numbers prefixed denote classes,<-l denotes Senior, 2 Junior, <fec. Numbers affixed— (1), (2), (3), denote terms 

♦From 4 :30 to 5 :30 P.. M. 



CO 




mm 





Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



45 



The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to field prac- 
tice. 

Mensuration includes an extended course in measurements 
of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and curvilinear 
figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, lays 
the foundation for the pure and applied Mathematics of the 
Mechanical Engineering course. Analytical Geometry, De- 
scriptive Geometry and Calculus are pursued in the Engineer- 
ing course. Especial attention is given to their practical ap- 
plications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is sup- 
plemented by lectures. Solutions of original practical prob- 
lems are required of the student, to make him familiar with 
the application of principles and formulae. 

Text books. 

Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Wentworth's Trigo- 
nometry and Surveying, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, Waldo's 
Descriptive Geometry, Taylor's Calculus. 

NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. 



PROF. MELL. 

Geology.— This subject is studied in the senior class, and 
extends through the entire session. Special attention is given 
to the geology of Alabama, and many illustrations are drawn 
from the coal and iron fields and other natural deposits of 
minerals in the State. The origin of ore deposits, mineral 
springs and geological relations of soils are carefully studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical Geol- 
ogy for the post-graduate students. This subject is pursued 
by applicants for degrees of Master of Science and Mining 

Engineering. 
The junior class in Engineering spends two terms in Mifl* 

eralogy smd blow-pipe work. 



46 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



Botany.— The students of the Sophomore class begin the 
study of Botany the first of March and continue it through the 
session. Analytical work is made an important feature. This 
class is provided with plants from the fields, and taught how 
to determine their specific names. The work is sufficiently 
exhaustive to enable the student, after completing the course, 
to name any of the ordinary weeds and grasses that he will 
encounter in this section. 

In the Junior class, in the course of Chemistry and Agri- 
culture, an amount of time is devoted to systematic and struc- 
tural Botany, and to advanced laboratory work with the micro- 
scope in the preparation of specimens showing plant structure ; 
this work is sufficient to familiarize the students with the 
methods of plant building and cellular organization. Excellent 
microscopes of the most improved patterns, and all the neces- 
sary chemicals and apparatus for preparing and mounting veg- 
etable tissues, are used by the students. A dark room is 
attached to this laboratory for photo-micrography. 



TEXT-BOOK8. 



Le Conte's Geology, Gray's Botany, Dana's Mineralogy, Goodale's 
Physiological Botany, Nelson's Herbarium and Plant Descriptions. 



(«. 



ALABAMA WEATHER SERVICE. 



The United States Signal Service has established in Ala- 
bama a State system for collecting meteorological data relating 
to climatic changes. The service is now in successful operation 
with the central office located at this Institute. Bulletins are 
issued at the close of each month, compiled from reports sent 
from numerous stations throughout the State. An opportu- 
nity is thus offered the students in Meteorology of becoming 
familiar with the system operated by the Department at Wash- 
ington, 



■^MHNMII 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 47 

CIVIL ENGINEEKING AND DRAWING. 

PROF. LANE. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies of this department begin in the Junior 
class, and require a good knowledge of Algebra, Geometry, 
Trigonometry and Analytical Mechanics. They are as follows: 

Junior class.— Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic 
curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting 
slope stakes, location and construction of common roads and 

railroads. 

Senior class.— Classification, appearances, defects, seasoning, 
durability and preservation of timber; classification and de- 
scription of natural building stones ; bricks and concretes ; cast 
and wrought iron, steel and other metals; limes, cements, mor- 
tars and their manufacture; paints and other preservatives; 
classification of strains and a general mathematical discussion 
of the same ; joints and fastenings ; solid and open built beams ; 
classification, construction and mechanics of masonry ; founda- 
tions on land and in water ; bridges and roofs of different 
kinds ; their construction and strains determined mathemati- 
cally and graphically; common roads, their coverings, location 
and construction; location and construction of railroads; navi- 
gable, irrigation, and drainage canals; river and sea-coast im- 
provements. Theory and practice are combined in both 

Cla8808. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

' Junior Class.-Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers, Gillespie's 
Roads and Railroads, Parson's Track. 
Senior Class.-Wheeler's Civil Engineering, Von Ott s Graphic 

Statics. 

DRAWING. 

All of the students of the Freshman and Sophomore classes 
are required to take Drawing; but only the students in Me- 
chanics and Engineering in the Junior and Senior classes. 

The Freshman class is taught linear and free-hand drawing. 
Th$ Sophomore class is instructed in the principles of ortho- 







48 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

graphic and isometric projections, shade and shadows, perspec- 
tive and tinting. In the Junior class the instruction embraces 
a more extended course in orthographic and isometric drawing, 
perspective, shades and shadows and tinting; also sketches of 
tools and machines, plans, elevations and cross- sections of 
buildings and blue prints. The Senior class makes topograph- 
ical drawings, and drawings of machines, roofs, bridges, etc., 
to different scales and blue prints. Plans, profiles and sections 
of railroad surveys complete the instruction in this depart- 
ment. ' 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Freshman Chiss— Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thome's 
Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model Drawing. 

Sophomore Class.— Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical Per- 
spective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior Class.— Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's Draw- 
ing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to Ihe College, 
Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Senior Class.— French, English and American Plates belonging to the 
College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet, 

AGRICULTURE. 

PROF, NEWMAN. 

The course of instruction in this department embraces: 
I., soils; II., plants; III., domestic animals. In the Freshman 
class twenty lectures, covering the third term of the session, 
treat of soils, their classification, physical defects and reme- 
dies, causes of diminished fertility, and the means used to prd- 
tect them from waste and restore fertility, the theory and prac- 
tice of surface and sub-drainage, etc. The subject is treated 
with special reference to the different classes of soil in Ala* 
bama, omitting as far as possible questions involving a knowl. 
edge of Chemistry and Botany. 

In the Sophomore class, in addition to the discussion of the 
physical properties and mechanical treatment of soils, the 
methods of studying their chemical defects and their remedies 
are dUeussed. The sources of the important element? gf plant 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



49 



food, and their use upon different soils and plants, the restora- 
tion of hnmus, saving home manures, composts, commercial 
fertilizers, the office of different chemical elements in plant 
development— the relations of plant growth to soil and atmos- 
phere, the theory and practice of restoration of crops, ter- 
racing and. grading to prevent washing, plows and plowing— 
indeed everything connected with tilling the soil passes under 
review as foundation work. 

Southern agriculture is then treated in the concrete— the 
history, nature and cultivation of each of our field crops dis- 
cussed as regards their adaptation to and treatment upon the 
soils of Alabama. This occupies the first and second terms. 
The third term is devoted to domestic and commercial horti- 
culture, poultry, sheep, cattle-breeding and management of the 
dairy, etc. In the junior class stock- breeding and management 
is completed in the first term, and a thorough course in 
pomology, including the propagation of nursery stock, plant, 
ing, manuring, pruning, cultivating, harvesting and marketing 
every species of fruit, treated theoretically and practically, 
occupies the second term. Barry's Fruit Garden, corrected 
for our latitude, is used in this class. In the third term lec- 
tures are delivered upon political economy in its special rela- 
tions to the pursuit of agriculture ; the selection, purchase, 
equipment and management of a farm, the ratio between fixed 
and' working capital, the employment and management of 
labor etc. Landscape gardening, treated with special refer- 
' ence to the improvement of country homes, occupies the re- 
mainder of the session. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROF. LTJPTON. ASSISTANT, L. W. WILKINSON. 

Instruction in this department embraces— 

1. A course of lectures in General Chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in Industrial Chemistry. 

3. A course of lectures in Agricultural Chemistry. 

^ Systematic laboratory work in, copowtioo with oaob 
4 




50 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



coarse of lectures, for the practice of chemical analysis and 
chemical research. 

1. Course in General Chemistry: This consists of a series 
of lectures (three per week) extending throughout the entire 
session, and includes a discussion of the fundamental princi- 
ples of Chemical Philosophy in connection with the history, 
preparation, properties and compounds of the metallic and 
non-metallic elements, with the main facts and principles of 
Organic Chemistry. In this course the more common appli- 
cations of Chemistry to the Arls and Manufactures are dis- 
cussed. The apparatus used for experimental illustration is 
extensive, containing the newest and most approved instru- 
ments necessary for presenting the subject in the most at- 
tractive and instructive form. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cook's Chemi- 
cal Philosophy, Chemical Journals. r 

2. The lectures on Industrial Chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion in de- 
tail of the processes and chemical principles involved in the 
most important applications of Chemistry in the Arts and 
Manufactures to the reduction of ores, the preparation of ma- 
terials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, heating, illu- 
mination, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suitable 
specimens of raw materials and manufacturing products 
together with models and diagrams. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Wagner's Chemical Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as applied 
to Arts and Manufacturing, Ure's Dictionary, Watt's Dictionary, 
Richardson and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy. 

3. Coarse in Agricultural Chemistry : This consists of 
lectures on Chemistry in its applications to Agriculture (two 
per week), and includes a thorough discussion of the origin 
composition and classification of soils, the composition and 

growth of plants, the sources of plant food and how obtained. 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 51 

the improvement of soils, the manufacture and use of fertiliz- 
ers, the chemical principles involved in the rotation of crops, 
the feeding of live stock and the various operations carried on 
by the intelligent and successful agriculturist. 

BOOKS OF REFERENCE. 

Lupton's Elementary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson 
and Cameron's Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agricul- 
ture in relation with Chemistry, Scientific Journals, Reports of the 
United States Department of Agriculture, and the bulletins and re- 
ports of the various home and foreign Agricultural Department and 
Stations. 

4. The course of systematic Laboratory Work: This 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried on in con- 
nection with each course of lectures, and embraces the practi- 
cal operation of chemical analysis and synthesis, being varied 
somewhat to suit the individual object of the student. 

The laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
during six days in the week, are amply supplied with every- 
thing necessary for instruction in chemical manipulation, in 
the qualitative and quantitative analysis of soils, fertilizers, 
minerals, mineral waters, technical products, etc., and in the 
method of prosecuting chemical researches. Unusual facilities 
are offered to students who wish to devote their time to the 
special study of practical chemistry. 

Each student on # entering the Chemical Laboratory is fur- 
nished with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles, and the 
common re-agents and apparatus used in qualitative and quan- 
titative analysis. At the close of the session he will be credited 
with such articles as may be returned in good order; the 
value of those which have been injured or destroyed will be 
deducted from the deposit. 

BOOKS USED. 

In Qualitative Analysis— Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In Quantitative Analysis— Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, Rick- 
ett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. 

In Agricultural Chemical Analysis— Church, Frankland. Official 
methods Of the Association, of Agricultural Qh$m^te, 




52 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

CHEMICAL LABORATOKY. 



(For description of the building see page 15.) 

The Chemical Apparatus recently purchased for the new laboratory 
consists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for practical 
work and investigation. The building is supplied with water and gas 
and every appliance required to meet the demands of modern scien- 
tific instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus usually 
supplied to first class laboratories, a new and improved Schmidt and 
Hensch'sPolariscope has been imported, two short-arm Becker Bal- 
ances of latest pattern, Bunsen Spectroscope, Zeiss' Microscope, and 
other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 

ENGLISH AND LATIN. 

PROF. THACH. 

ENGLISH. 

In this department the students are carried through a sys- 
tematic course of study in the English Language and litera- 
ture. In the courses of study which do not include the ancient 
classics a full course in English is especially important. It 
is therefore designed, as much as the time allotted permits, 
to famihanze the students by frequent exercises with the 
standard authors of the language. 

The course of study is as follows • 

Freslnnan Class-Five hours a week; study of grammar, 

tnTbZ T 81 ^^ g6neral c ™P^°n, with fre- 

quent bnef papers illustrating the laws studied 

Whitney's Essentials, Lockwood's Lessons in Rhetoric 

Sophomore Class-Three hours a week ; study of style 
analysis of selections of prose and n^t™ / \. 7 ' 

literary and historic themes P * ^^ ""^ 0a 

class. ' Week 'y erases m declamation are required of this 

,i c^rH^Xn.ri 1 22 "t ° f E °- 

Logic, E.S.J.. g aod A «™»» Literature, 

■JS^srsA^s: "•"-»•' «** *•»* *** 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



53 



Senior Class. — Two hours a week, first term. Principles of 
criticism and study of English Classics ; second and third 
terms, Political Economy. Two hours a week, first and second 
terms, Mental Science ; third term, Moral Science. 

Shakespeare's Plays, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Wayland's Sci- 
ence of Wealth, Hickok's Mental Science, Gregory's Christian Ethics. 

Three original orations are required during the year of each student 
of the first and second classes. 

LATIN. 

The subjects taught in this department are the Latin Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

The modes of instruction are by translation from the Latin 
texts into English and from English into Latin. The constant 
use of blackboards adds much to the progress and accuracy of 

the student. 

A systematic course of exercises, illustrative of the princi- 
ples of Latin etymology and syntax, is carried on in connection 
with the reading of the authors prescribed. Special attention 
is given to English derivatives from the Latin, and to the cor- 
responding idioms of the two languages. 

The progress of the student is valued not so much by the 
number of books read, as by his ability to read Latin and ex- 
plain the principles of interpretation and construction. 

Latin authors read : 

Freshman Class.-Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Grammar and Composi- 

tion. 
Sophomore Class.-Cicero's Composition. 

Junior Class.-Tacitus, Horace, Selections from Latin poets and 

Prose writers, Classical Literature. 
Senior Class.-Cicero's Tusculan Disputations, Terrence, History of 

Latin Literature. 

MECHANIC ARTS. 

G. H. BRYANT, B. 8. DIRECTOR. 
J. J. WILMORE, B. A. BLAKEY, ASSISTANTS. 

The course in Manual Training covers three years as fol- 
lows: First year, wood-working-carpentry and turn.ng, 



f 



54 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



second year, pattern-making and foundry and forge work — 
moulding, casting and smithing ; third year, machine shop — 
chipping and filing and machine work in metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the three 
lower classes. For satisfactory reasons a student may be ex- 
cused from this laboratory work by the Faculty. 

The full work of each class is 8ix hours per week, in three 
exercises of two hours each. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 
from a twenty-five horse power Harris-Corliss automatic engine, which 
is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel horizontal tubular 
boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the feed water form a part of 
the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial brick boiler- 
house and chimney have been erected. 

The equipment for the wood-working shop comprises the following: 
20 double wood-working benches, each with complete set of carpenter's 
tools ; 20 turning-lathes, 10-inch swing, each with complete set of tools ; 
1 double circular saw; 1 band saw; 1 board-planing machine; 1 buzz 
planer; 2 scroll saws (power) , 1 large pattern-maker's lathe, 16-inch 
swing ; 1 36-inch grindstone. In addition to these, the tool room is 
supplied with a variety of extra hand-tools for special work. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of moulding-benches for 12 
students, each supplied with a complete set of moulder's tools ; a 14- 
inch cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of melting 1,000 
pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace in which can be melted 100 
pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, etc. Also a 
full supply of ladles, large and small moulding flasks, special tools, etc. 
The forge shop equipment consists of 16 hand forges of new pattern, 
each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast for all the forges 
is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower (which also 
furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No. 15 Sturtevant ex- 
haust blower draws the smoke from the fires into the smoke-flues and 
forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine tools in the machine department are as follows : 6 en- 
gine-lathes (screw-cutting), 14-inch swing, 6-foot bed; 2 engine-lathes, 
16-ineh swing (one with taper attachment) ; 1 speed lathe, 10-inch 
swing; 120-inch drill-press (power-feed); I 15-inch shaper; 1 22-inch 
x 22-inch x 5 foot friction planer; ] universal milling machine; 1 
corundum tool-binder (14-inch wheel); 1 bench grinding-machine 
small) ; 1 post drill press (14-inch). A part of this room is set apart 
for vise- work chipping and filing; and benches for 12 students are 
provided, each with vise and sets of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In 



the tool-room is to be found a good supply of machinists' tools for 



gen- 







\ ■ 



i 



.^x 



PL/N Of 

OF 

MECHANIC ARTS 

ALA. POLY. INST. 

SCALE tjt-l' 




A 


WORKBENCHES 


R 





0AN0 #AW 


S 


C 


ffCROli. SAW 


T 





fWTTEftfl LATHS 


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CIRCULAR 5AVf 


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X 


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SURFACE n 


V 


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DRILL PRESS 


z 


K 


EIUNG BENCHES 


a 


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ENQfNE LATHES 


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BEMCH GRINDER 


c 


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POST DRILL 


6 


p 


SHAPES 


* 


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FLANER 


9 




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k BENCHES 





Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



55 



eral shop use, such as lathe and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, 
dies, gauges, files, cutting and measuring tools, and special appliances 
for machine work, etc. 

The nature of the work in each department is as follows : 

First Year. 

I. A coursfe of carpentry (hand work covering the first 
term and part of the second, or about five months). 

The lessons include instruction on the nature and use of 
tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary 
work with plane, saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, timber- 
splices, cross joints, mortise and tenon, mitre and frame work, 
dovetail work, comprising different kinds of joints used in 
cabinet making, light cabinet work, examples in building, 
framing, roof-trusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning, extending through the three 
months of the third term. The lessons comprise, first, nature 
and use of lathe and tools, plain straight turning caliper work 
to different diameters and lengths, simple and compound 
curves, screw plate and chuck-work, hollow and spherical 

turning. 

Second Year. 

I A course in pattern-making, covering the first half of 
the first term. The work includes a variety of examples of 
whole and split patterns, core work, etc., giving the students 
familiarity with the use of patterns for general moulding 

II. A course in moulding and casting in iron and brass 
occupying ten weeks. The work consists for the most par o 
smairJcles, such as light machine parts but a „tat 
varietv of forms are introduced for the student to acquire a 

and some three part flask and some dry sand work » intro 



56 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

or more complicated work. Instruction and practice is given 
in working the cupola, each student in turn taking charge of a 
melting. 

III. A course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying 
the remainder of the year. The lessons are arranged so that 
the students, in making the series of objects, become familiar 
with the nature of the metals and the successive steps in work- 
ing them by hand into simple and complex forms, as drawing, 
upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, welding by various 
methods, tool-forging, tempering, hardening, etc. • 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lectures 
is given on the metallurgy and working of the metals used in 
the industrial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, etc, 

Third Year. 

I. A course in chipping and filing covering the first term. 
The lessons comprise work on cast and wrought iron ; chip- 
ping to line on flat and curved surfaces, key-seating, etc.; filing 
and finishing to line (straight and curved), surface filing and 
finishing, fitting, slotting, dovetail work, sliding and tight fits, 
sawing, pin, screw and key filing, surface finishing with scra- 
per, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the year. 
The work includes cast and wrought iron, steel and brass : 
turning to various diameters and lengths, taper turning, facing 
with chuck and face plate, drilling—both in lathe and drill 
press— reaming, boring, screw-cutting in lathe and with taps 
and dies, planing, slotting, etc., with planer and shaper, milling 
various forms with the milling machine, fitting, grinding, 
polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various subjects 
connected with machine work in metals : Such as forms,'con- 
struction and use of the various machines, cutting tools, 'gear- 
ing, gauges, screw threads, etc. During the last term some 
piece of construction work is given the classes. 

Instruction is generally given, first, by black-board drawings 
or sketches which the student copies, with dimensions in note- 



i — ipiMhl — ■ ■ — - 1 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 57 

book with which each one provides himself ; thus each one 
works from his own notes. This is supplemented, whenever 
necessary, by the actual construction of the lesson by the in- 
structor before the class, second by inspection and direction at 
the bench by the instructor. . 

Students desiring to pursue the study of applied mechanics I 

beyond the above course will take a special course of Steam 
and Mill Engineering, supplemented by experiment and prac- 
tice with the apparatus, including steam generation and the 
forms, construction and use of steam-boilers and accompanying 
apparatus; steam as a motive power, and forms, construction 
and use of the steam engine, with the study and use of the 
indicator; transmission of power-shafting, belting, gearing, 
etc. ; also elementary theoretical mechanism. 

BIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR ATKINSON. 

ElmmMry Mo-w.-Three bum a week during tbe 
.econd term will be gi.en to lb. f.e.bn,.n eta «pon * * 
mentary principle, of biology. The cooree will M»J" •*•- 
lie"" *e Omental physiological {«**£;*£ 
»nH „l«nt life Tbe lectures will be supplemented by <«peri 
"2E2L3L and mleruecopic H*> ■«*»■ tbe 

C 'TwM M«c4W eubjec. i. pre- Jj*g- 

i,t,y. Tbe first part of the year _mu rf 

„, fungi giengprun..»cu««e'b o «wl (| ^ ^^ ^ 

cultivated plants. lnis win oe *\ _ Affriettltow. 

insects, including tho* in jurio* '**?**£& * «*.- 
Special attention will be given to methods employea 

big the attacks of fungi „d ^^ Ksses. The 

The reference books will be announced. _ 

department contains a carefully se ectd lib ry ^ 

ard works on biology and many rare ana _ 
sides current periodicals adapted to aid in P 
gations carried on in the laboratory. 



58 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

MODERN LANGUAGES AND HISTORY. 

i 

C. H. BAKNWELL, JR., ADJUNCT PROFESSOR. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

The following regular courses are given in French and 
German : 

French. — First Year : Three recitations a week. During 
this year the principal object is to acquire a thorough knowl- 
edge of the elements of grammar, and a correct pronunciation, 
together with facility in translating ordinary French. Read- 
ing is begun at an early stage, and the principles of grammar 
are illustrated and impressed by frequent exercises in render- 
ing English into French. 

Second Year : Three recitations a week. During this year, 
the same line of work is pursued as that begun in the previous 
year. More difficult and varied French is read, and careful 
instruction is given upon the laws of grammar and the con- 
struction of the language. 

German.— Two Years: Three recitations a week the first 
year, three a week the second year. In this course the aim 
and the methods are similar to those in French. 

Special Courses.— In addition to these regular courses, addi- 
tional classes are formed for special study in the literature, or 
for special study in any particular direction desired, when the 
number of students desiring it is sufficient. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

French-First Year : Joynes-Otto's French Grammar and Intro- 
ductory Reader. 

Second Year : Super's French Reader; Jeanne d'Arc, and d'Avare 
Heath's French Dictionary recommended. 

German-First Year: Joynes-Meissne'r's German Grammar, and 
Joyne's Reader, ' 

HS n a d p Year: n aU 5 8 Karavane > Peter Scblemihl, Die Journalisten, 
Heath s derman Dictionary recommended. 

HISTORY. 
In this department the aim is not so much to memorize 
facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is laid on the 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 59 

fact that History is not a succession of isolated facts, but a 
progressive whole, each event being at once the cause and the 
effect of other events. This causal relation of events is closely 
studied and the students are taught to investigate for them- 
selves the growth of ideas, and to trace particularly their de- 
velopment in the United States, so as to acquire a practical 
knowledge of the history and present workings of our govern- 
ment and institutions. The knowledge acquired is rendered 
clear and permanent by frequent comparison of customs and 
Tws, and also by diagrams, charts and maps. Instruction is 
ffiven by lectures and text-books. 

g The course covers two years, and embraces the History of 
the United States, studies on our government and its institu- 
tions, and on general history. 



TEXT-BOOKS. 



First Year: Johnston's U. 8. History, and Swinton's "Outlines of 
tlS TS^ MedUeval and Modern Histor, 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

„„„.,„ TT q ARMY, Commandant. 

lieut. J. b. Mcdonald, u. s. ak.«, 

Military Science and Titles are require^ »££ - 
this institution by law- This bj * ! ^ ^ ^ 

imparting to each f^^gg* the Soldier, of the 
arms, practical instruct^ jin the S hoo. o ^ ^ 

Company and of the Battalion , also in 

spections, Dress ^^BE*"* * ^ " 

Under section 1225, U. b. « accoUt rements and two 

provided with ^W-rf-^ for practice firing i8 

pieces of field artillery. * MDerie nced officer. 

used under the direction of an epm ^ 

The following uniform of rtandar ^ ^ rf 

been prescribed for dress, viz.. w> ^ cap 

West Point, with sack coat for fatogoe, 0^ ^ ^ |lg 

A neat and serviceable uniform c » tap ^.^ M 

to $19. This is \«7^ r Ve t Uniform during the session, 
students are required to wear wi 



60 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



The entire body of students is divided into companies. The 
officers are selected for proficiency in drill, deportment and 
studies. Each company is officered by one Captain, two 1st 
Lieutenants, one 2d Lieutenant, and with a proper number of 
Corporals. The officers and non-commissioned officers are dis- 
tinguished by appropriate insignia of rank. These appoint- 
ments are confirmed by the President on nomination of the 
Commandant. 

The Junior Class recites once a week in the United States 
Infantry Tactics. 

The Senior Class recites once a week in "Notes on Military 
Science." 

POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 

There are three Post-Graduate Degrees— MASTER OF SCIENCE 
MINING ENGINEER and CIVIL ENGINEER. 

A Post Graduate Degree may be obtained by a graduate of 
this College, or of any other institution of equal grade, by one 
year's residence at the College, spent in the successful prose- 
cution of a course of study in applied science prescribed by 
the Faculty. J 

Candidates must also present to the Faculty a satisfactory 
thesis, showiug independent investigation upon some subject 
pertaining to their course of study, and must pass a satisfac- 
tory examination on the course of study prescribed. The ex- 
amination is written, and also oral, in presence of the Faculty. 

Applicants for Post-Graduate Degrees are, by order of the 
Board, permitted to matriculate without payment of fees. 

They are subject to the general regulations as other students, 
but are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates, who are not candidates for a degree, are 
permitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in any de- 
partment of the College, except chemical laboratory, without 
payment of regular fees. 




- — 



ssaH^^ 



i 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 61 

Distinctions. 

Distinctions are awarded in the different subjects of each 
class to those students whose grade for the entire year is above 

90 per cent. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on Com- 
mencement day to those who obtain an average of 90 per 
cent, in all the prescribed studies of a regular class, and also 
lo those who obtain three distinctions in the freshman class, 
four in the sophomore or junior class, and five in the senior 
class, provided they have satisfactorily passed all the regular 
examinations of that session. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 

During the second term there will be given by Professor 
Mell a course of twelve lectures on photography. This course 
will be elective, and the instruction will be opened to any 
student who may desire to learn how to make picture . It 
will be necessary for each student to provide himself with an 
outfit that will cost from $11.50 to $16.00. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are 
kept by the officers of- instruction. 
From the record a monthly circular, or statement, is sent 

the parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written recitations, or monthly ~*ffr£? "*~ 
of the month, are held at the opt or ^JJgJSU* or 

At the end of each term written or om 
both, are held on the studies , passed ] >™^J ^ Faculty , 

Special examinations are held on y by o 
and in no case will private examinations be P ^ ^ ^ 

Students falling below the m.m«n m gr ^ ^ ^ 
amination, can be promoted to full stan g ^ ^ 

class, only on satisfactory examinat.ons at P 

next session. 



62 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

It is required that every student who enters the College 
shall remain through the examinations at the end of the term. 
Leaves of absence and honorable discharges will, therefore not 
be granted within six weeks of the examination, except in ex- 
treme cases. 

Examinations for degrees, or certificates of proficiency, em- 
brace the entire subject of study in the course. 

LIBRARY. 

A commodious room in the new building has been appro- 
priated to the library. It is designed to make it an important 
educational feature of the college. At present it contains a 
number of valuable reference books, books of the standard 
authors, and others suitable for students. It is open daily, 
when students are permitted to select books under prescribed 
regulations. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the Pres 
ident and Faculty, in accordance with the code of laws and" 
regulations enacted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study, and punctuality in attendance on recita- 
tions a „d all other duties, are required of every student. 

Students are not allowed to have in their possession weapons 
or arms not issued for the performance of military duty. 

MILITARY DRILL. 
JSSL tafaS "PS! mi, !f a 7 dri "« each week, and all under- 

^^^s^^jz^r no « ips - Themi,i - 

^^^^S^^^ -ident Iron, all 
permitted to matriculate and devotlthdr hL? ^ ° f 8ge ' Wh ° are 
Chemistry, agriculture, etc ™ *""* *° ™* S P eci * st » d 7> * 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 63 

KELIGIOUS SERVICE. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and also 
to attend the church of their choice at'least once on Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes 
every Sunday. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized, and through its 
weekly meetings exerts a wholesome Christian influence among 
the students of the College. 

LOCATION. 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, fifty-nine 
miles east of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Railroad. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general good 
health and freedom from malaria, having an elevation of eight 
hundred and twenty-one feet above tide water. By statute of 
the State, the sale of spirituous liquors and keeping saloons 
of any kind are forbidden. 

' THESIS. 

Each Applicant for a degree is required to write and submit 
to the Faculty a thesis on a subject of immediate relation to 
some study of his course, and deliver the same at Commence- 
ment, if required by the Faculty, 

This thesis must be given to the f rotessor 01 g j 

the first of May. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES.. 

There are two Literary Societies > connected jith .to > Col- 
lege -the Wirt and Websterian. Each has a hall m the col 

X:: 1 Sties hold celebrations on the events of Thanks- 
giving Day and the 22d of February, and also Commence 



64 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



merit week. They elect annually, with the approval of the 
Faculty, an orator to represent them at the close of the year. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel ser- 
vices, oratorical exercises in declamation and in original ora- 
tions are conducted by the Professor of English, in presence 
of the Faculty and students. 

The first and second terms the students of the sophomore 
class are exercised in declamation. 

The second term the members of the junior class deliver 
original orations. 

The third term the members of the senior class read essays 
or deliver origiual orations. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The Annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the society, 
is delivered in the chapel during Commencement week. The 
following are the officers of the society: 

T. H. Frazer, M. D. President. 

J. C. Street, Vice President. 

C. C. Thach, Treasurer and Secretary. 

BOARDING. 

The College has no barracks nor dormitories, and the students 
board with the families of the town of Auburn, and thus en- 
joy all the protecting arid beneficial influences of the family 
circle. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it is 
to report those who, without permission, leave their rooms 
after the "call to quarters," or are guilty of any violation of 
order. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not per- 
mitted to make changes without obtaining permission from the 
President, and this permission is given onlv at the close of a 
term, except for special reaaons, 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 65 

EXPENSES. 

Incidental fee, per half session $2 50 

Library fee, per half session 1 00 

Surgeon's fee, per half session . 2 50 

Board per month, with fuel and lights. . .' $12 to 15 00 

These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and $6.00 on 
February 1st. By order of the Board no fees can be remitted. 

There is no charge for tuition. 

For students entering after January 1st, the fees for half 
session only are required. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be deposited 
by each student on matriculation, to cover any special or gen- 
eral damage to college property for which he may be liable. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent fee, 
or the unexpended balance, will be refunded to the student. 

AMOUNT OF DEPOSIT. 

Each student on entering College should deposit with the 
Treasurer not less than $50.00, to pay the expenses of fees, 
one month's board, uniform, books, etc. 

UNIFORM. 

A uniform of Cadet gray cloth is prescribed which all 
undergraduate students are required to wear during the session. 
The uniforms are made at Auburn, of cloth manufactured at 
the Chartottsville mills. The suit including cap, costs about 
$19.00 ; the dress coat $10.00 to $11.00. It is neat and service- 
able and lees expensive than ordinary clothing. 

SURGEON. 

The Surgeon is required to be present at the College daily, 
to vi«t the Cadets at their quarters who are reported sick, and 
5 




_ 



________ 



wmmm 



66 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

to give all requisite medical attention without other charge 
than the regular Surgeon's fee, paid on entering College. 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the Treasurer of 
the College a 1! funds desired for sons or wards, whether for regular 
charges of College fees or board, or for any other purpose. It is the 
duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed in his hands, and to 
pay all expenses incurred by the students, including board, uniform, 
books, etc., when approved. 

When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treasurer of the 
College by the cadet to pay his necessary expenses. These checks 
are paid only when approved by the President. This approval is given 
only for necessary expenses, as stated in the Catalogue, unless specially 
requested in writing by the parent. 

The College cannot be held responsible for the expenses of a student, 
unless the funds are deposited with the Treasurer. No student should 
be permitted to have a large amount of pocket money, as it only brings 
trouble and encourages idleness. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

The Academic Year commences on Wednesday, 16th Sep- 
tember (second Wednesday after first Monday), and ends on 
Wednesday, 16th June (the second Wednesday after the first 
Monday), which is Commencement day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends from 
the opening of the session to the 23d of December ; the second 
term begins December 31st and ends March 27th ; the third 
terra continues from March 27th to the close of the session. 



RESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 

The following resolution was adopted by the Trustees : 

thJS n "Ta ° f ? !feilied faCiliHeS f0r in8tr «ction in Agriculture and 
l^r ^ V T M * ° f education now » ossess ed by this College, 

court nS* PraChCal mstruction * md U8W al poience in tip 
course of education now provided for, 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



67 



DONATIONS TO LIBRARY. 

Secretary of the Interior— Senate and House Reports, Mineral Re- 
sources, Consular Reports, Geological Survey, Ordinance Report, 
Bureau of Ethnology, Geodetic Survey, etc., 60 vols. 

Hon. John T. Morgan, Public Documents, 5 vols. 

Hon. James L. Pugh, Public Documents, 7 vols. 

Hon. W. C. Oates, War of Rebellion, Congressional Record, 10 vols. 

Hon. Robert Porter, Superintendent of Census, Bulletins, etc. 

Hon. W. T. Harris, Commissioner of Education, Pamphlets, etc., 6 
vols. 

U. S. Geodetic Survey, 11 vols. 



CALENDAR 1891-92. 

Session begins Wednesday, Sept. 16 

Examination for admission Wednesday, Sept. 16 

First term begins Wednesday, Sept 16 

First term ends . . Wednesday, Dec. 23 

Second term begins Thursday, Dec. 31 

Second term ends Saturday, March 27 

Third term begins Monday, March 29 

Sophomore class exercises Saturday, May 1 

Final examinations begin Monday, May 24 

Commencement sermon Sunday, June 13 

Annual meeting of Trustees Monday, June 14 

Military exercises Monday, June 14 

Celebration of Literary Societies 8 p. m Monday, June 14 

Junior class celebration Tuesday, June 15 

Alumni oration . . . . Tuesday, June 15 

Address before Literary societies 8 p. m Tuesday, June 15 

Commencement day .Wednesday, June 16 



1891. 
1891. 
1891. 
1891. 
1891. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892, 
1892. 




AGRICULTURAL 

^EXPERIMENT * STRTIONh- 



—OF THE— 



AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE 



—OF — 



ALABAMA. 



\ 



♦ 






/ 







OFFICERS 



OF THE 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 



/ 



■ • ♦ 



BOARD OF VISITORS. 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION I 

Hon. J. G. Gilchrist,. . ..Hon. R. F. Ligon,. ..fHoN. J. B. Mitchell. 



OFFICERS OF THE STATION. 

„, ' „ m President 

W. L. Broun 

J. 8. Newman Director and Agriculturist 

N. T. Lupton • Vice-Director and Chemist 

S W \, * Botanist 

P. H. Mell* ; . 

. „ Biologist 

G. F. Atkinson 

ASSISTANTS. 

Isaac Ross, First Asst. Agriculturist in Charge of Live Stock and Dairy 

J AS . Clayton Second Assistant A ^ ulturist 

J. T. Anderson, Ph.D.. First Assistant Chennst 

L W. Wilkinson, M. Sc • • Second Assistant Chemist 

t> Qn .Third Assistant Chemist 
J. F. Wilkinson, B. Sc " 1IU 

_ ^ T u «„ . ... Fourth Assistant Chemist 

R. E. Noble, B. be • xu 

D G „ Assistant Botanist 

A. M. Lloyd, B. be 

*Prof. Mell has charge of the Meteorological Observations. 
■{- Deceased. 



jtr 




AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

In this department every variety of experiment with field crops, 
grasses, vegetables and fruits calculated to benefit the farmers of the 
State have been conducted, or are in progress. Worn and gullied 
lands have been brought into profitable cultivation, and swamps 
drained. 

For the purpose of learning the chemical needs of the various typical 
soils of the State, chemicals, for experiment, have been furnished forty- 
three experimenters cultivating the different typical soils in every part 
of the State. These are furnished by the Station ready for application 
to the experiment plots, free of charge to the experimenters who vol- 
unteer to do the work according to printed instructions furnished by 
the Station. In addition to these an alumnus of the College is con- 
ducting upon his own lands an elaborate set of special nitrogen, potash 
and intercultural experiments with chemicals furnished by the Station. 
Varieties of seed have also been furnished a number for experimental 
comparison upon different soils. Varieties of grapes, Strawberries and 
raspberries have also been gratuitously distributee! to the experi- 
menters for the purpose of learning what varieties may be profitably 
grown under the great variety of conditions of soil, climate and eleva- 
tion presented in Alabama. Crops have been planted with special 
reference to facilitating research by the Chemist, Botanist and Biologist. 
The Station has a large house for milch cows, a model dairy with 
modern appliances, a gin-house with milling room, barn and stable, 
two silos, with 15-horse power engine. It also has the residence of the 
professor and general office, with storage rooms, etc. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

The Chemical Department of the Agricultural Experiment Station, 
in connection with the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Ala- 
bama, includes in its present organization, the Chemist in charge and 

four assistants. 

In addition to the work directly connected with the Station, the 
Chemist is Professor of general and Agricultural Chemistry in the Ag- 



ti Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

ricultural and Mechanical College, and official Chemist of the State 
Department of Agriculture. On the application of the Commissioner 
of Agriculture, he is required to "analyze and certify the analysis of 
all fertilizers, samples of which are furnished him." The variety and 
extent of this work, which has greatly increased during the past year, 
can be seen from the following tabular statement of the number and 
character of quantitative analyses made during the year ending April 
1st, 1891. In the analyses of commercial fertilizers, only those constitu- 
ents are determined which the State law requires, viz : Water soluble, 
citrate soluble and acid soluble phosphoric acid, nitrogen and potash. 
Analyses made during the year from April 1st, 1890, to April 1st, 1891. 

No. of Samples. 

Acid phosphates with nitrogen and potash 185 

Acid phosphates with potash 11 

Acid phosphates 75 

Natural phosphates 26 

Marls 2 

Tankage , 26 

Cotton seed meal 17 

Muriate of potash 13 

Bone meal i 5 

Dried blood 3 

Bat manure. 2 

Coal ashes ; 1 

Kainite ,, k ; i 

Sodium nitrate 1 

Cotton seed hull ashes 2 

Compost 1 

Iron ores 2 

Limestone 2 

Feed stuffs 6 

Sorghum 63 

Milk .!.-^!!!!!Ll^!!!; v !!!' 37 

Butter 37 

Total 518 

In addition to the quantitative work, a large number of mineralogi- 
cal specimens, the character of which could be ascertained by mere in- 
spection or by simple qualitative tests, have been examined and their 
value determined. 

Two bulletins have been prepared and issued during the year, em- 
bracing in detail the results of analyses of commercial fertilizers and 
other substances, in addition to discussions of subjects of interest to 
the farmers of the State. The first of these bulletins on "nitrogen as a 



: 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



75 



fertilizer," embraces a discussion of nitrogen as plant food, its sources 
in vegetation and its accumulation by plants, especially by pea vines, 
the value of which as a fertilizer is discussed in connection with 
original determinations of the amount of phosphoric acid, nitrogen and 
potash contained in the vines and roots. The results show the great 
value of this important natural fertilizer in restoring fertility to worn 
and exhausted soils. 

The second bulletin contains a discussion of the composition of milk 
and butter ^with special reference to the effects of feeding on cotton 
seed and cotton seed meal. Twenty-seven analyses of these dairy fc pro- 
ducts, derived from different feed stuffs, show an increase in the melt- 
ing point and a corresponding diminution in the volatile acids of the 
butter produced by feeding on the substances mentioned. 

FACILITIES FOR WORK. 

The new building for the Department of Chemistry is complete in its 
arrangements, and admirably adapted to meet the growing demands of 
modern progress in this department of science. In this building, a 
description of which is given in this Catalogue, is located the State 
Chemical Laboratory, where all the chemical work of the Experiment 
Station is carried on. Care has been taken to secure the best form of 
work tables, niches, hoods, etc. Gas, water and other conveniences 
and necessaries for effective work are abundantly supplied. 

The equipment is the best that can be secured from manufacturers in 
this country and in Europe. In addition to the apparatus usually 
found in chemical laboratories, and especially where soils, feed stuffs, 
and dairy products are analyzed and their properties investigated, may 
be mentioned — 

Schmidt and Hansen's Polariscope. 
Zeiss' Microscope. 
Zeiss' Refractometer. ' 
Spectroscope. 
Becker's Balances. 

Also, a new and special arrangement for carrying on, at the same 
time, a number of nitrogen determinations by the Kjeldahl method. 

The Library of the Experiment Station contains a large number of 
standard works of reference, and is supplied with the principal Ameri- 
can, English, French, and German chemical journals. 



^u 






— ^M^WM 




76 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND METEOROLOGY. 



/*■' 



The work in this department of the station is specially devoted to in- 
vestigations in phanerogamous plants, and observations of meteorologi- 
cal instruments. 

The laboratory for botanical work consists of the following apparatus : 
• One Zeiss microscope, No. Ila, with apochromatic objectives, with 
the equivalent focus in m m of 16.0, 8 0, 4 0, and one homogeneous 
immersion of 2 0, the series of compensating oculars of 2, 4, 0, 8, 12, 
18, and Zeiss projection eye piece for photographing objects ; camera 
lucida after Abbe ; sliding objection-changers; Abbe condenser ; Goni- 
ometer eye piece ; eye piece micrometer ; stage micrometer ; polarizers. 

Four Leitz microscopes for students, containing objectives 3 and 7, 
oculars 1 and 3. 

Twelve Acme Students microscopes with objectives 1, %> 1-5 inches, 
and oculars to suit. 

Two Bausch & Lombs compact dissecting and mounting microscopes. 

One Bausch & Lombs Laboratory microtome. 

One King's microtome. 

One Bausch & Lomb Professional photo*micro camera, with bellows 
to extend eight feet, containing mechanical stage, achromatic amplifier, 
1 inch objective. 

Bull's eye condenser, lens 3 inches diameter. 

A well equipped dark room with all the appliances for complete pho- 
tographic operations. 

One camera fitted with Clark's Rapid Rectilinear lens List No. li 
with Bausch & Lombs, Diaphragm Shutter. 

The laboratory contains besides the above all the vessels and smaller 
instruments needed for investigations in botany. 

The meteorological observatory is supplied with : 

One maximum thermometer. 

One minimum thermometer. 

One wet and dry bulb hygrometer. 

Three sets of soil thermometers, ranging in depth from one to ninety- 
six inches. 

One solar radiator thermometer. 

One terrestrial thermometer. 

One Barometer. 

One Anemometer, with electrical recorder. 

One Anemoscope. 

One rain gauge. 




_— 



w~ 



7 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



77 



The United State Signal Service has detailed an observer (Mr. J. M. 
Quarles) to act as assistant in Meteorological work at this station, and 
through the aid of the National Service about thirty sets of instruments 
have been secured for as many different sub-stations throughout Ala- 
bama. The observers in charge of these stations report to the College 
at regular intervals throughout the year, and during the crop seasons 
special crop bulletins, indicating the effects of the weather on the grow- 
ing crops, are issued each week, prepared from the data sent in by 
these observers. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY. 



During the year three bulletins and two circular letters have been 
prepared from this department as follows : 

Circular Letter No. 1, May 14, 1890, sent to one hundred farmers of 
the State requesting their experience in the application of the dry pois- 
ons (Paris green and London purple), by dusting it through osnaburg 
bags suspended from a pole. 

Circular Letter No. 2, August, 1890, sent to one hundred farmers in 
the State requesting specimens and notes on the diseases of cotton, 
variously termed "rust," "red rust," ''black rust," "Frenching," etc. 

Bulletin No. 15, April, 1890.— Insecticides ; kerosene emulsion; how 

to make and apply it. 

Bulletin No. 17, July, 1890.— Dry application of Paris green and Lon- 
don purple for the cotton worm. The replies to circular letter No. 1 
were made the basis of this bulletin. 

Bulletin No. 21, December, 1890.— A new root rot disease of cotton. 
A description of root rot of cotton caused by the root-gall nemotode, 
ffetrodera radioicola, with photograph illustrating the disease. Atten- 
tion is directed to the danger of the present reckless distribution of this 
nematode in the roots and tubers of various plants. 

There is also a popular description of the worm and its habits. 

The special work of the Biologist is phytopathology, or the study of 
the diseases of plants. 

The department is now engaged especially in studying the diseases 
of the cotton plant. From personal inspection and careful observation 
in the field and study in the laboratory, including also material sent in 
from a number of farmers in the State in answer to circular letter No. 2 
a bulletin is now ready to be issued upon the diseases popularly called 
"black rust." In it are considered the external characters of the dis- 
ease, the fungi causing it, the progress of the disease, and various cur- 




207875 



T 



^^ 



78 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



rent theories regarding the cause. It is illustrated with photographs 
of the diseased leaves and pen sketches of the most injurious fungi 
concerned. 

A new fungous disease of cotton termed "Authracnose of cotton" has 
also been carefully studied and a bulletin will soon be issued upon the 
subject. 

During the spring experiments were made to test the efficacy of cer- 
tain fungicides for black rot of grapes. The Bordeaux Mixture and the 
Ammoniacal carbonate of copper were the principal ones experimented 
with. 

The Bordeaux Mixture was successful to a very satisfactory degree, 
but the Ammoniacal carbonate of copper did not present any beneficial 
results. 

A large number of fungi on grasses, fruit trees, forest trees, etc., 
have been collected and placed in the cabinet of the department for use. 
in offering instruction and as the basis for other bulletins of economic 
interest. 

In the laboratory the gelatine and agar agar method of Studying mi- 
cro-organisms is being made a special feature of the work, applying the 
methods to the handling and culture of fungi, and already promises 
important results in determining the economic importance of certain 
fungi as well as giving us a clearer insight into their habits and poly- 
morphism. 

Facilities for Work. 

At present three rooms are occupied by the department — an office, 
lecture room and laboratory. The office contains the cabinent of fungi, 
the technical library for the department, slate table with a Zeiss micro- 
scope, reagents, gas and water fittings. The work in the office consists 
of the examination, indentification and cataloguing of the specimens 
of fungi, beside the special work peculiar to such an office. The cabi^ 
net is provided with tight drawers, for receiving the mounted speci- 
mens of fungi. 

The technical portion of the Experiment Station library in the office 
of the Biologist contains a number of valuable works of reference 
special reports, &e. 

Laboratory.— Five slate top tables are devoted to the use of stu- 
dents, there being 10 Leitz microscopes set apart for them. 

A small culture room contains the pjate and teche cultures of fungi 
and bacteria which are being studied in relation to the plant diseases 
they cause. Here they can be handled and studied with little danger 
of contamination from the dust of the laboratory. In this room is 
kept a Rohrbeck Thermostat fitted with automatic cut off burner and 
Lautenseblager's mo3t recent electric thermoregulator for maintaining 
constant temperatures, 







■M 



Mi 



Catalogue of the State 
Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of 
Alabama. 



1891 



1 



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► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
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► 10 246 10 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
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► 11 246 10 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
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► 12 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama f 

Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, I 

21 v. ; *c 21 cm. I 

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CATALOGUE 



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Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 



1891-92. 



N AUBUI?N, ALABAMA. 



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MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA; 

BROWN fglNTING CO., PRINTERS, BINDERS AND STATIONERS, 

1892. 



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BOAl?D OF TRUSTEES. 



His Excellency Thomas G. Jones, President ex-officio. 

J. G. Harris, Superintendent of Education. ex-officio. 



J. G. Gilchrist , (term expires 1897). 

M. L ? St ansel (term expires 1897). 

0. C. Harris (term expires 1897). 



Montgomery. 
. . Carrdllton. 
Decatur. 



/ 



Jonathan Haralson — (term expires 1895) \ . . . Selm 

E. F. Ligon (term expires 1895 . Tuskegee. 

John W. Bishop (term expires 1895) Talladega. 



R. F. Kolb (term expires 1893) Eufaula. 

C. H. Lindsay (term expires 1893). Mobile. 

H, C^ay Armstrong. (term expires 1893) Auburn. 



E. T. Glenn, Treasurer. | F. M. Reese, Secretary. 



^ 



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^ 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



Wm. LeROY BROUN, M. A. LL. D., 

President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, M. E., Ph. P., 

Professor of Natural History and Geology. 

JAMES H. LANE, C. E., A. M., LL. D., 

\ Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

CHARLES C. THACH, A. M., 

Professor of English and Latin. 

N. T. LUPTON, A. M., M. D., LL. D., 

Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

GEORGE F. ATKINSON, Ph. B., 

Professor of Biology. 

GEORGE PETRIE, M. A., Ph. D., 

» 

N Professor of History and Latin. 

Lieut: J. H. WILLS, 22nd Infantiy, U. S. A. (West Point), 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 

A. J. BONDURANT, A. M., 

Professor of Agriculture and Agriculturist of Experiment Station. 

CHARLES H. BARNWELL, A. M., 
Adjunct Professor of Modem Languages and History. 

A. F. MoKISSICK, A. M., 
Adjunct Profmor of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, 



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J. J. WILMORE, M. E., 

Acting Director of Laboratory , and Instructor of Mechanic Arts. 

C. A. CARY, D. V. S., 

Lecturer on Veterinary Science. 

L. W. WILKINSON, M. Sc, 
Assistant in Chemical Laboratory. 

B. A. BLAKEY, M. Sc, 
B. H. CRENSHAW, M. Sc, 

Assistant Instructors in Mechanic Arts. 

H. C. Armstrong, Jr., B. Sc Assistant Librarian. 

L. E. Baker, B. Sc. Assistant in Drawing. 

H.Benton, B. Sc Assistant in Agriculture. 

S. J. Buckalew, B. Sc Assistant in Mathematics and English. 

J. S. Clark, B. Sc Assistant in Botany. 

B. M. Duogar, B. Sc Assistant in Biology. 

C. B. Glenn, B. Sc Assistant in English. 

C. C. Johnson, B. Sc Assistant in Mathematics. 

F. A. Lupton, B. Sc Assistant in Chemistry. 

W. A. Marshall, B. Sc Assistant in Physics. 

A. D. McLennan, B. Sc Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

J. H. Drake, M. D Surgeon. 

C. C. Thach Librarian and Recording Secretary. 

0. D. Smith ? Corresponding Secretary. 



f 



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OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 



BOABD OF VISITORS. 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Hon. J. G. Gilchrist Hope Hull. 

Hon. R. F. Ligon. . i Montgomery . 

Hon. H. Clay Armstrong Auburn. 

BOABD OF DIBBCTIOK. 

Wm. LeRoy Broun President. 

A. J. Bondurant Agriculturist. 

N.T. Lupton Chemist. 

P. H. Mell *. . . Botanist and Meteorologist. 

Geo. F. Atkinson . . . Biologist. 

0. A. Cary,D.V. S. Veterinarian. 

assistants : 

James Clayton Assistant Agriculturist. 

J. T. Anderson, Ph. D First Assistant Chemist. 

L. W. Wilkinson, M. Sc Second Assistant Chemist. 

R. E. Noble, B, Sc Third Assistant Chemist. 

C. L. Hare, B. Sc Fourth Assistant Chemist. 

G. S. Clark Clerk, and Assistant Botanist. 




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OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 



-♦-♦- 



The leading object of the College, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, is to 
teach the principles and the applications of science. 

In its course of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that re- 
late to agriculture and the mechanic arts ; and at the same 
time the discipline obtained by the study of languages and 
other sciences is not neglected. 

All students are required to stu/iy the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to students in any 
course. 

The special or technical instruction given is thus based 
on a sound, general education. 

The College, in fact, is a distinctive school of industrial 
science — or Polytechnic Institute — a title which by reso- 
lution of the trustees is permitted to be inscribed otf the 
catalogue — and work of great value to the youth of the State 
is now being accomplished by fitting them, by a thorough 
science- discipline, in which manual training in the lower 
classes is made a prominent feature, for the successful and 
honorable performance of the responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline of 
the students in endeavoring to train them to habits of accu- 
rate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them for the 
duties of life, their moral and Christian training will always 
constitute the prominent care and thought of the Faculty. 




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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



LABOBATORIES AND FACULTIES FOE INSTRUC- 
TION. 



-♦•♦-■ 



The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory 
instruction in applied science in the following departments : 

I. — IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres %nd is supplied with illustra- 
ted specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in con- 
nection with the College, where experiments and scientific 
investigations relating to agriculture are daily made, affords 
unusual opportunities to students to become familiar with 
agriculture, its defects and remedies. 7 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where lec- 
tures are delivered in presence of the objects discussed, and 
during the year exercises in practical agriculture of an edu- 
cational character are given the students who enter upon 
this course of study. 

II. — IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of Mechanic Arts is used ap an auxiliary 
in industrial education, as a school of manual training in the 
arts- that constitute the foundation of various industrial pur- 
suits. The work performed by the students is instructive 
in character, as in any other laboratory, and the classes are 
taught in sections by a series of graded lessons under the 
supervision of the professor. In the lower classes of the 
College each student enters this school, and is assigned 
three exercises a week, each exercise being two hours long. 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade, but 
to educate, to discipline and train the eye and the hand, as 
well as the mind, and thus by associating manual and mental 



^ 



^p 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 9 

training, to thoroughly educate the student for the duties of 
life, whatever his vocation may be. There is no attempt to 
teach students special skill in constructing articles of com- 
mercial value, but all the exercises are systematically ar- 
ranged and designed for purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall 
90 x 50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse power 
Corliss engine, with indicator, a planer, circular saw, hand- 
saw, two scroll saws, a buzz planer, twenty-four stands with 
lathe and full set of lathe tools for each, and thirty benches 
for carpenter work with the tools requisite for construction. 

A brick building, 30 x 87 feet with two rooms, has been 
constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with sixteen forges and tools re- 
quired for a forge department, and the other with a cupola 
furnace, having a capacity of 1000 pounds per hour, a core 
oven, a brass furnace, moulding benches and special tools 

for use in a foundry. . • ' - ■ 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a 
Sturtevant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from a 
ten horse power engine, constructed by the students in the 

Mechanic Arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building 30 x 50 
feet, and is equipped with nine engine lathes, one speed 
lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one post drill, one 16-inch 
shaper, one 5lfoot planer, one universal milling machine, a 
corundum tool grinder and a small emery grinder. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches, vises and tools for twelve students. 

The tool room is well supplied with special tools for use 
in instruction, including a machine for grinding twist drills. 

A Weston dynamo is used at present for lighting the 
rooms when necessary. 




m*~ 



10 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



i 




in 



. — INMP 



BACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 



The chemical laboratory is supplied with new and modern 
apparatus, and in its entire equipment affords excellent 
facilities for instruction in practical chemistry. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this laboratory 
by scientific experts, in connection with the work of the ag- 
ricultural experiment station, are of especial value to ad- 
vanced students, and afford them unusual opportunities to 
learn the methods of scientific research. The building con- 
tains a large general laboratory that will accommodate sixty 
students, and lecture room with capacity for one hundred 
seats, and nine other rooms, all appropriated to instruction 
and research in chemistry. 

It is equipped with the improved modern appliances nec- 
essary for instruction and investigation. 

IV. — IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

The Electrical Labo^tory is well supplied with modern 
appliances for instruction in electrical engineering. It occu- 
pies two large rooms in the basement, and is equipped with 
a Weston 150 volt, 20 ampere dynamo ; one Brush 6 arc- 
light dynamo, with regulator ; one Edison compound wound 
12 kilo-watt generator ; a Crocker- Wheeler one-horse power 
motor and rheostat, and one alternator, made by special 
students. * 

The dynamos occupy a separate room from th* Labora- 
tory, and are operated by a 35-horse power Westinghouse 
vertical engine. 

The equipment comprises many fine instruments of pre- 
cision, Sir Wm. Thomson's standard 100 ampere balance, 
his graded current galvanometer, reading to 600 amperes ; 
also, his graded potential galvanometer, reading to 600 
volts, Cardew voltmeter, reading to 150 volts ; Weston's 
standard ammeter and voltmeter ; ballistic reflecting gal- 
vanometer, mirror galvanometer, Thomson Watt-meter, &c. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



11 



A battery of fifty-five Julien accumulators has also been in- 
stalled in the Laboratory. Ihere is also in connection with 
this department a 10-horse power motor at the experiment 
station farm a thousand yards from the College, which is 
run by the Edison generator at the Electrical Laboratory. 

y, — IN physics. 

In the College building provision is made for laboratory 
work in the department of physics. ► Hpecial rooms in the 
basement are appropriated for this purpose, and it is de- 
signed to equip this laboratory with the necessary appli- 
ances for instruction in practical physics. An improved 
testing machine, of 35,000 pounds capacity, has been pur- 
chased of Riehle Bros, for this laboratory. 



\ 



VI. — IN MINERALOGY. 



This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the base- 
ment, and is provided with tables and appliances to accom- 
modate thirty students, with an excellent collection of 
minerals. 

VII. — IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station, inves- 
tigations in botany are given special attention, and opportu- 
nities are offered advanced students for practical work in a 
laboratoryNespecially fitted with microscopes, tables, a dark 
room for photographic work, and appliances needed for in- 
struction and research. This department is provided with 
Auzoux's ciasti3 models of seeds and flowers for teaching 

botany. 

viii. — in BIOLOGY. 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture 
room of the professor, and is furnished with tables, micro- 
scopes and appliances for investigation. Each student of 
the class works under the supervision of the professor. 




f 



*■ 





12 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



IX. — IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 



The necessary apparatus for field work, including transits, 
levels, plane table, models of bridges, etc., is provided for 
the use of the students, and the customary exercises in the 
field are given. 

X. — IN DRAWING. 

All the students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as well 
as to train the eye and han$ to accuracy of observation and 
execution. A large, well-lighted drawing room, that will 
accommodate fifty students, is provided with tables, lock 
boxes, etc. 

MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity with 
the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of regular 
military drill, and in addition the military system is used as 
a means of enforcing discipline and securing good order, 
promptness and regularity in the performance of academic 
duties. 

This department is under the charge of Lieut. J H 
Wills, 22d Infantry, U. S. A. 

It has recently been supplied with new cadet muskets and 
accoutrements for the corps, and for artillery practice, with 
two three-inch rifle guns, carriages and limbers, k 



t < 



w 



Agricultural and Meclianical College. 
COLLEGE BUILDING. 



*? 



The frontispiece is a representation of the recently con- 
structed main college building. It is 160 by 71 feet, and 
contains, exclusive of the basement floor, thirty-five rooms. 
This building is not used for dormitories for students, but 
is appropriated for purposes of instruction and investiga- 
tion. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, 
laboratories, library, museum, armory, etc. The illustra- 
tions of the four floors on the following pages indicate the 
uses to which the rooms have been assigned. 

The rooms marked for the laboratories of physics and 
mechanics are used for electrical engineering and physics. 



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18 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 
As shown on the opposite page is a handsome two-story structure, 
40 by 60 feet, with a rear projection 35 by 60 feet of one story and 
basement. The exterior is of pressed brick, with cut stone trimmings, 
and terra-cotta ornamentation. 



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CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 



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Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



19 









































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Room 



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FIRST FLOOR 

The first room to the left is the office of the ^ffeng^ 
balance-room. On the right, extending the . whow ie g cut off from this, one 

laboratory and laboratory for ^f f^' j5 r ° 0S S c %e. Leading from the rear of the 
a balance-room, and the other for the .^fJ^i^oratory for general work. Two 
main hall is the door which enters ^lfJSf on aD fur naces an<f the other a private 
rooms are cut off from this-one for combustion mm 
working-room. 



20 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



a 



O 





T BtKl> . . Seoond Floor. 

Thll- ?T * re ttmple 8ccon[ >°»odationB foVassaving and storage 
The mam laboratory will accommodate sixty students and Icoriafe. 
improved working-tables, with water, gas and every necetsarvannH 
ance for chemical work m.), H «„ It.* „ " necessary apph- 
table with iwS. w n the waI1 °PP°»»e each working- 

table, with hoods, where necessary, connect with floes, and furnish the 
best possible means of escape for deleterious vapors, whUe veZlato™ 
in the ceiling furnish additional means for getting' rid o?noxS2«es! 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



21 



The height is sixteen feet in the clear, with paneled ceiling of oiled 
southern pine. The rooms are wainscotted throughout and finished in 

natural wood. 

The second story contains a lecture-room and room for gas analysis. 
Around this lecture room are cases for containing crude and manufac- 
tured products, illustrating the subjects of agricultural and industrial 
chemistry, which are prominent subjects taught in this institution. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, ninety by fifty feet. The second story 
is the audience hall, used for Commencement and other public occa- 
sions. 

The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of Mechanic Arts. 









GRADUATES IN 1891. 

♦ • 

CLASS OF 1891. 
HONOR GRADUATES. 

COURSE IN 0HEMI8TRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Beverly Franklin Harwood Perry 

C0UR8E IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 

Charles Cicero Johnson Coosa 

With Degree of Bachelor of Science. (B. So.) 

Lawrence Earnest Baker! Jeffergon . 

Harmon Benton ...Barbour. 

Frank Jams Bivins Lee 

Seaborn Jesse Buckalew Chambers. 

James Albert Cox t 

James Nathaniel Dean . \r \ 

Walter Edward Fitzgerald*. *. Moat gomery; 

William Thomas Gil. £ g 

Charles Bowls Glenn .... . .'.7.7.7 ". ' '. '. \\\[" j^^ 

Clifford Leroy Hare * T 

Beverly Franklin Harwood. . "p!!r 

Charles Cicero Johnson . " " * n 7 " 

John Calvin Kimball.....' p". 

Frank Allemong Lupton ? e ° rg,a ' 1 

William Andley Marshall a ■ 

Alexander Dowling McLennan 'ST*' 

William Henry Oates .... J**?"' 

Petit Refolds.. •••••••.••.....Mobile. 

William Edwards Reynolds m"" 

Robert Clanton Smfth. . . n*' 

Unambers. 



AgricuUwal and Mechanical College. 
With Degree of Master of Science. 

Daniel CHllis, B. Sc Georgia. 

John Hammond Little, B. Sc. . Lee. 

Andrew Manley Lloyd, B. Sc Lee. 

Robert Ernest Noble, B. Sc Calhoun. 

James Fielden Wilkinson. B. Sc Dale. 



23 



y 




r 







m\ 







DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 



AWARDED CERTIFICATES IN 1891. 



The students of each class who secure a grade above 90 in 
three or more subjects are distinguished for excellence 
in scholarship, and are awarded 

HONOI^ CERTIFICATES. 

The following students received honor certificates in 1891. 

Senior Class. r 

Harmon Benton .Barbour. 

Frank Jarvis Bivins Lee 

Seaborn Jesse Buckalew \\\ Chambers. 

Walter Edward Fitzgerald Georgia. 

Charles Bowls Glenn ^ e 

Clifford Leroy Hare t ' 

Beverly Franklin Harwood [[[[[ 7 . p er ry 

Charles Cicero Johnson " c 008 

John Calvin Kimball q 

William Audley Marshall. ////.V.'.'.V.'.'.'.V " "<wT 
Alexander Dowling McLennan Barbour 

Petit Reynolds " *, 

* Macon. 

HONOR STUDENTS IN JUNIOR GLASS. 

OOUB8E IN OHEMISTBY AND AGBICUXTUBE. 

Walter Evan Richards q. . 

COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 

Robert Jefferson Trammell t 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 25 

Junior Class. 

■R 

Elbert Cathey Averyt Shelby. 

Leigh Stafford Boyd Lee. 

Charles Allen Brown Sumter. 

Henry Ticknor DeBardeleben Jefferson. 

Henry Farris Dobbin Florida. 

William Francis Feagin Barbour. 

Raleigh Williams Green Lee. 

Raleigh Frederic Hare. -Lee. 

Louis Philip Hey man Georgia. 

Arthur Lyne Jones Autauga. 

Frank McLemore Mosely Montgomery. 

Walter Evan Richards Chambers. 

James L. Richey ^lhoun. 

George Adams Thomas Montgomery. 

Robert Jefferson Trammell • • • • Lee. 

Thomas Felton Wimberly Lee. 

Sophomore Class. 

Robert Lee Gordon Bivins Lee. 

Massey Robert Burton v • • Lee * 

X€ . ^ . Autauga. 

Mims Davis „_._ 

r , ^ Wilcox. 

Joel Dumas • . 

Hamilton Rowan Johnstone Mobile. 

Nicholas Barnett Marks • tT5 a 

Hampton Knox Miller • ■ • ' ' JJ^ 

Walter Merntt Kiggs 

Charles Henry Smith fcreorgia. 

Joel Franklin Webb ...booea. 

Fbbshman Class. 

« , a j . ..Tennessee. 

Champe Seabury Andrews .. ••••;; 

Howell Hunter Cherry . . C^fftWi • • • ;;• *f£ 

Ebenezer Westley Doughty . . ? :• i ..-••• v ^ * 

Joseph Addison Driver '.Montgomery. 

Julius Confree Dunham 



"JS-" 1 !" "■ ■ 



»' 











I 



26 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Thomas McElrath Coosa. 

Edwin McKay Barbonr. 

Paul Pratt McKeown Florida. 

Peyton Herndon Moore Blount. 

William Washington Moore. Blount, 




<\ 




o 





— "^*p 



"A y 



\ 



) * 

CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 

r^ — ^ — 

V r- FOR THE SESSION 1891-92. 

' •. , *■ « 1 

V 

\X GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

[Residence is Alabama when State is not named.] 

NAME. EESIDENCE. 

Lawrence Earnest Baker Jefferson. 

Harmon Benton Barbour - 

Seaborn Jesse Bnckalew • • • Chambers. 

Wilmer Calloway. Montgomery. 

Benjamin Minge Duggar.... Hale. 

Charles Bowls Gleniw Lee - 

Clifford Leroy Hare.— Jfe. 

Charles Cicero Johnson >~~ Coo6a - 

Frank Allemong Luptdn—n J* 8 - 

William Audley Marshall J ^ 

Alexander Dowling McLennan Barbour. 

Seniob Class. 

William Sayre Allen * Montgomery. 

Archie Scruggs Averett • *°*®*' 

Elbert Cathey Averyt Shelby. 

Leigh Stafford BoycU— ee * ■ 

i-.i_ i ah t> " Sumter. 

Charles Allen Brown. 

Jacob Thompson Bullen m *? ™*!' 

n o v t nl lr Montgomery. 

George Samuel Clark..; * ™« w 

Walter Bartow Clay Montgomery. 

vv alter tfartow oiay ... Montgomery. 

John Gereardt Crommelm E 11 k 

Jesse Locke Culver • tanea 

George William Dantzler * u a J B " 

tt t t^ .j L> Montgomery.N 

Henry Lee Davidson.-/ - : 



r 




> 



ft 



I 



28 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Her-v. Ticknor DeBardeleben ( Jefferson. 

Henry Farris Dobbin . . Florida. 

"" Willial". Francis Feagin .^/. . *. Barbour. 

James Edward Gachet .Lee. 

Eugene Hamiter Graves Barbour. 

Raleigh Williams Greene .f/ Lee. 

- Raleigh Frederick Hare_ Lee. 

- Louis Philip Heyman . , Georgia. 

Arthur Lyne Jones. . / Autauga. 

Robert Dibrell McAllister Georgia. 

Frank McLemore Mosely^/. Montgomery^ 

Louis Sinclair Munford. Virginia. 

* Leonidas Warren Payne ._ Le e . 

Charles Teed Pollard Montgomery. v 

- Walter Evan Richards/. Chambers. 

Edward Broadus Smith Lee. s 

Signoi Sidney Strong . i Georgia. 

George Adams Thomas/. . (. Montgomery.. 

Sheldon Lynn Tooraer ^^, Lee. 

Robert Jefferson Traramell /, Le e . 

David Marshall Walker Marengo. 

David Lewis Whetstone Elmore. 

Clan ton Ware Williams Montgomery ( 

David Edwin Wilson.^. .1'. Jefferson. 

Junior Glass. 

Lee Ashcraft. #, Lauderdale. 

Wallace Reverdy Bishop .-^ Talladega. 

Robert Lee Gordon Bivins.v*. . Lee. I 

Francis Marshall Boy kin. . Montgomery. 

Massey Robert Burton Le e 

Clifford Fontaine Clopton Montgomery. 

Walter Scott CrumpJ^ St . C lair. 

Union Anderson Culbreath L 6 e. ' 

Clarence William Daugette Le«. , 

Joel Dumas ' fa^ 

John Harris Dunstan So . Carolina. 



**7 



Agricultural aad Mechanical College. 29 

Daniel Benjamin Edwards, Jr Dallas. 

Thomas Gardner Foster, Jr Montg< 7 \y. 

John Henry Holt ._^. ., Georgia** 

Byron Watts Jones.-rr Lee. \ 

& Thomas Litchfield Kennedy, Jr Lee. ' 

James Monroe Little ^ Lee. | 

James Berry Loveless Marshall. 

' Nicholas Barnett Marks. ^^ Kentucky. 

James David Martin Colbert. 

Edward Baker Mell Georgia. 

Hampton Knox Miller Talladega. 

\ Walter Merritt Riggs So. Carolina. 

John Shelton Robinson '. Jefferson. 

Guy Allen Shafer . Perry. 

Charles Henry Smith Georgia. 

John Howard Smith Georgia. 

Henry Hamilton Smith Montgomery. 

Linton Sparks Smith Georgia. 

Roeser Colbert Spratlingi^.^. Chambers. 

Joel Franklin Webb.-r^ . .-A/. .Coosa. 

Sophomore Class. 

George Smith Anderson ^-^ . . Lee> 

Champe Seabury Andrews Tennessee. 

Harvey Armstrong * Missouri. 

Henry Harrington Bookhart. Georgia. 

John Morgan Burns Dallas. 

George Washington La Fayette Carr Lowndes. 

Howell Hunter Cherry I jee - 

William DeLamar Clayton ^. ^ I^e. V 

Robert Park Clower. , • Lee - v 

Roseberry Covington Connor Macon. 

Robert David Conner • • • .Macon. 

Palmer Payne Dangette ^ ee \ 

Charles Fairchild DeBardeleben Jefferson. 

Joseph Addison Driver Pen 7- # 

Rufus Thomas Dorsey . . r. ^> Georgia, 



> 



I 












J 

MB 

30 Agricultural and Mechanic OoUff 

,. ....Georgia. 

Ebenezer Westley Doughty • • • Hale 

Wifjrley Goode Dnggar .Montgomery. 

J nlius Conf ree Dunham ........ Madison. 

-f Charles Dnnlap ....... .Madison. 

James Dunlap ' Lee. ^ 

j John Thomas Eckford Calhoun. 

Ogden EUery Edwards .'. '.'.'.'. .Lee. A 

Thomas Flanagan r^r ' " g ar bour. 

Robert Cherry Foy Jefferson. 

Frederic Almet Fnlghum. */ .Jefferson. 

Richard Billnps Going ' Barbour. 

James Perry Grant .Lee. N 

Charles Gordou Greene ' ^ ^ 

Crosland Clarence Hare <« Georgia. 

* Thomas Gordon Herrell .Morgan. 

Augustus J. Harris. Elmore 5 . 

Arnold Whitfield Herren ••••'• ' Calhoun . 

Thomas Carter Hill .Georgia. 

**/ Robert Ford Hunter Autauga. 

J acob Samuel Johnson • "' Georg i a . 

Remer Young Jones.... '....Lee. \ 

Welborn T. Jones .^— .Tuscaloosa. 

Sidney Leach ... .. Barbour. 

John D. Martin Chambers. 

Orrin Joseph McCarley ' ' • CooM 

f- Thomas McElrath Florida. 

Paul Pratt McKeown • * ' ' * ' Georgia . 

a. George Young McRee "'"... .Florida. 

Herman Meislahn • .Georgia. 

Ernest Knoles Miller Georgia. 

J Edward Beall Mitchell ^ ^ 

J. Lauriston Greene Moore .^ Blount 

Peyton Herndon Moore • • • Blonnt 

William Washington Moore _ ^ 

Charles Carter Newman^- Tennessee. 

Thomas Verner Ordway .; r ^. Q ia 

Joseph Priestly Orme. . .r. .p 



1 



r> 









I 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 31 

Hamilton Ormsby Kentucky. 

Peter Preer. .~r? Georgia. 

Joseph Bea8ly Rud ulph. rrr. Lowndes. 

Thomas Henry Schuessler Chambers. 

Albert Somerville Tuskaloosa. 

James Edward Stanley Georgia. 

James Nelson Stephens Barbour. 

Robert Otis Stone Mobile. 

William Simeon Street Tallapoosa. 

Frederick Lloyd Tate Russell. 

Henry Curry Turner Madison. 

Thomas Luther Thomason Randolph. 

Jack Thorington Montgomery. 

William Douglass Trawick Lee. 

Frank Atkinson Vernon . . . , * . . . Chambers. 

Andrew^ Hearne Whitman a ^ : Lee.\ 

Rinaldo Greene Williams. . . .Lee. v 

William Dunbar Wills Lee.* 

Arthur Zachariah Wright**- j, Lee. 

ary Oscar Wright . _ +». ?2+.Ci Lee. 



FRE8HMAN CLA88. 



f Daniel Spigner Anderson 

7 Walter Scott Askew 

1 Frank Stuart Barnes 

\ David French Boyd.^*-. 
| Frank Asbury Boy kin «**. 
\ James Hardy Bradford. 

Henry Clay Burr 

Solon Lyciirgus Coleman 

obert Mullins Collins 

iley Davis Crenshaw 

ames Marquis DeLacy 

ir Hugh DeLacy 

Clarence Eugene DuBose. . . 
I Robert Eugene Dumas. . . ♦• 
Leonidas Dunaway. .r*~ /7t . 




\ 



.Lee. 

Chambers. 
Jefferson. 
Lee. 
Lee. 
Lee. 

Georgia. 
Perry. 
Missouri. 
Tallapoosa. 
Russell. 
Russell. 
Lee. 
Wilcox. 
, Wilcox. 







. 



32 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

7 Henry Drayton Evins.^. Florida. 

Morrie Louis Falk Marengo. 

Charles Grigeby Foulks Dale. 

Benjamin Browning Haralson .-^- Dallas. 

i Sumter Lea Harwood Perry. 

John Fletcher Heard . ^m Lee. 

John Thomas Hill Eandolph. 

William Hardy Hill. Eandolph. 

/ Claud Holstnn.-_ ..Lee. ^ 

Smith Graham Howard Dallas. 

Thomas Arnold Hurt Macon. 

*4William Coats Hurt Macon. 

•4 Frederick Ingate. Mobile. 

** George Oliver Janney Montgomery. 

-4 Paul Adolphns Lewis Sumter. 

Steven Edmund Martin . . . .Lowndes. 

i Cary Park McElhaney Lee. ' 

William Cunningham McMillan Talladega. 

John Robert McNab Barbour. ' 

7 Andrew Hamilton Milstead Elmore. 

William Page Molette .^ Dallas. 

William Flournoy Moore Butler. 

George Haden Oglesby Texas. 

Thomas Winfrey Oliver Montgomery. 

Henry Hinds Peevey Madison. 

Tilden Hendricks Phipps. Georgia. 

Thomas Jefferson Poole Georgia. 

Charles Llewellyn Pinkston Chilton. 

Benjamin Fitzpatrick Russell Tallapoosa. 

Walter Russell Shafer Perry. 

-jr Percy Hilton Smith Georgia, 

Robert Mailard Stephens .Barbour. 

Tyler McCuin Swann Randolph. 

Felix Stanley Thomas Lee. 

/ Hugh Pearson Thornton Jefferson. 

y. Harvey Casie Tuttle Macon. 

Robert Edward Lee Weathers . ? . ?& Randolph. 



) 

I 

J 



Agricultural and Mechanical Cvllege. 38 

Robert Patton Weeden Lauderdale. 

John Adams Wills... Lee- 

James Alexander Wilson ; Franklin. 

Frank Lewis Whitman -.r^. Lee. 

Eugene Glover Wing , Clark. 

John Meadows Wolfenden Florida. 

Sub-Frbshman Class. 

Percy Alexander Bryant • Baldwin. 

James Washington Culver Lee- 
Walter Earnest Culver ^ee. 

James Artemus Culver - - • ^g 1 ^ 

Walter MicaphEckford.^ --^ 

Emil Ernest Erhart L 

Charles Warner Etheredge ........ ^orgia. 

Jacob Herman Feist '.'.'.'..Lowndes. 

Samuel Ananias Gordon 

James Amos Griffin^— ^J^ 

Mitchell Jackson Howard . . . . • Georgia. 

John Asa Hudson Lee. 

Frank Ernest Jackson e ' 

John Alexander Jackson ^^ 

James Jacob Lampley Randolph. 

Oscar William Longshore • • • • • ••.•••■• ' picken8> 

John Summerville Long Lee 

Benjamin Bufford McGehee- ...••• .Florida. 

James Waller Means. • " ' p alla8 . 

Edwin Alien Oliver... •••••• ...pike. 

4- George Emmet Pace .:: ... .Coosa. 

Henry Wilson Pond * * ' * Wa8 hington. 

Charles Lynn Pringle .Florida. 

Edwin Lightfoot Reese .••••'■■ pi or ida. 

John Milton Shettleworth »•••'• | Barbonr . 

Asa Eugene Tatom ' '■'■'■' .pi or ida. 

Seldon Edgar Thomas '.'.'...Barbour. 

Leroy Jack Upshaw, .;••••• L, 

3 



i 




»-▼ 



7 



t 

4 



84 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Charles Wilson Franklin. 

Frederick Henry Winston ..-£._/ Lee. 

Special Students. 

Thomas Jackson Boyd Lee. 

Henry Crommelin Montgomery. 

Aaron Thomas Colley . . Pike. 

Walter Caldwell Darwin Madison. 

Herbert Armstead Goldthwaite.. . . .Montgomery. 

Alfred Flournoy Griggs .Georgia. 

Francis Gustavus Hendrick pike. 

^Mims Lamar Howard Autauga. 

John Robert Hinson Lowndes. 

Clifton Arthur Jones Lee. 

Henry Clay Jones [[[[ .Montgomery. 

^ George Augustus KIie_ Marengo. 

<Q Frank Inman_JfcBee . . .Georgia; 

George Simonton Means Florida. 

Joseph Samuel Pou.-rr .Lee. 

Graham Golson Vanghan Dallas. 

James Monroe Watkins . pjk e# 

Summary. 

Graduates .. * 

Senior Class. . .. . o/* 

Junior Class.. ■ „« 

Sophomore Class ^o 

Freshman Class ' * ft 

Special Students 17 

Total in College Classes , ..... , . 2 25 

Sub-Freshman Class. . . f . on 

Total. ^.?. .7?: "^ 




J^ * S?7; ^5j 






^^-m 



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i\j* i S v 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 



35 



English 

History 

French 

German 

Latin 

Mental Science 

Political Economy.., 

Mathematics 

Chemistry ' 

Analytical Chemistry 

Biology 



225 

137 

26 

11 

72 

15 

33 

212 

123 

56 

12 



Agriculture 117 

Physics 108 

Botany ^ 

Geology 39 

Civil Engineering 35 

Electrical Engineering.. 13 

Drawing 193 

Mechanic Arts. 152 

Military Tactics 241 

Photography I 5 




/ 






'lO\ 




V. 



Military Organization. 



1891-92.^ 



■■ 



President, 

W. L. BROUN. 

Commandant, 

JOHN H. WILLS, 1st Lt. 22d Infantry. 

Major, 

L. E. BAKER. 

Surgeon, 
JV H. DRAKE. 

Battalion Staff, 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant G. A. THOMAS, Adjutant. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant D. L. WHETSTONE, Quartermaster. 
Cadet Sergeant JOEL DUMAS, Sergeant Major. 
Cadet Sergeant J. H. HOLT, Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Cadet Captains. 

3. H. F. Dobbin, 

4. W. F. Feagin. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenants. 

5. J. G. Crommelin,, 

6. H. T. DeBardeleben, 

7. R. W. Greene, 

8. R. J. Trammell. 
Cadet 2d Lieutenants. 

3. F. M. Mosely. 

4. 0. T. Pollard. 
Cadet 1st Sergeants. 

3. R. 0. Spratlinq, 

4. E. B. Mkll. 



1. C. A. Brown, 

2. J. E. Gachet, 

1. J. T. Bullen. 

2. A. L. Jones, 

3. W. B. Clay, 

4. H. L. Davidson, 

1. t. H. Graves, 

2. D. E. Wilson, 

1. 0. H. Smith, 

2. W. 8. Crump, 



^^ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



37 



1. W. R. Bishop, 

2. L. S. Smith, 

3. J. H. DUNSTAN, 

4. R. E. L. Bivins, 

5. W. M. Riggs, _ Q 

6. H. K. Miller, 



Cadet Sergeants* 

8, M. R. Burton, & 

9. J. F. Webb, 

10. F. M. Boykin, 

11. J. M. Little, 

12. G. A. Shaper, 

13. 0. W. Daugette, 

5» 



i 



7. T. G. Foster, Color Sergeant, 14. T. L. Kennedy, Jr. 

15. H. H. Smith. 
Cadet Corporals. 



h P. P. McKeown, 

2. 0. S. Andrews, 

3. J. S. Johnson, I 

4. R. T. Dorsey* Jr.,* \ ^ 

5. Jack Thorington, 

6. Charles Dunlap,* 

7. A. W. Herren, 



iv *^ 



8. R. C. Foy, 

9. F. A. Fulgham, 3 K 

10. J. C. Dunham* 

11. W. W. Moore, 

12. G. S. Anderson, 

13. R. P. Clower, 
14. , C. G. Greene,* 



15. R. C. Conner. 

* 

Note.— *Denotes Color Corporal. 



r 



1 



38 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



Applicants for admission must be of good moral charac- 
ter. To enter the fourth class the applicant must be not 
less than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified to pass 
a satisfactory examination on the following subjects : 

1. Geography and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) An examination upon sentences con- 
taining incorrect English, (b) A composition giving evi- 
dence of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, 
grammar and division into paragraphs. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, including fundamental 
operations ; common and decimal fractions ; denominate 
numbers, the metric system ; percentage, including interest 
and discount ; proportion ; extraction of square and cube 
roots, (b) Algebra, to quadratic equations. 

Those applicants who desire to continue the study of 
Latin should be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination 
in Latin grammar and the first two books of Caesar, in ad- 
dition to the above subjects. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should be 
prepared to stand a satisfactory examination on all the 
studies of the lower classes, as shown in the courses of 
study. Where opportunity has not been offered to pursue 
special studies required at this College, the system of 
equivalents will be adopted, and studies which denote an 
equivalent amount of discipline and training will be ac- 
cepted as satisfactory. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday the 
14th of September, the day on which the sessions opens. 
Candidates will also be examined during the session, when 
application is made for admission. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



39 



Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 
examinations for full admission to the Freshman class are 
admitted to the sub-college department. 

They will be advanced to full admission to the Freshman 
class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily the re- 
quired examinations. 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report immediately to the 
President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any class 
previous to matriculation. 

NUMBEE OF EXEEOISES EEQDIEED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen 
recitations per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the 
exercises in laboratory work, drawing and military drill. 
These additional exercises occupy not less than twelve hours 
per week and in all give twenty-seven exercises per week 
required. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Students who are qualified to prosecute the studies of the 
junior class, and those over twenty-one years of age who are 
not candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, with the 
advice of the Faculty, the subjects of study they may prefer 
and for which they may be qualified , all other studente 
will be assigned to one of the regular prescribed courses of 
study, unless otherwise ordered by the Faculty 

Eegular students who fail to pass satisfa ct oryfi nal ex 
amotions in any one study become special stude^s. They 
will be classed as regular students V°^*™T%£ 
degree, whenever they can pass the examinations m those 
subjects in which they were found deficient. 

Students candidates for a degree, who are not in lull 

the Catalogue. 



60 



|j»jr f~* y**> !*"* 



fi C 



i * 





40 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
COUESES OF INSTRUCTION. 



•** 



The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and 
Natural Sciences, with their applications ; Agriculture, 
Biology, Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Engineering, 
Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Drawing, English, French, 
German and Latin Languages, History, Political Economy, 
Mental and Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to 
offer a liberal and practical education as a preparation for 
the active pursuits of life. 

There are three degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and 
requiring four years for its completion : 

I, Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 
II. Course in Mechanics and Engineering. 
III. General Course. 

There are also two partial courses, each requiring two 
years for its completion : 

IV. Two Years' Course in Agriculture. 
V. Two Years' Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I includes theoretical and practical instruction uj 
those branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and 
is especially adapted to those who propose to devote them- 
selves to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II includes the principles and applications of the 
sciences that directly relate to civil, electrical and mechani- 
cal engineering, and is adapted to those who expect to 6nter 
the profession of engineering. 

Courses III has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language to 
meet the wants of those students who have selected no 
definite vocation in life, as well as of those who propose 
ultimately to engage in teaching, or in some commercial or 
manufacturing business, 




* 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



41 



Courses IV and V have been arranged for the benefit of 
those students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, 
are unable to continue at college four years and take one of 
the regular degree courses. 

Students who complete either of these two year courses 
will, on passing a satisfactory examination, receive certifi- 
cates indicating their attainments. 

Those who have completed the general course in each 
department of the school of Mechanic Arts, and are quali- 
fied, can enter upon a more extended technical course in 
Mechanical Engineering. 

PREPARATORY COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

Students who expect to become practical pharmacists can 
enter upon a special course of Chemistry and Natural His- 
tory and occupy all their time in the laboratories of these 
departments, under the immediate direction of the pro- 
fessors. With the excellent facilities offered in the chemical 
and botanical laboratories, scientific preparation of great 
value to the practical pharmacist can be obtained. 

COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

Students who ha& received the degree of B. So. in Engi- 
neering, or who have prosecuted an equivalent course of 
study, can enter upon a special course of Mining Engineer- 
ing, which includes the following subjects of study, and will 
require a residence of one year : 

Industrial Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of Ores, 
Mineralogy, Economic Geology, Mining Machinery, Drift- 
ing, Tunnelling, Timbering, Ore Dressing, and the various 
operations connected with the exploitation of mines 

This course of study will be under the charge of the Pro- 
fessors of Chemistry, Engineering and Natural History. 



, 



42 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

SPECIAL ONE 'YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study Agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class un- 
der the Professor of Agriculture, and will be excused from reciting in 
any other class, from military duty, and from all other college duties; 
but will be under the general college regulations, and will be required 
to have their time fully occupied. 

They can attend the lectures in Agriculture in all the classes and 
engage in the practical work at the experimental station, in the field 
stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard and vineyard, etc., and may thus, 
in one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of Scientific Agri- 
culture. 

LABOKATOBY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature in 
the courses of education provided for the students of this 
College, and as far as possible all students are required to 
enter upon laboratory work in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given in 
the following departments : 

I. — Chemistry. 

II.— Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, etc. 
III. — Agriculture. 
IV. — Botany. 
V. — Mineralogy. 
VI.— Biology. 
VII. — Technical Drawing. 
VIII. — Mechanic Arts. 
IX. — Physics. 
X. — Electrical Engineering. 










Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



43 



I._COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 
Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics 
3. Drawing. 



6. Mechanic Art Labor'y.6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 



3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 

1 M7chanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture, 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic .\rt Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

2. English. 

3. Botany (a) 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

3. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 



3. English. 
3. Physics. 



3. English. 
3. Physics. 



3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. Industrial Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture 

4. Botany. (Lab'y.) 4. Botany, (Laby.) 

1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 

9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. Chemical Laboratory. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture. 

3. Military D rill. 3. Military Drill, 
(a) Begins March 1st 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 

4. Botany. (Lab'y.) 

1. Military Tactics. 

9. Chemical Laboratory 

2. Practical Agriculture. 
2. Military Drill. 



44 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



First Term. 

2. English Literature. 2. 

2. Mental Science. 2 

2. Physics. 2. 

2. Geology. 2. 

2. Biology. 2. 
2. Agricultural Chemistry2. 

1. Military Science. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 



8ENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

Political Economy. 2. 
Mental Science. 2. 

Astronomy. 2. 

Geology. 2. 

Biology. 2. 

Agricultural Chemistry2. 
Military Science. I. 

Chemical Laboratory. 2. 
Practical Agriculture. 2. 



Third Term. 

Political Economy. 
Mental Science. 
Astronomy. 
Geology. 
Biology. 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Military Science. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Practical Agriculture. 



II.— COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 



First Te»m. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History, 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture (b) 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

5. English, 
2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 



(a) Or History continued. 

(b) For Agriculture may 
Laboratory, 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. El. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. Third Term. 

3. English. 2. English. 

2. History. 3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 
3. Agriculture (b). 3. Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing. 3 Drawing. 

6 Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



Botany begins March 1st. 
be substituted French or German or work in the Chemical 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



45 



First Term. 

3. English, French or 3 
German. 

3. Physics. 
5, Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 

4. Lab'y, Mineralogy (a). 4. 
4. Field Work, Engin'g. 4. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 



Third Term. 



English, French or 3. Engi<h, French or 



3. 
5. 
5. 
5. 
1. 



German. 
Physics. 
Mathematics. 
Engineering. 
Drawing. 
Military Tactics. 



German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 



1. Military Tactics. 
Lab'y, Mineralogy (a) 6. Field Wrk, Engin'g (a) 
Field Work, Engin'g. 3. Military Drill. 
Military Drill. 



First Term, 



SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 



2. English Literature (b). 5. Political Economy (b).2. 



2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Science. 



2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Science. 



2. 
2. 
4. 
5. 
5. 
1. 



Third Term. 

Political Economy (b). 

Astronomy. 

Geology. 

Mathematics. 

Engineering. 

Drawing. 

Military Science. 

Field Work, Engineer'g 



Field Work, Engineer'g Field Work, Engineer'g 

IIL^-GENERAL COURSE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week.. 



First Tirm. 

:'.. English. 

2. History. 
5 Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 
2. History. 
5. Latin. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

3. Latin. 

6. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 



o. urw 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 2. Agncultur^ , 

o ™-iu r* n * Military Drill. 6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military una. ^ ^.^ ^.^ 



S £^!£v*.W~*»» substitute. Fren^aroennan. 



46 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



First Term. 

5. Latin. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 
Second Term. 

5. Latin. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 



Third Term. 

5. Latin. 

3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

3. Drawing. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y, 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. Latin. , 

3. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (b). 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. Latin. 

3. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 

2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
English Thesis. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. Latin. 

3. German. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Laboratory Work (b). 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. , 
English Thesis. 



(a) Or History continued. 

(b) The student may elect 



Botany begins March 1st. 
the Laboratory o Jany department for which ha may be qualified; 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 47 

IV.— TWO YEARS' COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

,5. Mathematics. 

3. Physics. 

3. Drawing. 
12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 

6. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



TJiird Term. 

2. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



V.— TWO TEARS' COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

FIRST YEAR. 
First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 



5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. ' 2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 6. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3 Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agriculture, 



First Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

5. Agriculture. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 



Third Term. 

2. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
5. Agriculture. 



5. Agriculture. 
12. Practical Agriculture. 12. Practical Agriculture.12. Practical Agriculture 
3. Military Drill. 3, Military Prill. 3. Military Drill, 



SCHEDULE OF EXEECISES. 



oo 



HOURS. 


MONDAY. 


TUESDAY. 


WEDNESDAY. 


THURSDAY. 


FRIDAY. 


SATURDAY. 


I. 


4. Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 


4. Algebra. 


4. 


Geometry. 


4. Algebra. 






3. Latin 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin 


3. 


Latin 


3. Latin. 




on 


2. French. 


2. German. 


2. French. 


2. 


German. 


2. French . 


Exerc's in Elocution 




1 and 2 Drawing . 


1 and 2 D awing. 


i and 2 Drawing. 


L 


and 2 Drawing. 


L and 2 Drawing. 








2. Botany . 


2. Practical Agri. 


2. 


Botany 


i. Practical Agri. 






4. Mechanic Arts 


1. Mental Science. 


4. Mech. Arts. 


1. 


Mental Science. 


4. Mechanic Arts. 
1. Biologv. 






4. English. 


4. History. 


4. English. > 


1. 


History. 


4. English. 




n. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. 


Agriculture. 


3. Chemistry. 


Military Drill. 




2. Engineering. 


2. Engineering. 


2. Engineering. 


2 


Engineering. 


2. Engineering. 




9-10 


2. Latin. 


2. Botany. 


2. Latin. 


2. 


Botany . 


L. Biology. 






1. Calculus. 


1. Physics. 


1. Calculus. 


1. 


Physics. 


l.-Oalculus. 






1. French. 




1. French. 






1. French. 






4. Mech. Arts. 




4. Mech. Arts 
2. Practical Agri 






2. Latin. 

4. Mech. Arts. 
















2. Practical Agri. 






MONDAY. 


TUESDAY 


-WEDNESDAY. 


THURSDAY. 


FRIDAY. 


SATURDAY. 




3. English. 


• 










2. German. 


m. 


2. Physics. 


3 History (1 2). 


3. English. 


3. 


History (t. 2). 


3. English. 


4. Mech. Arts, 1 Sec. 




1. German. 


3. Botany v 2. 3). 


2. Physics. 


3. 


Botany (2. 3) . 


2. Physics. 


3. Mech. Arts, 2 Sec. 


lo-ii 


U Engineering 




1. German. 






1. German. 


1. 2. Machine Work. 




I. Biology 


1. Engineering. 


1. Engineering. 


1. 


Engineering. 


1. Engineering. 


Laboratory Work 


- 


3. Botany (2. 3). 


4. English 


1. Biology 


4 


English 


1 


Field Work, Eng'ng. 



















1. 



a 



S. 






J 



■■Mi 





4. Physics (1. 2). 


4. Mech.Arts 1 Sec 


4. 


Physics (1. 2). 


4. Mechanic Arts 
I Sec. 


4. Physics (1. 2). 




IV. 


4. Agriculture (3). 




4. 


Latin. 




4. Agriculture (3). 






4. Latin (1. 2). 


4. Latin. 


3. 


Agriculture. 


4. Latin. 


4. Latin (1. 2). 




11-12 


3 Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 


•> 


Mathematics. 


2. Agriculture. 


3. Drawing. 


4. Mech. Arts 1 Sec. 




2. Mathematics. 


2. Agriculture. 


2. 


Chemistry. 


2. Mathematics. 


2. Mathematics, 


3. Mech. Arts 2 Sec. 




2. Chemistry. 


2. Mathematics. 


L. 


English (1). 


L. Chemistry. 


2. Chemistry. 


1 & 2. Machine Work 




1. English (1). 


1. Chemistry. 


L. 


Political Econ- 






Field Work, Eng'ng. 




1. Polit.Econ. (2.3) 






omy (2. 3). 




1. Military Science 


Laboratory Work. 












4. Mechanic Arts 






V. 


4.*Drawing. 


4. Mech. Arts 1 Sec 


4. 


Drawing. 


[1 Sec. 


I. Drawing. 






3. Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. 


Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 


Mechanic Arts. 


12-1 


2. English. 


2. English. 
1. Geology. 


1. 


Latin. 


1. English. 
1. Geology. 


1. Latin. 


Laboratory Work. 


P. M. 


MONDAY. 


TUESDAY. v 


WEDNESDAY. 


THURSDAY. 


FRIDAY. 


SATURDAY. 






\ 








4. Mech. Arts. 






4. Mech.Arts 2 Sec 


3. Mech. Arts 


4. 


Mech. Arts 2 Sec 


3. Mech. Arts 


2 Sec. 




VI VII 


3. Mech.Arts 1 Sec 


2d & 3d Sec. 


3. 


Mech. Arts 1 Sec 


2d and 3d Sec. 


3. Mech. Arts 






3. Field Work Agr. 


2. Mineralogy 


3. 


Field Work Agr 


2. Mineralogy 


1 Sec. 




2-4 


1 & 2 Laboratory . 


Laboratory. 


1 & 2 Laboratory 


Laboratory. 


3 Field Work Agr. 






1 & 2 Field Work 


2. Mech. Artb. 




Chem. 


1. 2. Mech. Arts. 


1&2. LaVrvChem 






Eng'ng. 


Military Drill (*) 


I & 2 Field Work 




I & 2. Field Work 












Eng'ng 


Military Drill, (*) 


Eng'ng 








* 


E 


xer's in Elocut'n 


Exer's in Elocut'n 














Chapel services daily at 7:50 A. M. 

Numbers prefixed denote classes, — 1 denotes Senior, 2 Junior, &c. 

•From 4:30 to 5:30 P. M. 



Numbers affixed — (1), (2), (3). denote terms. 









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 






PRESIDENT BROUN. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text-books 
and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The first part of 
the course is occupied with Elementary Rational Mechanics, 
treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of Molecular Me- 
chanics ; while due prominence is given to principles, fre- 
quent reference is made to the applications of science. 

The studies of the junior class include the properties of 
matter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kinematics, 
kinetics, mechanic powers, friction, pendulum, molecular 
forces of solids, liquids and gases, theory of undulations, 
heat, electricity, magnetism, etc. 

The studies of the senior class include Optics, Astronomy 
and Meteorology. 

Text-Books. —In Physics, Atkinson's Ganot. In Astronomy, Young. 

MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. SMITH. " f.y 

The general course for the first two years embraces the 
first year, Algebra and Geometry, six books ; second year, 
Solid Geometry, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Survey- 
ing, Mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained : First mental dis- 
cipline ; second, a thorough knowledge of the principles of 
pure mathematics and their practical applications. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



51 



Theoretical and practical instruction is given to the 
sophomore class in farm, town, and government land survey- 
ing, dividing land, mapping, plotting, and computing of 
areas etc. ; also in the theory, adjustment and use of instru- 
ments. 

The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to field 

practice. 

Mensuration includes an extended course iu measurements 
of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and curvilinear 
figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, 
lays the foundation for the pure and applied Mathematics of 
the Mechanical and Engineering courses. Analytical Geome- 
try, Descriptive Geometry, and Calculus are pursued in 
the Mechanical and Engineering courses. Especial atten- 
tion is given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is sup- 
plemented by lectures. Solutions of original practical prob- 
lems are required of the student, to make him familiar with 
the application of principles and formulae. 

Text-Books. 

Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry Wentworfh'. . Trigo, 
nometry and Surveying, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, Waldo a 
Descriptive Geometry, Taylor ' s Calculus. 

NATURAL HISTOEY AND GEOLOGY. 

PEOF. MELL. 

Geology.-This subject is studied in the senior class, and 
extends through the entire session. Specia attention is 
given to the geology of Alabama, and many illustrations are 
drawn from the coal and iron fields and other natural de- 
posits of minerals in the State. The origin of ore deposits, 
mineral springs and geological relations of soils are care- 
fully studied. 



t 



52 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



There is also a course of advanced work in practical 
Geology for the post-graduate students. This subject is 
pursued by applicants for degrees of Master of Science and 
Mining Engineering. 

The junior class in Engineering spends two terms in 
Mineralogy and blow-pipe work. 

Botany. — The students of the Sophomore class begin the 
study of Botany the first of March and continue it through 
the session. Analytical work is made an important feature. 
This class is provided with plants from the fields, and 
taught how to determine their specific names. The work is 
sufficiently exhaustive to enable the student, after comple- 
ting the course, to name any of the ordinary weeds and 
grasses that he will encounter in this section. 

In the junior class, in the course of Chemistry and Agri- 
culture, an 'amount of time is devoted to systematic and 
structural Botany, and to advanced laboratory work with the 
microscope in the preparation of specimens showing plant 
structure ; this work is sufficient to familiarize the students 
with the methods of plant building and cellular organiza- 
tion. Excellent microscopes of the most improved patterns, 
and all the necessary chemicals and apparatus for preparing 
and mounting vegetable tissues, are used by the students. 
A dark room is attached to this laboratory for photo- 
micrography. 

Text-Books. 

LeOonte's Geology, Gray's Botany, Dana's Mineralogy, Goodale's 
Physiological Botany, Nelson's Herbarium and Plant Descriptions. 

ALABAMA WEATHER SERVICE. 

The United States Signal Service has established in Ala- 
bama a State system for collecting meteorological data rela- 
ting to climatic changes. The service is now in successful 
operation with the central office located at this Institute. 
Bulletins are issued at the close of each month, compiled 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



53 



from reports sent from numerous stations throughout the 
State. An opportunity is thus offered the students in 
Meteorology of becoming familiar with the system operated 
by the Department at Washington. 

CIVIL ENGINEEBING AND DRAWING. 

PROF. LANE. 
CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies of this department begin in the Junior 
class, and require a good knowledge of Algebra, Geometry, 
Trigonometry and Analytical Mechanics. They are as fol- 
lows : \ 

Junior Class. — Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic 
curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting 
slope stakes, location and construction of common roads and 

railroads. 

Senior Class, — Classification, appearances, defects, sea- 
soning, durability and preservation of timber ; classification 
and description of natural building stones ; bricks and con- 
cretes ; cast and wrought iron, steel and other metals ; 
limes, cements, mortars and their manufacture ; paints and 
other preservatives ; classification of strains and a general 
mathematical discussion of the same ; joints and fastenings ; 
solid and open built beams ; classification, construction aud 
mechanics of masonry ; foundations on land and in water ; 
bridges and roofs of different kinds; their construction and 
strains determined mathematically and graphically ; common 
roads, their coverings, location and construction; location 
and construction of railroads; navigable, ifrigatipn, and 
drainage canals ; river and sea-coast improvements. Theory 
and practice are combined in both classes. 

Text-Books. 

Junior Class.-Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers, Gilles- 
pie's Roads and Railroads, Parson's Track. 
Senior Class.-Wheeler's Civil Engineering, Von Ott's Graphic 

Statics. 



54 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



DRAWING. 



All of the students of the Freshman and Sophomore 
classes are required to take Drawing ; but only the students 
• in Mechanics and Engineering in the Junior and Senior 
classes. 

The Freshman class is taught linear and free-hand draw- 
ing. The Sophomore class is instructed in the principles 
of orthographic and isometric projections, shade and 
shadows, perspective and tinting. In the Junior class the 
instruction embraces a more extended course in orthographic 
and isometric drawing, perspective, shades and shadows and 
tinting; also sketches of tools and machines, plans, eleva- 
tions and cross-sections of buildings and blue prints. The 
Senior class make topographical drawings, and drawings of 
machines, roofs, bridges, etc., to different scales, and blue 
prints. Plans, profiles and sections of railroad surveys 
complete the instruction in this department. 

Text-Books. 

Freshman Class.— Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thome's 
Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model Drawing. 

Sophomore Class.— Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical 
Perspective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior Class.— Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's Draw- 
ing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the College, 
Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Senior Class.— French, English and American Plates belonging to 
the College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. <- 

ENGLISH AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

PROF. THACH. 
OBJECTS AND METHODS. 

In this department the students pursue a systematic course 
in the English Language and Literature. 

Language is the avenue of approach to all knowledge ; 
the interpretation of words is the fundamental process in 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



55 



education of whatsoever kind. A full course of English is, 
therefore, considered especially important in the technical 
courses of study that do not include the ancient classics. 
Accordingly, the course of English is continued throughout 
the four years of the College curriculum, three hours a 
week, and is made obligatory upon all students, with the ex- 
ception of those pursuing the two first years of the course in 
Latin. In this extended drill in the grammar and literature 
of the English language, the endeavor is made to afford a 
training somewhat equivalent to the ordinary course in the 
classical languages. 

In view of the ill preparation in languages, especially in 
their mother tongue, exhibited by many of the candidates 
for admission to the Freshman Class, it is deemed advisable, 
for the sake of Honest work, to devote a portion of the first 
year to grounding such students in the principles of gram- 
mar. Further, with the idea that an ability to speak and 
write correctly English of the present, and to appreciate the 
literary excellencies of standard authors, is more desirable 
than training in the philological curiosities, and literary 
crudities of Anglo-Saxon literature, the course of study in 
this institution is confined exclusively to the literature of 
Modern English. 

Especial attention is given to the study of the writings, 
themselves, of leading English authors, since direct contact 
with literature is considered more profitable than informa- 
tion merely about literature. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Freshman Class.— Five hours a week; study of grammar, the prin- 
ciples of special and general composition, with frequent brief papers 
illustrating the laws studied ; study of American authors, Irving, Haw- 
thorne, Holmes. 

Whitney's Essentials, Lockwood's Rhetoric, Scudder s American 

Prose. a i • / 

Sophomore Class.— Three hours a week; study of style, analysis of 

selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on historic and literary 
themes. 



56 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 






Abbott's How to Write Clearly, Genung's Rhetoric, Seudder's Selec- 
tion from Longfellow, Lowell, Emerson. 

Junior Class. — Three hours a week; Lectures on the History of 
English Literature, Logic, Critical Study of English Classics— Milton, 
Gray, Goldsmith, etc., Essays. 

Shaw's History of English Literature, Hale's Longer English Poems. 

Senior Class.— Two hours a week, first term. Principles of Criti- 
cism, Shakespeare's Julius Csesar, Hamlet, etc. 

ESSAYS AND ORATIONS. 

Theory without practice is as fruitless in the study of 
English as in any other department of study. Practical 
work is indispensable to the successful teaching of English. 

Besides numerous brief papers, illustrative of the subject 
matter of the text- books, set essays or orations are required 
of all these students; for the fourth class, six essays a year; 
six for the third; for the first and second classes, three 
orations each. 

DECLAMATION. 

The old practice of committing pieces to memory for 
" speaking " is cultivated as a means, both of training in the 
art of thinking on the feet, and of storing the mind with the 
diction of finished specimens of English style. 

The Sophomore class is heard weekly throughout the year 
in seotions of ten, once for an hour and a half in rehearsal, 
afterwards in the study hall before the body of students. 

The Senior and Junior classes also deliver their orations 
in public. 

PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

The entire Senior class pursues the study of Intellectual 
Science, twice a week, through the year; and Political 
Economy twice a week during the two last terms. The in- 
struction in this department is by lectures in combination 
with text-books. 

Intellectual Science. —Psychology defined. Value in re- 
lation to moral culture, education, and Natural Sciences. 






Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



57 



The Belations of the Soul to matter. The argument of the 
materialist. Counter arguments. The Faculties of the 
Soul. The nature of Consciousness. Sense Perception. 
Memory, its nature, development, education. Fancy. Im- 
agination. Nature of conceptions. Language. Judgment. 
Eeasoning. Deduction. Induction, etc. Porter's Intel- 
lectual Science. Political Economy. Value ; production of 
wealth ; land ; labor ; capital ; division of labor ; distribution 
of wealth; wages; trades union; co-operation; money \ 
credit; functions of government; taxation; tariff; educa- 
tion, etc. Ely's Political Economy. Lectures by Pro- 
fessor. 

A Post-Graduate Course has been established in Politi- 
cal Economy. The texts used as the basis of the work are 
F. A. Walker's Advanced Political Economy, and Woodrow 
Wilson's State. Topics are assigned for research by the 
student, who is facilitated in his labor by a well chosen 
library, including most of the standard works on political 
economy and government. 

CHEMISTKY. 

PROF. LUPTON. ASSISTANT, L. W. WILKINSON. 

Instruction in this department embraces — 
1. A course of lectures in General Chemistry. 
,2. A course of lectures in Industrial Chemistry. * 

3. A course of lectures in Agricultural Chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with each 
course of lectures, for the practice of chemical analysis and 

chemical research. 

1. Course in General Chemistry: This consists of a 
series of lectures (three per week) extending throughout 
the entire session, and includes a discussion of the funda- 
mental principles of Chemical Philosophy in connection with 
the history, preparation, properties and compounds of the 



58 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



metallic and non-metallic elements, with the main facts and 
principles of Organic Chemistry. In this course the more 
common applications of Chemistry to the Arts and Manu- 
factures are discussed. The apparatus used for experimental 
illustration is extensive, containing the newest and most ap- 
proved instruments necessary for presenting the subject in 
the most attractive and instructive form. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cook's Chemi- 
cal Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. The lectures on Industrial Chemistry ( three per week ) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion in 
detail of the processes and chemical principles involved in 
the most important applications of Chemistry in the Arts 
and Manufactures to the reduction of ores, the preparation 
of materials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, illu- 
mination, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, etc. ' 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suitable 
specimens of raw materials and manufacturing products, 
together with models and diagrams. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Wagner's Chemical. Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as applied 
to Arte and Manufacturing, Ure's Dictionary, Watt's Dictionary, 
Richardson and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy. 

3. Course in Agricultural Chemistry: This consists of 
lectures on Chemistry in its applications to Agriculture (two 
per week), and includes a thorough discussion of the origin 
composition and classification of soils, the composition and 
growth of plants, the sources of plant food and how obtained, 
the improvement of soils, the manufacture and use of fertil- 
izers, the chemical principles involved in the rotation of 
crops, the feeding of live stock and the various operations 
earned on by the intelligent and successful agriculturist 






aaBan«^M 



_ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



59 



BOOKS OF REFERENCE. 



Lupton's Elementary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson 
and Cameron's Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agricul- 
ture in relation with Chemistry, Scientific Journals, Reports of the 
United States Department of Agriculture, and the bulletins and reports 
of the various home and foreign Agricultural Departments and Stations. 

4. The course of systematic Laboratory Work: This 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried on in 
connection with each course of lectures, and embraces the 
practical operation of chemical analysis and synthesis, be- 
ing varied somewhat to suit the individual object of the 

student. 

The laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., 
during six days in the week, are amply supplied with every- 
thing necessary for instruction in chemical manipulation, in 
the qualitative and quantitative analysis of soils, fertilizers, 
minerals, mineral waters, technical products, etc., and in the 
method of prosecuting chemical researches. Unusual facili- 
ties are offered to students who wish to devote their time to 
the special study of practical chemistry. 

Each student on entering the Chemical Laboratory is 
furnished with a work table, a set of re- agent bottles, and 
the common re-agents and apparatus used in qualitative and 
quantitative analysis. At the close of the session he will be 
credited with such articles as may be returned in good 
order; the value of those which have been injured or de- 
stroyed will be deducted from the deposit. 

BOOKS USED. 

In Qualitative Analysis-Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In Quantitative Analysis-Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, Rick- 
ett'B Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of V^™ 1 ^/™*- . . 

In Agricultural Chemical Analysis-Church, Frankland. Official 
methods of the Association of Agricultural Chemists. 



-■ 



60 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 



[For description of the building see page 18.] 

The Chemical Apparatus recently purchased for the laboratory con- 
sists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for practical 
work and investigation. The building is supplied with water and gas 
and every appliance required to meet the demands of modern scientific 
instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus usually sup- 
plied to first-class laboratories, a new and improved Schmidt and 
Hensch's Polariscope has been imported, four short-arm Becker 
Balances of latest pattern, Bunsen Spectroscope, Zeiss' Microscope, 
and other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 

BIOLOGY. 

« 

PROFESSOR ATKINSON. 

Practical Biology. — This subject is presented by lectures 
twice a week to the senior students in Agriculture and 
Chemistry. Ihe first part of the year will be devoted to 
the study of fungi, giving prominence to those which cause 
diseases of cultivated plants. This will be followed with 
the study of insects, including those injurious and beneficial 
to Agriculture. Special attention will be given to methods 
employed in combating the attacks of fungi and insects 
upon plants. 

The reference books will be announced to the classes. The 
department contains a carefully selected library of the 
standard works on mycology and many rare and valuable 
works, besides current periodicals adapted to aid in the 
special investigations carried on in the laboratory. 

Especial opportunities are offered to graduate students 
who desire to pursue advanced work and engage in original 
investigations. 

Facilities for Work. 

At present three rooms are occupied by the department— an office, 
lecture room and laboratory. The office contains the cabinet of fungi, 
the technical library for the department, slate table with a Zeiss 
microscope, re-agents, gas and water fittings. The work in the office 






MB^M^HMMBHBVHHHaHBBH^MHH^MB^H^HMHHMM 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 61 

consists of the examination, indentification and cataloguing of the 
specimens of fungi, beside the special work peculiar to such an office. 
The cabinet is provided with tight drawers, for receiving the mounted 
specimens of fungi. 

Laboratory. —Five slate top tables are devoted to the uee of stu- 
dents, there being 10 Leitz microscopes set apart for them. 

Two small culture rooms contain the plate and test tube cultures of 
fungi and bacteria which are being studied in relation to the plant dis- 
eases they cause. Here they can be handled and studied with little 
danger of contamination from the dust 6t the laboratory. In these 
rooms are kept Rohrbeck Thermostats fitted with automatic cut off 
burners and Lautenschlager's most recent thermoregulator for main- 
taining constant temperatures. 

A Winkel microscope is kept here for the examination of cultures. 
It consists of stand No. 2, with condenser, triple revolver, homogene- 
ous immersion lens 1-24 and 1-14, dry objectives No. 3 and No. 7 f 
oculars 1, 3 and 5, and micrometer ocular. 

A Winkel microscope is also kept for the use of the students, exactly 
like the former, except the 1-24 homogeneous immersion lens. 

The other pieces of apparatus are as follows: 

Steam sterilizer, dry sterilizer, domestic still, instantaneous water 
heater, Pastenr filter, fine and common balances, apparatus for demon- 
strating intramolecular breathing of yeast, the Brendel models of para- 
sitic and sapro-phytic fungi, bacteria and yeast plants, and automatic 
device for rolling culture tubes of nutrient agar agar. 

There are also cases containing a large quantity of the various glass 
vessels, paper, dry and liquid dyes and re-agents, culture media, etc., 
required in modern investigation. 

The laboratory is well lighted from southern and western exposure. 
All the rooms are well fitted with gas and water supply. 

A phytopathological laboratory has recently been fitted up for con- 
ducting investigations on the diseases of plants. While this constitutes 
part of the equipment for the Biologist in Experiment Station work, it 
will be at the disposal of the department for instruction. 

HISTOET AND LATIN. 

PROF. PETRIE. 
HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much to memorize 
facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is laid on 
the fact that History is not a succession of isolated facts, 
but a progressive whole, each event being at once the cause 



^V. 



62 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



and the effect of other events. This casual relation of 
events is closely studied and the students are taught to in- 
vestigate for themselves the growth of ideas, and to trace 
particularly their development in the United States, so as to 
acquire a practical knowledge of the history and present 
workings of our government and institutions. The knowl- 
edge acquired is rendered clear and permanent by frequent 
comparison of customs and laws, and also by diagrams, 
charts and maps. Instruction is given by lectures and text- 
books. 

The course covers two years, and embraces the History of 
the United States, studies on our government and its insti- 
tutions, and on general history. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

First Year: Johnston's U. S. History, Macy's Our Government. 
Second Year: Myer's Mediaeval and Modern History. 

LATIN. 

In this department two objects are kept in view: a knowl- 
edge of the language, and an appreciation of the literature. 

In teaching the Language the following methods are 
used: A systematic course is given in Etymology and 
Syntax. These are taught both deductively from a text- 
book on Grammar and inductively from the Latin text read. 
Latin texts are translated, sometimes at sight, sometimes 
after being assigned for preparation. English passages 
based on a familiar author or illustrative of special construc- 
tions are translated into Latin on the blackboard. Simple 
conversation is carried on in Latin. 

Special emphasis is laid upon the study of Latin Litera- 
ture. In connection with each author studied in class there 
is prescribed a course of reading in English descriptive of 
his life, writings and times. The artistic value of his 
writings is carefully studied and discussed, and frequent 

comparisons are made with modern writers. 



I _ 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



63 



TEXT-BOOKS. 



Freshman Class— Nepos, Virgil, Sallust, Grammar, Composition. 
Sophomore Class — Cicero's Orations, Cicerop Letters, Livy, Com- 
position. 
Junior Class— Ovid, Tacitus, Horace. 
Senior Class — Cicero's De Natura Peorum, Plautiif , Terence. 

AGBICULTUEE. 

PROF. BONDURANT. 

The course of instruction in this department embraces : 
I, Soils ; II, Plants ; III, Domestic Animals. 

In the Freshman class, lectures, extending through the 
third term of the session, treat of soils, their classification, 
physical defects and remedies, causes of diminished fertility, 
and the means used to protect them from waste and to re- 
store fertility, and the theory and practice of surface and 
sub-drainage, &c. These subjects are treated with special 
reference to the different classes of soil in Alabama, omit- 
ting as far as possible, questions involving a knowledge of 

Chemistry and Botany. 

In the Sophomore class, in addition to the discussion of 
the physical properties and treatment of soils, the methods 
of studying their defects and their remedies are also con- 

sidered 

The sources of the important elements of plant food and 
their use upon different soils and plants, saving farm 
manures, making composts, proportioning and applying com- 
mercial fertilizers, the relation of plant growth- to soil and 
atmosphere, terracing and grading land to prevent washing 
plows and plowing, and indeed everything connected with 
tilling the soil, passes under review as foundation work. 

Southern agriculture is then treated-the history natu e 
and cultivation of field crops discussed as regards _ their 
adaptation to, and treatment upon, the soils of Alabama. 

This occupies the first and second terms. 



64 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



The third term is devoted to domestic and commercial 
horticulture, poultry, sheep, cattle-breeding and manage- 
ment of dairy, &c. 

In the Junior class, stock breeding and management are 
completed, and a course in Pomology, including the propa- 
gation of nursery stock, planting, manuring, pruning, culti- 
vating, harvesting and marketing every species of fruit, is 
treated, which occupies the second term. 

In the third term, lectures are delivered upon subjects 
relating to agriculture, the selection, purchase, equipment 
and management of a farm, employment and management 
of labor, Ac. 

Landscape gardening also is taught with special reference 
to the improvement of country homes. 

Drawings and models of agricultural implements and farm 
products will be used to illustrate the lectures. Reference 
will be made to suitable agricultural books, and especial 
reference to the experiments contained in bulletins of other 
agricultural, stations, whenever applicable to the subject un- 
der discussion. 

In this department, practical agriculture is combined with 
class instruction. Opportunities are given, and students are 
required in the second and third classes, to do practical 
field work of an educational character, under the instruction 
and direction of the professor, and they are graded accord- 
ing to their skill. 

The farm instruction will embrace details of farm work, 
assisting in field and feeding experiments, dairy work, care 
and management of farm stock, machinery, propagating 
fruits, grafting and budding, and pfuning vines and fruit 
trees 



Agricultv/ral and Mechanical College. 



65 



MODEBN LANGUAGES 



PROF. BARNWELL. 



The following regular courses are given in French and 

German : 

French. — First Year : Three recitations a week. Dur- 
ing this year the principal object is to acquire a thorough 
knowledge of the elements of grammar, and a correct pro- 
nunciation, together with facility in translating ordinary 
French. Reading is begun at an early stage, and the prin- 
ciples of grammar are illustrated and impressed by frequent 
exercises in rendering English into French. 

Second Year : Three recitations a week. During this 
year, the same line of work is pursued as that begun in the 
previous year. More difficult and varied French is read, 
and careful instruction is given upon the laws of grammar 
and the construction of the language. 

German.— Two Years : Three recitations a week the 
first year, three a week the second year. In this course the 1 
aim and the methods are similar to those in French. 

Special Courses.— In addition to these regular courses, 
additional classes are formed for special study in the litera- 
ture, or for special study in any particular direction desired, 
when the number oi students desiring it is sufficient. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

French-First Year: Joynes-Otto's French Grammar and Intro- 
ductory Reader, Super's French Reader. - . ■. .; 

Second Year: Jeanne d'Arc, L'Avare, Theatre Francias Olassique, 
Heath's French Dictionary recommended. 

German-First Year : Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar, and 
Jovnes , Reader, Andersen's Bilderbuch ohne Bilder. 

Second Year : HaufTs Karavane, Peter Schlemihl, Die Journahsten, 
Heath's German Dictionary recommended. 



5 



66 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

ELECTKICAL ENGINEEEING. 

PROF. MC KISSICK. 

The students in this course will study English, French or 
German, Physics, Mathematics, <fec, as now prescribed for 
the course of Civil Engineering in the Junior and Senior 
years; and, in addition thereto, will prosecute their studies 
in Electricity and Mechanics, as herein described. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Five hours per week for the entire session are devoted to 
the study of the principles of Electricity and Magnetism. 
The student is made familiar with the theoretical principles 
by experiments, illustrations, recitations and lectures. 

Laboratory Work.— Six hours per week are given to 
work in the laboratory. This includes management of bat- 
teries, constructiop of instruments, electrical measurements, 
verification of the principles upon which the measurement 
of currents, electromotive force and resistance are based, &c. 

TEXT-BOOK8. \ 

Ayrton's Practical Electricity, Meadowcroft's Electricity, Desmond's 
Electricity for Engineers, S. P. Thompson's Electricity and Magne- 
tism, Stewart and Gee's Practical Physics. 

SENIOR YEAR. # 

In the Senior year five hours per week are devoted to 
theoretical instruction in Electricity and Magnetism, sup- 
plemented by a course of lectures and practical demonstra- 
tions on the applications of electricity to lighting, electrical 
transmission of energy, electrical welding, telegraphy and 
telephony. 

Encouragement is offered to advanced students for con- 
ducting original investigations, and opportunity is taken to 
stimulate a spirit of scientific inquiry. Courses of reading 





Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



67 



are suggested to such students in connection with their ex- 
perimental work. 

Laboratory work. — Six hours per week are devoted to 
practical laboratory work, including construction of instru- 
ments, electrical measurements, electrolysis, and relation of 
electrical currents to heat and mechanical work, care and 
tests of dynamo, the adjustment and calibration of voltme- 
ters and ammeters, electric lighting, management and care 
of accumulators, energy consumed in lamps, adjustment and 
care of arc lamps, proper wiring of buildings, the applica- 
tion of electricity to street railways, magnetic measurements, 
tests of transformers and motors. 

Drawing and Construction. — Five hours per week in 
the Senior year are devoted to the design and construction 
of electrical machinery. The student is required to make 
original designs of dynamos, motors, transformers, galvano- 
meters, etc., and will be required to construct at least one 
piece of apparatus of bis own design. 



V- 



TEXT-BOOKS. 



Slingo and Brooker's Electrical Engineering, S. P. Thompson's 
Electro Magnet, Thompson's Dynamo Electric Machinery, Fleming's 
Alternate Current Transformer. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, Vols. I and II, by Gordon; 
Electricity and Magnetigm, by Clerk Maxwell; Emtage's Introduction 
to the Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism ; Kempe's 
Electrical Testing, Dredge's Electric Illumination, Vols. I and II; 
Dynamo Electric Machinery, by Carl Hering; The Electro Motor and 
its Applications, by Wetzler and Martin ; Electric Transmission, by 
Kapp ; Electric Lighting, by Atkinson ; Electric Light Installations, by 
Salomons; Alternating Currents of Electricity, byBlakesley; London 
Electrician ; Proceedings of American Institute of Electrical Engineers. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The Electrical Laboratory has a complete line of bat- 
teries, call-bells, annunciators, telegraph sounders, relays, 
keys, magnete, and ail apparatus necessary for first year 



68 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



students in Electrical Engineering. The equipment com- 
prises many fine instruments of precision, Sir Wm. Thom- 
son's standard 100 ampere balance (either for direct or 
alternating currents), Sir Wm. Thomson's graded current 
galvanometer, reading to 600 amperes; also, his graded 
potential galvanometer, reading to 600 volts, Cardew volt- 
meter (for direct or alternating currents), reading to 150 
volts ; Weston's standard ammeter and voltmeter, box of re- 
sistance coils ; Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter and amme- 
ter, standard | micro-farad condenser and Sabine key ; 
Thomson Watt-meter ballistic reflecting galvanometer, 
mirror galvanometer, and several other galvanometers for 
first year students. A battery of fifty-five Julien accumula- 
tors has been installed in the Laboratory, and a like battery 
in the department of Natural History. 

In the Dynamo room the following are installed : One 
Weston 150 volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat; one 
Brush 6 arc-light dynamo, with regulator and six lamps ; 
one Edison compound wound 12 kilo-watt generator; a 
Crocker- Wheeler one-horse power motor and rheostat, and 
one alternator, made by special students, furnish current to 
the laboratory and light up the different buildings. 

The dynamos occupy a separate room from the Laboratory, 
and are operated by a 35 horse-power Westinghouse vertical 
engine. 

This department, being provided with Sir Wm. Thomson's 
standard electrical instruments for exact measurements, will 
calibrate any ammeter or voltmeter that may be sent to the 
College free of expense. / 

An electro-motor, supplied with current from a generator 
at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, silo 
cutter and feed cutter at the Experiment Station farm. 
This motor not only subserves a useful purpose in the opera- . 
tion of these machines, but is an excellent illustration of the 
electric transmission of power. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 69 

MECHANIC ARTS. 

J. J. WILMOBE, M. E., DIRECTOR. 
B. A. BLAKEY, B. H. CRENSHAW, ASSISTANTS. 

The course in Manual Training covers three years, as 
follows : First year, wood-working — carpentry and turn- 
ing; second year, pattern-making and foundry and forge 
work — moulding, casting and smithing ; third year, machine 
shop — chipping and filing and machine work in metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the three 
lower classes. For satisfactory reasons a student may be 
excused from this laboratory work by the Faculty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in three 
exercises of two hours each. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 
from a twenty-five horse power Harris-Corliss automatic engine, which 
is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel horizontal tubular 
boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the feed water form a part of 
the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial brick boiler- 
house and chimney have been erected. 

The equipment for the wood-working shop comprises the following: 
30 wood-working benches, each with complete set of carpenter's 
tools; 24 turning-lathes, 10-inch swing, each with complete set of tools ; 
1 double circular saw ; 1 band saw ; 1 board-planing machine ; 1 buzz 
planer; 2 scroll saws (power), 1 large pattern-maker's lathe, 16-inch 
swing; 1 36-inch grindstone. In addition to these, the tool room is 
supplied with a variety of extra hand-tools for special work. 

The equipment for tn*e foundry consists of moulding-benches for 18 
students, each supplied with a complete set of moulder's tools; a 14- 
inch cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of melting 1,000 
pounds of iron per hour ; a brass furnace in which can be melted 100 
pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, etc. Also a 
full supply of ladles, large and small moulding flasks, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 16 hand forges of new pattern, 
each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast for all the forges 
is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower (which also 
furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No. 15 Sturtevant ex- 
haust blower draws the smoke from the fires into the smoke-flues and 
forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building 30x50 feet, and is 



> 



c 



:j v 



...» 



70 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



equipped with 6 engine-lathes (screw-cutting), 14-inch swing, 6-foot 
bed; 2 engine-lathes, 16-inch swing Cone with taper attachment); 
I screw cutting lathe, 8-inch swing; 1 speed lathe, 10-inch swing; 
1 20-inch drill press ( power- feed ) ; 1 15-inch shaper; 1 22-inch x 22- 
inch x 5 foot friction planer ; 1 universal milling machine ; 1 corundum 
tool-grinder (14-inch wheel); 1 bench grinding-machine (small); 
1 post drill press (14-inch). A part of this room is set apart for vise- 
work, chipping and filing ; and benches for 12 students are provided 
each with vise and sets of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool! 
room is to be found a good supply of machinists' tools for general shop 
use, such as lathe and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, 
files, cutting and measuring tools, and special appliances for machine 
work, with machine for grinding twist drills. 

The nature of the work in each department is as follows : 

First Year. 

I. A course of carpentry (hand work covering the first 
two terms and part of the third, or about five months). 

The lessons include instruction on the nature ancl use of 
tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary 
work with plane, saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, timber- 
splices, cross joints, mortise and tenon, mitre, and frame 
work, dovetail work, comprising different kinds of joints 
used in cabinet making, light cabinet work, examples in 
building, framing, roof -trusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning, extending through the third 
term. The lessons comprise, first, nature and use of lathe 
and tools, plain straight turning caliper work to different 
diameters and lengths, simple and compound curves, screw 
plate and chuck- work, hollow and spherical turning. 

Second Tear. 

I. A course in pattern-making, covering the first half of 
the first term. The work includes a variety of examples of 
whole and split patterns, core work, etc., giving the students 
familiarity with the use of patterns for general moulding. 

II. A course in moulding and casting in iron and brass 
occupying ten weeks. The work consists for the most part 



*c 






?. 










y^ 



J 



\. 



PL//M OF 



OF 



MECHANIC ARTS 

ALA. POLY INST. 

SCALE Ifi'l' 



INDEX 



A 


WORKBENCHES 


R 


SPEED LATH* 





BAND £AW 


8 


MILLING MACHINfl 


C 


SCKOLL SAW 


T 


ENGINE 





BATTFrtAJ LATHfl 


u 


DYNAMO 


E 


CJRCULAW SAW 


V 


MOULDING BENCHES 


F 


GRINDSTONE 


w 


CUPOLA 


G 


BVZZ'PLANCR 


X 


BRASS FURNAOE 


H 


SURFACE " 


V 


FORGES 


J 


Dff/LL PRM5 


z 


AA/WLS 


K 


FILIfVO BENCH €9 


a 


WOOD LATHES 


L 


ENGINE LATHES 


1 


BLOWERS 


M 


BENCH GRINDER 


c 


HEATER 


N 


TOOL »• 


</ 


PUMP 





POST DRILL 


1 


BOILEfi 


P 


SHAPE* 


/ 


CLOSETS 


a 


PLANER 





SINKS 




h SHAFT LfNES 






k BENCHES 










dhimnty 



\ 



„jj,i. : w«jpp 



Agricttitwal and Mechanical College. 



71 



of small articles, such as light machine parts, but a suffi- 
cient variety of forms are introduced for the student to ac- 
quire a good general and practical knowledge of the usual 
methods and appliances used in light foundry work Most 
of the work is in green sand in two part flasks; core work is 
also given, and some three part flask and some dry sand 
work is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made by 
students are used, besides special patterns for occasional 
larger or more complicated work. Instruction and practice 
is given in working the cupola, each student in turn taking 
charge of a melting. 

III. A course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying 
the remainder of the year. The lessons are arranged so 
that the students, in making the series of objects, become 
familiar with the nature of the metals and the successive 
steps in working them by hand into simple and complex 
forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, 
welding by various methods, tool-forging, tempering, hard- 
ening, etc. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lec- 
tures is given on the metallurgy and working of the metals 
used in the industrial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, 
brass, etc. 

Thied Teae. 

I. A course of chipping and filing, covering ten weeks 
of the first term. The lessons comprise work on cast and 
wrought iron ; chipping to line on flat and curved surfaces, 
key-seating, etc. ; filing and finishing to line (straight and 
curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, slotting, dove- 
tail work, sliding and tight fits, sawing, pin, screw and key 
filing, surface finishing with scraper, etc. 

IL Machine work occupying the remainder of the year. 
The work includes cast and wrought iron, steel and brass : 






72 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



turning to various diameters and lengths, taper turning, 
facing with chuck and face plate, drilling— both in lathe and 
drill .press — reaming, boring, screw-cutting in lathe and with 
taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc., with planer and shaper, 
milling various forms with the milling machine, including 
exercises in making taps, reamers, etc., fitting, grinding, 
polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various sub- 
jects connected with machine work in metals: Such as 
forms, construction arid use of the various machines, cutting 
tools, gearing, gauges, screw threads, etc. During the last 
term some piece of construction work is given the classes. 

Instruction is generally given, first, by black-board draw- 
ings or sketches which the student copies, with dimensions 
in note-book, with which each one provides himself ; thus 
each one works from his own notes. This is supplemented, 
whenever necessary, by the actual construction of the lesson 
by the instructor before the class, second by inspection and 
direction at the bench by the instructor. The construction 
work is made from blue prints made by the class in draw- 
ing. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

J. J. WILMOKE. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

' To receive the Degree of B. Sc. in the Electrical and 
Mechanical Engineering the student must complete the 
course of Mechanical Engineering as here described. 

Principles of Mechanism,— Two terms are devoted to this 
subject. Under this head machines are analyized and their 
elementary combinations of mechanism studied. The com- 
munication of motion by gear wheels, belts, cams, screws 
and link-work, 4he different ways of obtaining definite 








• 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



73 



velocity ratios and definite changes of velocity, parallel 
notions and quick return motions as well as the designing of 
trains of mechanism for various purposes, together with the 
theoretical forms of teeth for gear wheels to transmit the 
motion through these trains, are investigated under this 
subject. The text book work is illustrated by the study and 
examination of the machines in the laboratory. 

The last term will be devoted to the study of the proper- 
ties of steam, preparatory to the study of the Steam Engine 
in the Senior year. The subject of steam boilers will re- 
ceive special attention, and tests will be made to determine 
the evaporative efficiency of the boiler, furnishing power. 

Mechanical Drawing.- During the first term the students 
make drawings to exact scale, of some of the simpler ma- 
chines. The student takes his own measurements and makes 
his own sketches from which to make the finished drawing. 

This is followed by work intended to be supplemental to 
the work in Mechanism. Involute and epicycloidal gear 
wheels, bevel wheels and endless screws are designed and 
drawn to scale from data given by the instructor. During 
the last term each student will make working drawings of 
some machine in the laboratory with instruction in the 
making of tracings and the art of blue-printing. 

Laboratory Work.-The laboratory work will consist of 
hand work in iron and machine work in iron, as given in 
the course in mechanic arts in the third year. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Steam Engine-One half the year will be given to the 
study of the theory and efficiency of the steam engine, with 
discussions of the effects of condensation in cylinder, action 
of fly-wheels, effect of jacketing, etc. Simple and com- 
pound engines, various valves and cut-off motions, and the 
pricipal types of modern engines are studied. Special at- 
tention is given to the steam engine indicator, and the 






« 



74 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



student is expected to become familiar with its application 
and uses. 

Machine Design.— In the last half of the year the subject 
of Machine Design will be taken up and carried on in con- 
nection with the Strength of Materials, the latter being 
studied mainly from actual experiments made on the testing 
machine. In the former, simple machines are given to work 
under specified conditions. The motions being laid out and 
the proportion of parts found by calculation. 

Mechanical Drawing.— The drawing for the first half year 
will embrace Practical Perspective with exercises in tinting 
and line-shading. In the last half year the drawing will be 
in connection with the work in Machine Design, and ma- 
chines and parts of machines will be designed and drawn 
to scale, with full sets of working drawings. 

Laboratory Work.-The laboratory work will consist of 
making tests of engines under varying conditions of load 
and speed These results will be carefully recorded, tabu- 
lated and filed away for future reference. 

Also of making tests of the strength of the different ma- 
terials of construction, stone, wood, cast and wrought iron, 
steel, etc. These will be tested for transverse, tensioniai 
^compressions! strains, and all results recorded and tabu- 

POST-GRADUATE WORK. 

Students sufficiently qualified, who desire post-graduate 
Thand TK aCC °.r ° dat6d ^ the extent of £> appliances 
deve oi fT m \ b6 6XpeCted *° 8tud ? *P the ^ and 

solve ™wl • 8 ^ucture of the steam engine, and 

s'oos^ • n- gen6ral 6D ^eenn g , s«ch as Ligning 
cations IT . m6S ° f W ° rk ' makiD S dra ™g« «"* £*»- 

ST^T* m ° 8t eCODOmical -angement of ma- 
rines and transmission machinery. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



75 



TESTING APPARATUS. 

For the experimental work in Mechanical Engineering the 
following apparatus has been provided : 

A testing Machine, capable of exerting compressional, 
tensional and transverse strains up to 35,000. 

A steam engine Indicator, planimeter, micrometer and 
other implements for steam engine testing. 

A Harris Corliss twenty-five horse power engine* a West- 
inghouse thirty-five horse power engine, a steam pump, 
steam boilers and the use of the laboratory for special work. 

TEXT AND KEFKBBNCE BOOKS. 

Stahl and Wood's Elmentary Mechanism. 

Goodeve, Steam Engine. 

Busbridge, Engineering Drawing Copies. 

Barr, Treatise on High Pressure Steam Boilers. 

Brown & Sharpe, Treatise on Gearing. 

Davidson, Practical Perspective. 

Grant, Odontics. 

Hemenway, Indicator Practice and Steam Engine Economy. 

Klein, Machine Design. 

MacOord, Treatise on the Slide Valve. 

Pray, Twenty years with the Indicator. 

Bose, Mechauical Drawing Self-Taught. 

Rose, Modern Steam Engines. 

Thurston, Manual of the Steam Engine. 

Appletori's Clyeopsedia of Applied Mechanics. 

MILITAET SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

LIEUT. J. H. WILLS, U. S. ARMY, COMMANDANT. 

Military Science and Tactics are requited to bo taught in 
this institution by law. This law is faithfully carried out by 
imparting to each student, not physically incapacitated to 
bear arms, practical instruction in the School of the Soldier, 
of the Company and of the Battalion ; also in Guard Mount- 
ings, Inspections, Dress Parades, Reviews, etc. 

Under section 12^5, U. S. Revised Statutes, the College 
is provided with modern Cadet rifles and accoutrements and 






• 



r% 



76 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

two pieces of field artillery. Ammunition for practice firing 
is used under the direction of an experienced officer. The 
exercises in target practice and artillery drill begin the first 
day of the third term, March 27th. 

The following uniform of standard Cadet gray cloth has 
been prescribed for dress, viz. : Coats and pants as worn 
at West Point, with sack coat for fatigue, dark blue Cadet 
cap. A neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained here 
at $18 to $19. This is less expensive than the usual cloth- 
ing. All students are required to wear this uniform during 
the session. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
The officers are selected for proficiency in drill, deportment 
and studies. Each company is officered by pne. Captain, 
two 1st Lieutenants, one 2d Lieutenant, and with a proper 
number of non-commissioned officers. The officers and 
non-commissioned officers are distinguished by appropriate 
insignia of rank. These appointments are confirmed by 
th^President on nomination of the Commandant. 

The Junior Class recites once a week in the United States 
Infantry Tactics. 

The Senior Class recites once a week in " Notes on Mili- 
tary Science." 

* 
VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

During the second term ot this session Dr. C. A. Cary 
delivered a course of lectures to the students in agriculture 
on Veterinary Science. To illustrate his instruction he used 
the mounted skeletons of the horse, ox, hog, and sheep with 
which the department of Agriculture is now provided. 

Special lectures were delivered to the farmers every Sat- 
urday, and free clinics, for their benefit, conducted at the 
Station. 




Agriculhiral and Mechanical College. 
POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 



77 



There are three Post-Graduate Degrees- MASTER OF SCIRNCE, 
MINING ENGINEER and CIVIL ENGINEER. 

A Post-Graduate Degree may be obtained by a graduate 
of this College, or of any other institution of equal grade, 
by one year's residence at the College, spent in the success- 
ful prosecution of a course of study in applied science pre- 
scribed by the Faculty. 

Candidates must also present to the Faculty a* satisfactory 
thesis, showing independent investigation upon some sub- 
ject pertaining to their course of study, and must pass a 
satisfactory examination on the course of study prescribed. 
The examination is written, and also oral, in the presence of 

the Faculty. 

Applicants for Post-Graduate Degrees are, by order of 
the Board, permitted to matriculate without payment of fees. 

They are subject to the general regulations as other 
students, but are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates, who are not candidates for a degree, 
are permitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in any 
department of the College, chemical laboratory, without 
payment of regular fees. 

Distinctions. 

Distinctions are awarded in the different subjects of each 
class to those students whose grade for the entire year is 

above 90 per cent. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on Com- 
mencement day to those who obtain an average of 90 per 
cent, in all the prescribed studies of a regular class, and also 
to those who obtain three distinctions in the freshman class, 
four in the sophomore or junior class, and five in the senior 
class, provided they have satisfactorily passed all the regular 
examinations of thai session. 









i 






- 






78 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

PHOTOGEAPHT. 

During the second term there will be given by Professor 
Mell a course of twelve lectures on photography. This 
course will be elective, and the instruction will be opened 
to any student who may desire to learn how to make pictures. 
It will be necessary for each student to provide himself with 
an outat that will cost from $11.50 to $16.00. 

.RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are 
kept by the officers of instruction. 

From the record a monthly circular, or statement, is sent 
to the parent or guardian. 

' EXAMINATIONS. 

Written recitations, or monthly examinations on the studies 
of the month, are held at the option of the professor. 

At the end each term written or oral examinations, or 
both, are held on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the Faculty, 
and in no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final ex- 
amination, can be promoted to full standing to the next higher 
class, only on satisfactory examinations at the opening of 
the next session. 

It is required that every student who enters the College 
shall remain through the examinations at the end of the 
term. Leaves of absence and honorable discharges will, 
therefore, not be granted within three weeks of the examina- 
tion, except in extreme cases. 

Examinations for degrees, or certificates of proficiency, 
embrace the entire subject of study in the course. 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

LIBRARY. 



19 



A commodious room in the new building has been appro- 
priated to the library. It is designed to make it an import- 
ant educational feature of the college. At present it con- 
tains a number of valuable reference books, books of the 
standard authors, and others suitable for students. During 
the present session the library has been increased by the 
addition of 3500 volumes of carefully selected standard works 
for general reading, and for investigation. It is kept open 
daily from six to eight hours for the use of students as a 
reading room. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the 
President and Faculty, in accordance with the code of laws 
and regulations enacted by the Trustees v 

Attention to study, and punctuality in attendance on recita- 
tions and all other duties, are required of every student. 

MILITARY DRILL. 

There are three regular military drills each week, and all under- 
graduate students, -not physically incapaciated to bear arms, are re- 
quired to engage in these exercises. 

The drills are short, and the duty involves no hardships. The mili- 
tary drill is a health-giving exercise, and its good effects in the devel- 
opment of the physique and improvement of the carriage of the Cadet 
are manifest. 

Privates of the first class may be excused by the President from all 
military drills, and also students over twenty-one years of age at the 
time of entering College, who are permitted to devote their time to one 
special study, as chemistry, agriculture, etc. 

RELIGIOUS SEE VICE. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and 
also to attend the church of their choice at least once on 
Sunday. 



I 






#* < 






80 Agricultural and Mechanical College. , 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes 
every Sunday. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized, and through its 
weekly meetings exerts a wholesome Christian influence 
among the students of the College. 

The first week of the session a committee of the Associa- 
tion will meet the trains, whose business will be to give in- 
formation to, or assist in any way they can, the students 
entering College for the first time. The Association is com- 
mended to all the students. 
The following are the officers : 

E. C. Spratling, President. 

E. B. Mell, Vice-President. 

W. C. H. Smith, Corresponding Secretary. 

J. S. Johnson, Recording Secretary. 

W. F. Clayton, Treasurer. 

GYMNASIUM. 

The fourth floor of the college building is one large attic 
room, well lighted and ventilated. It has been supplied with 
a number of such appliances as are used in a gymnasium, 
and is used for athletic exercises by the students, in the after- 
noon, under prescribed regulations. 

LOCATION. 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, fiftv-nine 
miles east of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Rail- 
road. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general 
good health and freedom from malaria, having an elevation 
of eight hundred and twenty-one feet above tide water. By 
statute of the State, the sale of spirituous liquors and keep- 
ing saloons of any kind are forbidden. 



r 








Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

THESIS. 



81 



Each applicant for a degree is required to write and sub- 
mit to the Faculty an essay or oration and read or deliver 
the same at Commencement, if required by the Facnlty. 

It must be given to the Professor of Engfish by the first 
of May. -~N 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two Literary Societies connected with the Col- 
lege—the Wirt and Websterian. Each has a hall in the col- 
lege building. 

These societies hold celebrations on the evenings of 
Thanksgiving Day and the 22d of February, and also Com- 
mencement week. They elect annually, with the approval 
of the Faculty, an orator to represent them at the close of 
the year. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel 
services, oratorical exercises in declamation and in original 
orations are conducted by the Professor of English, in pres- 
ence of the Faculty and students. 

The first and second terms the students of the junior and 
sophomore classes are exercised in original orations and 

declamation. 

The second and third terms the members of the senior 
class read essays or deliver original orations. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The Annual Alumni Oration, by a member of the society, 
is delivered in the chapel on Alttmni day, Tuesday of Com- 
mencement week. The following are the officers of the 

society. 

T. H. Frazer, M. D., President 
J. 0. Street, Vice-President. 
0. 0. Thaoh, Treasurer and Secretary. 
6 






82 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

BOARDING. 

The College has no barracks nor dormitories, and the 
students board with the families of the town of Auburn, and 
thus enjoy all the protecting and beneficial influences of the 
family circle. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it 
is to report those who, without permission, leave their rooms 
after the "call to quarters," or are guilty of any violation of 
orderder. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not 
permitted to make changes without obtaining permission 
from the President, and this permission is given only at the 
close of a term, except for special reasons. 

EXPENSES. 

Incidental fee, per half session $ 2 50 

Library fee, per half session , j qq 

Surgeon's fee, per half session 2 50 

Board per month, with fuel and lights .$12 to 15 00 

These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and $6.00 
on February 1st. By order of the Board no fees can be re- 
mitted. 

There is no charge for tuition. 

For students entering after January 1st, the fees for half 
session only are required. 

EXPEN8E6 FOR COLLEGE YEAR. 

J ee8 y;v; • ....$ 12 ooto$ 12 oo 

Hoard, lodging, fuel and lights 108 00 to 135 00 

Washing........ 900to 900 

Books, etc., say _ 8 00 to lg 0Q 

$137 00 to $171 00 

This does not include uniform, as the cost is not more 
than ordinary clothing. 




«. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
CONTINGENT FEE. 



83 



A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be deposited 
by each student on matriculation, to cover any special or 
general damage to college property for which he may be 

liable. ( 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent 

fee, or the unexpended balance, will be refunded to the 
student. 

AMOUNT OF DEPOSIT. 

Each student on entering College should deposit with the 
Treasurer not less than $50.00, to pay the expenses of fees, 
one month's board, uniform, books, etc. 

UNIFOKM. 

A uniform of Cadet gray cloth is prescribed which all 
under-graduate students are required to wear during the 
session. The uniforms are made by contractor of cloth manu- 
factured at the Charlottsville mills. The suit including cap, 
costs about $19.00; the dress coat $10.00 to $11.00. It is 
neat and serviceable and less expensive than ordinary cloth- 
ing. 

SUBGEON. 

The Surgeon is required to be present at the College 
daily, to visit the Cadets at their quarters who are reported 
sick, and to give all requisite medical attention without 
other charge than the regular Surgeon's fee, paid on enter- 
ing College. 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are, advised to deposit with the Treasurer < >f 
the College alllunds desired for sons or wards, whether fo regu ar 
charges of College fees or board, or for any other purpose^ It .8 the 
duty of this officer to keep safely all funds p aced -n hi. hands. ^an to 
pay all expenses incurred by the students, includ.ng board, un.form, 
books, etc., when approved. 






.•■ 



■ 



84 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treasurer of the 
College by the cadet to pay his necessary expenses. These checks are 
paid only when approved by the President. This approval is given 
only for necessary expenses, as stated in the Catalogue, unless spe- 
cially requested in writing by the parent. 

The College cannot be held responsible for the expenses of a student, 
unless the funds are deposited with the Treasurer. No student should 
be permitted to have a large amount of pocket money, as it only brings 
trouble and encourages idleness. 

ACADEMIC TEAR. 

The Academic Year commences on Wednesday, 14th 
September (second Wednesday after first Monday), and 
ends on Wednesday, 14th June (the second Wednesday after 
the first Monday), which is Commencement day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the 23d of December; 
the second term begins January 2d, and ends March 25th ; 
the third term continues from March the 27th to the close 
of the session. 



j 



RESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 

The following resolution was adopted by the Trustees : 

That in view of increased facilities for instruction in Agriculture and 
the technical departments of education now possessed by this College, 
especially in the department of Mechanic Arts, made possible by the 
recent donation from the State, the Faculty are authorized, in addition 
to the legal name of this College, to print on the Catalogue the words 
ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, as significant of ^ex- 
panded system of practical instruction in industrial science in the 
courses of education now provided for. 



DONATIONS TO LIBRARY. 

Secretary of the Interior-Senate and House Reports, Mineral Re- 
sources, Consular Reports, Geological Survey, Ordnance Report, 
Bureau of Ethnology, Geodetic Survey., 50 vols. 

Hon. John T. Morgan, Public Documents, 7 vols. 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 85 

Hon. James L. Pugh, Public Documents, 2 vols. 

Hon. W. C. Oates, War of Rebellion, Congressional Record, 7 vols. 

Hon. Robert Porter, Superintendent of Census, Bulletins, etc. 

Hon. W. T. Harris, Commissioner of Education, Pamphlets, etc , 8 
vols. 

Sir John B. Lawes, England, Rothamstead Memoirs, 9 vols. 

Prof. Joseph H. Gilbert, F. R. S., Lectures on Agricultural Chem- 
istry, 1 vol. 

DONATIONS TO THE ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The following donations have been made to the Electrical 
Department by the manufacturers named: 

Patrick & Carter, Philadelphia, Pa 10 call annunciator. 

W. R. Ostrander & Co., New York electric call bell. 

Franklin Eiecti ic Co. , New York .... primary batter^ . 

John J. Murray & Co., Philadelphia, Pa shades. 

National Electric Co., Philadelphia, P Warren fuse blocks. 

The Kartavert Manufacturing Co., Wilmington, Del., samples of 

kartavert. 
The Lunkenheimer Brass Co , Cincinnati, Ohio, sight feed lubricator. 
The Economic Electric Manufacturing Co., Boston, incandescent 

lamps. 
Leffel Water Wheel Engine Co., Springfield, Ohio, photographs of 

turbines. 
The Pittsburg Reduction Co., Pittsburg, Pa., samples of aluminum 

and aluminum bronze. 
American Electrical Works, Providence, R. I., samples of wire and 

cordacre 
Holmes, Booth & Hayden, New York, samples of wires, cables, &c. 
Maine Electric Improvement Co., Brunswick, Me., incandescent 

lamps . 
Union Electric Manufacturing Co., Bridgeport, Conn., sample socket. 
Bernstein Electric Co., Boston, Mass., combination socket and lamp. 
Thomson Welding Co., Boston, Mass., ...samples of electric welding. 

Alexander, Barney & Chapin, New York incandescent lamps. 

C.8. VanNuis, New York V ^"vl 

J. H. Bunnell & Co., New York Burnley Dry battery. 

Empire China Works, Brooklyn, New York, samples of hard porce- 

LaminTr Fibre Works Co. , Boston samples of fibre . 

The Leclanche Battery Co., New York .... samples of Leclanche eel s . 
Interior Conduit & Insulation Co., New York .... samples of conduits 

The Bryant Electric Co., Bridgeport, Conn • wal 80 ?™- 

Billings & Spencer, Hartford, Conn samples of commucator bars. 



86 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Standard Underground Cable Co., Pittsburg, Pa., samples of cables. 

Bowers Bros., Chicago, 111 samples of electrical mica. 

Solar Carbon Co., Cleveland, , .. samples of carbon, carbon brushes, 
battery carbons, &c. 

Gethin's Electrical Manufacturing Co Gethin's gravity battery. 

New York Insolated Wire Co., New York, case of wires, cables, &c. 

Western Electric Co., New York, samples of wire. 

The Simplex Electrical Co , Boston samples of caoutchouc wires. 

U. S.Mineral Wool Co., New York .... copper gaskets . 

Southern Electric Co., Lynchburg, Va ........... incandescent lamps. 

Wilmot&Hobb's Manufacturing Co., Bridgeport, Conn., . steel gong. 

American Circular Saw Co., Boston, samples of woven covered insu- 
lated wires. 

Alfred F. Moore, Philadelphia, Pa samples of wires. 

Union Porcelain, Works, Brooklyn, N. Y., samples of porcelain goods. 

The S. S. White Dental Manufacturing Co., Philadelphia, Pa., Partz 
acid gravity battery . 

Consolidated Electric Manufacturing Co., Boston . Davis' cut out. 

The Standard PaintCo., New York . P. & B. paint. 

Union Hardware Co., Torrington, Conn ; push button shells. 

Wallace and Sons, Ansonia, Conn., samples of hard drawn copper wire. 

The Goodrich Hard Rubber Co.^ Akron, 0., samples of hard rubber 
goods. 

Pass & Seymour, Syracuse, NY. samples of porcelain goods. 

A. W. Harris' Oil Co. , Providence, R. I dynamo oil. 

Taylor & Son, New York Taylor's primary battery. 

The Underwood Manufacturing Co , Tolland, Conn belting. 

Hart & Hegeman Manufacturing Co., Hartford, Conn., Hart switch. 

H. T. Paiste, Philadelphia, Pa Paiste sockets. 

Solar Carbon Co., Pittsburg, Pa., battery carbons, carbon brushes, 
electric light carbons. 

Vulcanized Fibre Co., Wilmington, Del., samples of vulcanized fibre. 

The Gould & Watson Co., Boston, samples of moulded mica insulators. 

National Electric Manufacturing Co., Eau Claire, Wis., 30 It, 1,000— 
50 volt transformer. 

F. Reddi way & Co. , New York — Camel hair belting. 

Atlantic Covering Co., Plymouth, Mass samples of wire. 

Steele Johnson Manufacturing Co., Waterbury, Conn., shade holders. 

The C. Mclntire Co., Newark, N. J copnectors . 

A. O. Schoonmaker, N. Y ." * mica 

T. M. Robertson, N. Y .'/ fibrous batteries. 

N. Y. & Ohio Co., Warren, O '../.:.... incandescent lamps. 

John Simmons jCo., N. Y., model electric pole and lightning tapper. 

The Perkins Electric Switch Co., Hartford socket. 

H. W. Johns, Manufacturing Co., New York, sample case of pipe cov- 
erings, etc. 



i 

f 



i 




I 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



87 



Jenkins Bros., New York Jenkins valves, etc. 

J. A. Roebling's Sons Co., Trenton, N. J samples of cables, etc 

Eureka Tempered Copper Co., North East, Pa commutator bars . 

Pierce Bros. & Co., Leominister, Mass Trolley fixtures. 

Wm. H. Weston & Co., Philadelphia, 50 ampere double pole quick 
break switch. 
Dean Steam Pump Co., Holyoke, Mass., steam pump built in section. 

J. W. Devol & Co., New York samples of "Ozokerite." 

Burnhan & Sluggan Railway Appliance Co., Boston, bracket for pole. 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co. , Boston nickel oil cups. 

Berlin Iron Bridge Co . . ... ..... ..^./ ........ photograph. 

Forest Electric Co . , transformer switch . 

The Reis Electric Specialty Co., Baltimore, Md — regulating socket. 
A. S.Cameron PumpCo., New York, N. Y , steam pump built in section . 
Dean Steam Pump Co , Holyoke, Mass photographs of steam pumps. 

Brush Electric Co., Cleveland, photograph of generator. 

National Electric Mf'g Co , Eau Claire, Wis photographs of generator. 

Crocker Wheeler Metor Co. , New York? photograph . 

Pennsylvania Engineering Co., Philadelphia . . . , lamps. 






DONATIONS TO THE MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Frasse & Co., New York, Lathe and Planer Tool. 

Billings & Spencer Co., Hartford, Conn., Screw Cutting Tool. 

Prentice Bros., Worcester, Mass., Lathe Fixture. 

Dodge Manufacturing Co., Mishawaka, Sample Wood Pulley, 24x8 in. 

F. E. Reed & Co., Worcester, Mass., Lattie Fixture. 

The Sebastian-May Co., Sidney, Ohio, Ten-inch Speed Lathe. . 

Gordon Steam Pump Co., Hamilton, Ohio, Framed Engraving. 
> Brown & Sharpe Mf'g Co., Providence, R. L, Book on Construction 
and Use $ Universal Grinding Machines. 

John T. Slocomb, Providence, R. t, Sample Center Drjll. 

Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, Ohio, complete set of Blue Prints of 

Engine. *• .. 

Westcott Chuck Co., Oneida, New York, complete . Drawings and 

Plans of a Light-House. 



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CALENDAR 1892-93. <^ 

Session begins Wednesday, Sept. 14, 

Examination for admission Wednesday, Sept. 14, 

First term begins Wednesday, Sept. 14, 

First term ends Friday, Dec. 23, 

Second term begins .• • .. Monday, Jan. 2, 

Second term ends Saturday, March 25, 

Third term begins U-.» ..... Monday, March 27, 

Sophomore class exercises . Monday, May 1 , 

Final examinations begin Wednesday, May 24, 

■*i Commencement sermon Sunday, June 11, 

^Annual meeting of Trustees ..Monday, June 12, 

Junior class celebration 10 a. m Monday, June 12, 

Military exercises 4 p. m .... Monday, June 12, 

Celebration of Literary Societies 8p.m Monday, June 12, 

Alumni day -■•'.... Tuesday, June 13, 

Military exercises 5 p. m Tuesday, June 13, 

Address before Literary Societies 8 p. m Tuesday, June 13, 

Commencement day .Wednesday, June 14, 



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Dates: 1873, 


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AAA *c AAA I 

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Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama* I 

Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama *h [microform] I 

► 9 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute f 

► 10 246 10 Rules and regulations of the State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Auburn, Alabama I 

► 11 246 10 Catalog of the State Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Alabama f 

► 12 246 10 Catalogue of the State Agricultural & Mechanical College, 
Auburn, Alabama 1 

Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, I 

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d *b 1873 *c 1893 *d alu *e u *f u *g a 1 

Universities and colleges *z Alabama *x Periodicals. I 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue and 
circular of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1 

► 23 78500 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project I 







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AGKICLLI UKAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 
ALAUAMA 1'OLYTECJIMC INSTITUTE. 



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CATALOGUE 



OF THE 




AGRICULTURAL > MECHANICAL 



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Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 









1892-93. 






- 






. 






AUBURN, ALABAMA. 



MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA : 

THE BROWN PRINTING CO., PRINTERS, BINDERS AND STATIONERS, 

1893. 




TRUSTEES. 



His Excellency Thomas G. Jones, President. . . 
J. G. Harris, Superintendent of Education. . . 



. ex-officio. 
. ex-officio. 



I. F. Culver (term expires 1899) Union Springs. 

J. C. Rich .(term expires 1899) Mobile. 

H. Clay Armstrong (term expires 1899) Auburn. 

R. H. Duggar (term expires 1899) Gallion. 



J. G. Gilchrist . . .(term expires 1897). . : . ...... .Hope Hull. 

Wm. Smaw (term expires 1897). Boligee. 

C. C. Harris (term expires 1897) Decatur. 



Jonathan Haralson. . . (term expires 1895) Selma. 

R. F. Ligon (term expires 1895) Tuskegee. 

J. A. Bilijro ..(term expires 1895) Gadsden. 



E. T. Glenn, Treasurer. 




FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



Wm, L«ROY BROUN, M. A., LL. IX, 

President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH. A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, M. E., Ph. D., 

Professor of Natural History and Geology. 

JAMES H. LANE, C. E., A. M., LL. D., 

Profssorof Cirri Engineering and Drawing. 

CHARLES C. THACH, A. M., 

Professor of English and Political Economy 

N. T. LUPTON, A. M., M. D., LL. D, 

Professor ofGewr d an I 4.7 iciltural Ch'nhlry and Slate Chemist. 

GEORGE PETRIE, M. A., Ph. D., 

Professor of History and Latin. 

Lieut. J. H. WILLS, 22nd Infantry, U. S. A. (West Point), 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 

A. J. BONDURANT, 

Professor of Agriculture and Agriculturist of Experiment Station. 

A. F. McKISSICK, A. M., 

Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

J. M. STEDMAN, B. S., 

Professor of Biology. 

CHARLES H.ROSS, C.E., Ph. D, 

Adjunct Professor of Modem Languages and English 
j J WILMORE, M. E., 
Director of Laboratory and Instructor of Mechanical Engineering. 




I 







V 

C. A. CARY, B. So., D. V. M., 
Professor of Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

L. W. WILKINSON, M. So., 
Assistant in Chemical Laboratory. 

B. H. CRENSHAW, M. E., S. J. BUCKALEW, M. Sc, 

Assistant Instructors in Mechanic Arts. 

C. B. Glenn, M. So Assistant in Physics and Library 

G. S. Clark, B. Sc Assistant in Botany 

C. A. Brown, B. So . . Assistant in Drawing 

W. F. Feagin, B. Sc . ..Assistant in Agriculture 

R. F. Hare, B. Sc Assistant in Chemistry 

L.P. Heyman, B. So Assistant in Mathematics 

F. M. Mosley, B. Sc Assistant in Electrical Engineering. 

L. W. Payne, B* Sc . . . Assistant in English. 

W. E. Richards, B. So Asssistant in Biology. 

E. B. Smith, B. So Assistant in English and Mathematics . 

R. J. Trammell, B. Sc Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

J. H. Drake, M. D Surgeon 

■^iP* Thach Librarian and Recording Secretary. 

0. D. Smith. Corresponding Secretary. 




OF THE 



Agricultural Experiment Station, 



BOABD OS 1 VISITORS. 



COMMITTEE OP TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Hon. J. G. Gilchrist. Hope Hull. 

Hon. R. F. Ligon • • Tuskegee. 

Hon. H. Clay Armstrong Auburn. 



BO-A.I2.I3 OB 1 DIRECTION". 

Wm.LeRoy Broun.... ,.- • President. 

A. J. Bondurant Agriculturist. 

N.T.Lupton ....Chemist. 

P H. Mell Botanist and Meteorologist. 

J. M.'stedman '.'.'. '.'.'..... Biol °8 ist - 

CACary Veterinarian. 

ASSISTANTS: 

James Clayton Assl8tant Horticulturist 

•A. F. Cory, B. Sc • Assistant Agriculturist 

J. T. Anderson, Ph. D First Assi8tant Chemi8t 

L. W. Wilkinson, M. Sc Second Assistant Chemist 

P. A. Lupton, M. Sc. Third Assistant Chenus 

B. F. Hare. B. Sc Fourth Assistant Chemist 

g. S. Clark, B. Sc Ota* and Assistant Botamst 

* In charge of Soil-test Experiments. 




OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 



♦ ♦- 



The leading object of the College, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, is to 
teach the principles and the applications of science. 

In its course of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that re- 
late to agriculture and the mechanic arts ; and at the same 
time the discipline obtained by the study of languages and 
other sciences is not neglected. 

All students are required to study the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to students in any 

course. 
The special or technical instruction given is thus based 

on a sound, general education. 

The College, in fact, is a distinctive school of industrial 
science— or Polytechnic Institute— a title which by reso- 
lution of the trustees is permitted to be inscribed on the 
catalogue, —and work of great value to the youth of the State 
is now being accomplished by fitting them by a thorough 
science-discipline, in which manual training in the lo wer 
classes is made a prominent feature, for the successful and 
honorable performance of the responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is ghen to the mental discipline of 
the students in endeavoring to train them to habits of accu- 
rate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them for the 
duties of life, their moral and Christian training will always 
constitute the prominent care and thought of the Faculty. 











8 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOE INSTRUC 

TION. 



The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory 
instruction in applied science in the following departments : 

I. — IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres and is supplied with illustra- 
tive specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in con- 
nection with the College, where experiments and scientific 
investigations relating to agriculture are daily made, affords 
unusual opportunities to students to become familiar with 
agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where lec- 
tures are delivered in presence of the objects discussed, and 
during the year exercises in practical agriculture of an edu- 
cational character are given the students who enter upon 
this course of study. 

II.— IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of mechanic arts is used as an auxiliary 
in industrial education, as a school of manual training in the 
arts that constitute the foundation of various industrial pur- 
suits. The work performed by the students is instructive 
in character, as in any other laboratory, and the classes are 
taught in sections by a series of graded lessons under the 
supervision of the professor. In the lower classes of the 
College each student enters this school, and is assigned three 
exercises a week, each exercise being tw hours long. 

The object of this laboratory is not t teach a trade, but 
to educate, to discipline and train the eye and the hand, as 
well as the mind, and thus by associating manual and mental 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



training, to educate thoroughly the student for the duties of 
life, whatever his vocation may be. There is no attempt to 
teach students special skill in constructing articles of com- 
mercial value, but all the exercises are systematically ar- 
ranged and designed for purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall 
90 x 50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse-power 
Corliss engine, a planer, circular saw, hand-saw, two scroll 
saws, a buzz planer, twenty-four stands with lathe and full 
set of lathe tools for each, and thirty benches for carpenter 
work with the tools requisite for construction. 

A brick building, 30 x 87 feet with two rooms, has been 
constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with sixteen forges and tools re- 
quired for a forge department, and the other with a cupola 
furnace, having a capacity of 1000 pounds per hour, a core 
oven, a brass furnace, moulding benches and special tools 

for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a 
Sturtevant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from a 
ten horse-power engine, constructed by the students in 

mechanic arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 30 x 50 
feet, and is equipped with ten engine lathes, one speed lathe, 
one20-inch drill press, one 10-inch sensitive drill, one post 
drill one 16-inch shaper, one 5-foot planer, one universal 
milling machine, a corundum tool grinder, a small emery 
grinder, and a universal cutter and reamer grinder. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches, vises and tools for twelve students. 

The tool room is well supplied with special tools for use 

instruction, including a machine for grinding twist drills. 

A Weston dynamo is used at present for lighting the 
rooms when necessary. 



in 



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10 



Agricultural and Meelianieal Colkge. 



III.— IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The chemical laboratory is supplied with new and modern 
apparatus, and in its entire equipment affords excellent facil- 
ities for instruction in practical chemistry. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this laboratory 
by scientific experts, in connection with the work of the ag- 
ricultural experiment station, are of especial value to ad- 
vanced students, and afford them unusual opportunities to 
learn the methods of scientific research. The building con- 
tains a large general laboratory that will accommodate sixty 
students, a lecture room with capacity for one hundred 
seats, and nine other rooms, all appropriated to instruction 
and research in chemistry. 

It is equipped with the improved modern appliances nec- 
essary for instruction and investigation. 



d 



IV.— IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. ' 

The electrical laboratory is well supplied with modern 
appliances for instruction in electrical engineering. It occu- 
pies two large rooms in the basement, and is equipped with 
a Weston 150 volt, 20 ampere dynamo ; one Brush 6 arc- 
light dynamo, with regulator ; one Edison compound wound 
12 kilo-watt generator ; a Crocker- Wheeler one horse-power 
motor and rheostat, and one alternator, made by special 
students. 

The dynamos occupy a separate room from the labora- 
tory, and are operated by a thirty-five horse-power Westing- 
house vertical engine. 

The equipment comprises many fine instruments of pre- 
cision: Sir Wm. Thomson's standard 100 ampere balance, and 
his graded current galvanometer, reading to 600 amperes • 
also his graded potential galvanometer, reading to 600 
volts; Cardew voltmeter, reading to 150 volts; Weston's 
standard ammeter and voltmeter; ballistic reflecting gal- 
vanometer, mirrow galvanometer, Thomson watt-meter, etc. 




Agricultural and 3Iechanical Coltege. 



11 



A battery of fifty-five Julien accumulators has also been in- 
stalled in the laboratory. There is also in connection with 
this department a ten horse-power motor at the experiment 
station farm (a thousand yards from the College,) which is 
run by the Edison generator at the electrical laboratory. 



j 



i) 



V. — IN PHYSICS. 

In the College building provision is made for laboratory 
work in the department of physics. Special rooms in the 
basement are appropriated for this purpose, and are equipped 
with the necessary appliances for instruction in practical 
physics. 

Y! # — in MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the base- 
ment, and is provided with tables and appliances to accom- 
modate thirty students, with an excellent collection of 
minerals. 

VII. — IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station, inves- 
tigations in botany are given special attention and opportu- 
nities are offered advanced students for practical work m a 
laboratory especially fitted with microscopes, tables a dark 
room for photographic work, and appliances needed or in- 
struction and research. This department is P^ lde ^l 
Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers for teaching 

botany. 

yni.__.iN biology. 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the le^ 
room of the professor, and is furled .r*Jf^£J3 
scopes and appliances for investigation **_^» 
the class works under the supervision of the professor. 



B 





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12 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



IX.— IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including transits, 
levels, plane table, models of bridges, etc., is provided for 
the use of the students, and the customary exercises in the 
field are given. 

X. — IN DRAWING. 

All the students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as well 
as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observation and 
execution. A large, well-lighted drawing room, that will 
accommodate fifty students, is provided with tables, lock 
boxes, etc. 

MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity with 
the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of regular 
military drill, and in addition the military system is used as 
a means of enforcing discipline and securing good order, 
promptness and regularity in the performance of academic 
duties. 

This department is under the charge of Lieut. J H 
Wills, 22nd Infantry, U. S. A. 

It is supplied with new cadet muskets and accoutrements 
for the corps, and for artillery practice, with two three-inch 
rifle guns, carriages and limbers. 





Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
COLLEGE BUILDING. 



13 



The frontispiece is a representation of the recently con- 
structed main College building. It is 160 by 71 feet, and 
contains, exclusive of the basement floor, thirty-five rooms. 
This building is not used for dormitories for students, but 
is appropriated for purposes of instruction and investiga- 
tion. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, 
laboratories, library, museum, armory, etc. The illustra- 
tions of the four floors on the following pages indicate the 
uses foTwhieh the rooms have been assigned. 

The rooms marked in the plan for the laboratories of 
physics and mechanics are used for electrical engineering 
and physics, and the office adjacent to library is the library 
of government publications. 





« 





I 




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Basement Floor 



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Corridor 



As$em'ltyTiQ67rL 






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Physics 



Thysice, 




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Fir st 






AppZvttiisu 


1 '3 1 1 

kg ■ ■ 
Treasurer U 

Floor 










\ Vestibule' 


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23 

£5 



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Scoond Floor 






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3. 






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Third Floor 



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18 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

As shown on the opposite page, is a handsome two-story structure 
40 by 60 feet, with a rear projection 35 by 60 feet of one-story and 
basement. The exterior is of pressed brick, with cut stone trimmings 
and terra-cotta ornamentation. 



■*-* 



ma 






CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 



It-" 




» 

Agricultural and Mechanical College, 



19 







FIRST FLOOR 

The first room to the left is the office ot**^^^**** lithe Stale" 
balanee-room. On the right, extending the whole lengm 01 rQm ^ 

SSS.'SS W«^^^^ an/ tne „«»„.. private 

working-room. 




20 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



* 



D 



() 



() 



D 







Second Floor. 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and contains 
improved working-tables, with water, gas and every necessary appli- 
ance for chemical work. Niches in the wall opposite each working- 
table, with hoods, where necessary, connect with flues, and furnish the 
best possible means of escape for deleterious vapors, while ventilators 
in the ceiling furnish additional means for getting rid of noxious gases. 



■— 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



21 



The height is sixteen feet in the clear, with paneled ceiling of oiled 
southern pine. The rooms are wainscotted throughout and finished in 
natural wood. 

The second story contains a lecture-room and room for gas analysis. 
Around this lecture room are cases for containing crude and manufac- 
tured products, illustrating the subjects of agricultural and industrial 
chemistry, which are prominent subjects taught in this institution. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, ninety by fifty feet. The second story 
is the audience hall, used for Commencement and other public occa- 
sions. 

The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 



II 



GRADUATES IN 1892. 

CLASS OF 1892. 

— ♦ ♦ 

HONOE GRADUATES. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Walter Evan Richards . . . -. Chambers 

COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 

Louis Philip Heyman Georgia. 

Arthur Lyne Jones. Montgomery. 

Frank McLemore Mosley Montgomery. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

Leonidas Warren Payne t 

■ — — **- ... 

Bachelor of Science. 

William Sayre Allen ;' Montgomery. 

Archie Scruggs Averett Georgia. 

Elbert Cathey Averyt _ Shelby. 

Leigh Stafford Boyd L e „ 

Charles Allen Brown 7777777777 Sumter. 

Jacob Thompson Bullen Montgomery. 

George Samuel Clark lvr™*. 

Walter Bartow Clay.. 7. 777777' M^nt"' 

John Gereardt Crommelin 7.7 7' .Montgomery! 

Jesse Locke Culver Bulloci 

Henry Lee Davidson 7. '. 7. '. '. '. ". '. '. .' .' .' .' .' .' . Montgomery. 

Henry T,cknor DeBardeleben . Jefferson. 

Henry Farns Dobbin Florida> 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 23 

William Francis Feagin Barbour. 

James Edward Gachet Lee. 

Eugene Hamiter Graves Barbour. 

Raleigh Williams Greene Lee. 

Raleigh Frederick Hare Lee. 

Louis Philip Heyman Georgia. 

Arthur Lyne Jones Autauga. 

Robert Dibrell McAllister Georgia. 

Frank McLemore Mosley Montgomery. 

Leonidas Warren Payne . . Lee. 

Charles Teed Pollard. Montgomery. 

Walter Evan Richards Chambers. 

Edward Broadus Smith Lee. 

Signor'Sidney Strong . Georgia. 

George Adams Thomas Montgomery. 

Robert Jefferson Trammell Lee. 

David Marshall Walker Marengo. 

David Louis Whetstone Elmore. 

David Edwin Wilson. Jefferson. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

Harmon Benton, B. Sc .Barbour. 

Benjamin Minge Duggar, B. Sc Hale. 

Charles Bowls Glenn, B. Sc Lee. 

Frank Allemong Lupton, B. Sc Lee. 

CIVIL ENGINEER. 

Seaborn Jesse Buckalew, B. Sc Chambers. 

Charles Cicero Johnson, B. Sc Coosa. 

Alexander Dowling McLennan, B. Sc Barbour. 

MINING ENGINEER. 

William Audley Marshall, B. Sc. . . . Georgia. 





•> 




X I 




DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 



AWARDED CERTIFICATES IN 1892. 



The students of each class who secure a grade above 90 in 

three or more subjects are distinguished for excellence 

in scholarship, and are awarded 

HONOR CERTIFICATES. 
The following students received honor certificates in 1892 : 

Senior Class. 

Leigh Stafford Boyd ......Lee. 

Charles Allen Brown Sumter 

George Samuel Clark Montgomery 

Henry Lee Davidson ; Montgomery. 

Henry Ticknor DeBardeleben .Jefferson. 

Henry Farris Dobbin _ .Florida 

William Francis Feagin \ harbour. 

Baleigh Williams Greene , L ee 

Ealeigh Frederick Hare .,,,"! Lee ' 

Louis Philip Heyman Georgia 

Arthur Lyne Jones An+« 

Bobert Dibrell McAllister .-;:\^' [ .' " ' \ .' [ G ^ 

Frank McLemore Mosley. Monteom 

Leonidas Warren Payne j jee s^ 61 ^' 

Walter Evan Richards nha™\, 

-^j 1T . , ^nambers. 

Edward Broadus Smith L ee 

George Adams Thomas '. V. V. V. '.*. Montgomery 

.Robert Jefferson Trammell Lee. 



— — 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 25 

HONOE STUDENTS IN JUNIOR CLASS. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Robert Lee Gordon Bivins Lee. 

COURSE IN MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING. 

Walter Merritt Riggs South Carolina. 

Thomas Litchfield Kennedy, .Lee. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

Joel Franklin Webb. . Coosa. 

Junior Class. 

Robert Lee Gordon Bivins Lee. 

Massey Robert Burton Lee. 

Walter Scott Crump. . . St. Clair. 

Clarence William Daugette Lee. 

Joel Dumas Wilcox. 

John Henry Holt Georgia. 

Thomas Litchfield Kennedy Lee. 

James Monroe Little Lee. 

Nicholas Barnett Marks Kentucky. 

Edward Baker Mell. . , -Georgia. 

Hampton Knox Miller Talladega. 

Walter Merritt Riggs So. Carolina. 

Joel Franklin Webb . . Coosa. 

Sophmore Class. 

Robert Park Clower • Lee. 

Roseberry Covington Comity . . Macon. 

Ogden Ellery Edwards /. • • • • • Calhoun. 

Charles Gordon Greene Lee. 

Paul Pratt McKeown Florida. 

Peyton Hemdon Moore Blount. 

Peter Preer Georgia. 

Jack Thorington - • • -Montgomery. 

William Douglass Trawick Lee. 

Rinaldo Greene Williams - Lee - 






i» 







V 

26 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Fbeshman Class. 

Frank Stuart Barnes Jefferson. 

David French Boyd Lee. 

Henry Clay Burr Georgia. 

Solon Lycurgus Coleman Perry. 

Benjamin Browning Haralson Dallas. 

Sumpter Lea Harwood Perry. 

Andrew Hamilton Milstead Elmore. 

Henry Hinds Peevey Madison. 

Percy Hilton Smith Georgia. 

John Adams Wills , L ee# 





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



FOR THE SESSION 1892-93. 



-» ♦ 



Graduate Students. 

[Residence is Alabama when State is not named.] 

NA ME. RESIDENCE. 



Charles Allen Brown 

George Samuel Clark 

William Francis Feagin. 
Walter Edward Fitzgerald 
James Edward Gachet. . . 
Baleigh Frederick Hare . 
Louis Philip Heyman . . . 
Frank McLemore Mosley 
Leonidas Warren Payne . 
Walter Evan Eichards . . 
Edward Broadus Smith. 
Bobert Jefferson Trammell 



. Sumter. 

Montgomery. 

Barbour. 

. . . . .Georgia. 
..... juee. 

• • a . . -LitJtJ. 

Georgia. 

. . . . . Montgomery. 

. . . . . JU66. 

Chambers. 

. . . . . JuGe. 

• • . . • -Uvyfc}. 



Senior Class. 



Lee Ashcraft Lauderdale. 

Wallace Reverdy Bishop Talladega. 

Robert Lee Bivins Lee. 

Francis Marshall Boykin Montgomery. 

Massey Robart Burton Lee. 

Walter Scott Crump St - Clain 

Clarence William Daugette Lee- 
Joel Dumas Wllcox> 

Daniel B. Edwards Dallas - 



«t 



1 




i r 



:r 






28 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Thomas Gardner Foster , Montgomery. 

John Henry Holt Georgia. 

Thomas Litchfield Kennedy Lee. 

James Monroe Little Lee. 

James Berry Loveless .Marshall. 

Nicholas Barnett Marks Kentucky. 

Edward Baker Mell Georgia. 

Hampton Knox Miller .Talladega. 

Walter Merritt Eiggs So. Carolina. 

John Shelton Bobinson Jefferson. 

Guy Allen Shafer . . . . Perry. 

Charles Henry Smith Georgia. 

Henry Hamilton Smith .Montgomery- 

Linton Sparks Smith " Georgia. 

Eosser Colbert Spratling Chambers. 

Margaret Kate Teague L ee 

Sheldon Lynn Toomer ; , . . Lee 

Joel Franklin Webb '. \\ \ \\\ \\\\ Coosa 

Thomas Felton Wimberly L ee 

Junior Class. 
George Smith Anderson ' # L ee 

Champe Seabury Andrews .7.7.7.7 .".Tennessee. 

Kate Conway Broun -r 

John Morgan Burns D 11 

Greene Watley Carlisle L 

William DeLamar Clayton. t 

Eobert Park Clower t 

Eoseberr y Covington Conner Maco 

Eobert David Conner M ** 

Palmer Payne Daugette ! . . L ^^ 

Charles Fairchild DeBardeleben tJ#1 

T , _ • ^lyjKJKiu eienersou 

Joseph Addison Driver t> 

t> t mi ^ * Perry. 

liufus Thomas Dorsey . p • 

Waverly Goode Duggar . . .' Z'Z 7777.7. .' .' .* f^ 

James Aichibald Duncan p ike 

Julius Confree Dunham \i/r~ 1 

m Montgomery. 






Agrkmltural and Mechanical, College, 29 

Charles Dunlap i Madison. 

James Dunlap Madison. 

John Thomas Eckford . .Lee. 

Ogden Ellery Edwards Calhoun. 

Thomas Preston Flanagan Lee. 

Robert Cherry Foy .Barbour. 

Frederic Almet Fulghum Jefferson. 

Jackson Wise Gammill > . . Chambers. 

Charles Gordon Greene . . .^ Lee. 

Crosland Clarence Hare Lee. 

Augustus J. Harris Morgan. 

Arthur William Holstun Lee. 

Jacob Samuel Johnson Autauga. 

Jesse Drewry Lane; . Eandolph. 

Sidney Leach • Tuscaloosa. 

Willie Gertrude Little Lee. 

Paul Pratt McKeown .Florida. 

Herman Meislahn Florida. 

Lauriston Greene Moore . . . -Lee. 

Peyton Herndon Moore Blount. 

William Washington Moore • • Blount. 

Peter Preer ....Georgia. 

Samuel Arthur Eedding • • • -Georgia. 

Joseph Beady Rudulph Lowndes. 

John Presley Slaton Macon - 

Jack Thorington. . . . • • Montgomery. 

Frank Atkinson Vernon • • Chambers. 

Einaldo Greene Williams Lee - 

Arthur Zachariah Wright • • • • Lee - 

Cary Oscar Wright. ^ ee - 

Graham Golson Vaughan ; • • • . -Dallas. 

Sophomore Class. 

Daniel Spigner Anderson. Lee. 

Kobert Higgins Adams ^ lke * 

Walter Scott Askew • ■ • • r ■ f^™' 

Frank Stuart Barnes • • * e 






«i 




I 1 




30 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

David French Boyd Lee. 

Frank Asbury Boy kin Lee. 

George Perkins Bondurant Lee. 

Henry Clay Burr Georgia. 

William Wallace Bussey Georgia- 
Gordon Flewellen Chambers Lee. 

Sir Hugh DeLacy Eussell. 

Robert Eugene Dumas Wilcox. 

Charles Grigsby Foulks Dale. 

William Wherton Fulghum .Jefferson. 

Langdon Bowie Gammon Georgia. 

James Robert Haigler Montgomery. 

William Washington Ham Coffee. 

Benjamin Browning Haralson .Dallas. 

Claud Holstun j^ 

Pleasant Reese Holstun L ee 

Thomas Arnold Hurt Ma Jon. 

William Coats Hurt ..Macon. 

Frederick Ingate. Mobile 

wlT^! iV6r JaDney Montgomery 

WhitKelley.. Q ^ ?' 

Henry Hearst Kyser Talladega. 

Charles Linn j & 

Cary Park McElhaney . j^ 

James Neal McLean . . Mont 

William Cunningham McMillan ..... Talladeea^ 7 

Andrew Hamilton Milstead [[ .Elmore 

James Newsome p 

Henry Hinds Peevey M *% la " 

Tilden Hendricks Phipps f *' 

Walter Russell Shafer ^111^ ' '^rx^ 

Harry Howell Smith erry. 

James Adger Smythe . . . . V. V. '. \[\] \ [ \ ' .' .' .' .' South Carolina 

James Claude Thomason Randol h 

Hugh Pearson Thornton " Jeffe^ ' 

Andrew Hearne Whitman V. V. '.'.'.'.' .'.'.'. Lee. ""^ 

Frank Lewis Whitman # ^ 





Agricultural*and Mechanical College. 31 

John Adams Wills Lee. 

James Alexander Wilson Franklin. 

Freshman Class. 

Alfred Summers Andrews Barbour. 

Balph Emmerson Andrews Pike. 

Erister Ashcraft Lauderdale. 

John Bigham Barnett. .Pike. 

William James Beeson Etowah. 

Charles Inman Belt Georgia. 

Morris Jefferson Burts Georgia. 

Henry Eozier Casey Jefferson. 

Thomas Erwin Collins Georgia. 

Thomas Spyker Cowan Lee. 

James Artemus Culver Georgia. 

Jeptha Thomas Culver Georgia. 

James Washington Culver Lee. 

Walter Earnest Culver Lee. 

William Eozier Daughtry Lee. 

Sterling William Dudley Georgia. 

Walter Micajah Eckford • -Lee. 

John Steele Edwards Marengo. 

Clifton Henry Feagin Barbour. 

Elmer Wynn Gray • • Georgia. 

John Fletcher Heard • • - Lee - 

Charles Wadsworth Hill Greene. 

George Michael Holley Georgia 

Robert Campbell Holley South Carolina. 

John Asa Hudson . "^TV 

James Kirkland Inabinet South Carolina. 

Richard Sparks Jackson • Jefferson. 

Carie William Jenkins ZT^ 

Arthur Daniel Johnson Ge^iT* 

Baxter Jones • • g 

Strother Trahne Key i*^* 

Earle Foster Lee ' . 

Fuller McLaren Longley Georgia. 













32 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Hubert Johnston Magruder Florida. • 

Oscar Leonidas McKinstry Pickens. 

George Emmet Pace . . s Pike. 

Charles Lynn Pringle Washington . 

John Alvin Beeves Cherokee. 

Edward Baxter Sloss .Jefferson. 

Bobert Milard Stevens , Barbour. 

David Compton Tallichet Marengo. 

Benjamin Asberry Taylor Autauga. 

Douglass Taylor Madison. 

William Abner Tippin Florida. 

James Bichard Torbert Macon. 

Frank Turner Georgia. 

Clarence William White Georgia. 

John Hudson White , . Georgia. 

Bryce Hewitt Wilson Franklin. 

Charles Wilson . Franklin 

William Herring Winship . . Georgia. 

Frederic Henry Winston ;L ee . 

John Banks Yonge Georgia. 

Special and Irregular Students. 

Bobert Emmet Anderson^. . . Georgia 

Warren Elbert Andrews Pike 

George Doan Boruss Montgomery. 

James Vandiver Brown. Georgia 

William Henry Chambers , . ..Lee 

Solon Lycurgus Coleman Perrv 

Thomas Cowper Daniels North Carolina. 

Sumpter Lea Harwood Perrv 

Cassey Rex Hudson. . . L ee 

Walter Lee Humphrey. Madison. 

Jerimiah Jackson j^x 

Byron Watts Jones . . L ee 

John Allen Jones. . L ee 

Welborn Jones j jee 

Hunter Allen Lang ///////. Jefferson. 

Frank Inman McRee Georgia. 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 33 

Oscar Granville McPhail Georgia. 

Edward Charles Mandy Jefferson. 

John D. Martin « .Barbour. 

James Pinkney Palmer .Calhoun. 

George Orr Shackelford Georgia. 

Samuel James Shivers Dallas. 

Joseph Franklin Siler Pike. 

Percy Hilton Smith Georgia. 

Eobert Otis Stone Mobile. 

Hallett Webster Thompson Dallas. 

James Walker Eandolph. 

Henry Clayton Walthour Barbour. 

William Dunbar Wills. . : Lee. 

■ 

Sub-Freshman Class. , 

Paul Otey Anderson Lee. 

Samuel Eutherford Bondurant Lee. 

George Adair Christian Calhoun. 

Brooks Carlisle % Lee. 

Edge worth Stephens Casey .Jefferson. 

Maury Cecil » Tennessee. 

Walter Marvin Culver. Georgia. 

John Douglass • • • • Franklin. 

Walter Jefferson Dudley Georgia. 

George Dudley Glass .Tennessee. 

Walter Hampton Godwin. . * Georgia. 

Charles Edwin Goulding • • • Florida. 

David Barnebus Harrell ,. Georgia. 

Milledge Henry Hart Georgia. 

Author Marvin Herron Montgomery. 

Charles Leitner Howard : Georgia. 

Edward Camot Janney Montgomery. 

Leon Joseph • Jefferson. 

John Furniss Knowlen. . . . . . Dallas * 

William Anderson Kline • Lee * 

Josiah Thomas Mangum Lea . 

George Eugene Miller Georgia. 

3 









U 




34 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



m 



John Boyd Nabers Jefferson. 

John Purifoy Montgomery. 

"William Cary Slocumb Lee. 

James Leonard Thomas Lee. 

Leonard Alvie Thomas Lee. 

John Norton Todd Montgomery. 

Edward Eichardson Upliam Mobile. 

Eugene David Whatley Dallas. 

Summary. 

Graduates v, ; J2 

Senior Class 28 

Junior Class 47 

Sophomore Class 43 

Freshman Class 53 

Special and Irregular Students 30 



Total in College Classes ... 1 . . 213 

Sub-Freshman Class # 30 



Total 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN 

English... 220 

History. 124 

French 31 

German 30 

Latin g4 

Mental Science 16 

Political Economy ... 26 

Mathematics 182 

Chemistry. 96 

Analytical Chemistry. . 49 

Agriculture 103 

Physics 129 



EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 

Botany 

Geology 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering. . 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Drawing 

Mechanic Arts. 

Military Tactics 

Photography 

Mineralogy 

Physical Laboratory . . . 
Veterinary Science 



243 

44 

32 

11 

35 

25 

144 

156 

221 

10 

14 

22 

25 







Military Organization, 



^v 



1892-93. 



\ 



>J*HNK' 



President : 
W. L. BROUN. 

Commandant : 
JOHN H. WILLS, 1st Lt. 22nd Infantry. 

Surgeon : 
J. H. DRAKE. 

Battalion Staff: 

Cadet 1st Lieutenant J. F. WEBB, Adjutant. 

Cadet 1st Lieutenant J. H. HOLT, Quartermaster. 

Cadet Sergeant R. T. DORSEY, Sergeant Major. 

Cadet Sergeant 0. S. ANDREWS, Quartermaster Sergeant. 



1. Joel Dumas, 

2. C. H. Smith, 



1. W. R. Bishop, 

2. R. L. Bivins, 

3. W. M. Riggs, 

4. H. K. Miller, 



Cadet Captains : 

3. W. S. Crump, 

4. E. B. Mell. 

Cadet 1st Lieutenants: 

5. T. G. Foster, 

6. F. M. Boykin, 

7. M. R. Burton, 

8. J. M. Little. 



Cadet 2nd Lieutenants: 
1. G. A. Shafee, 3- T ' L " KBNNEDY ' 



2. C. W. Daugette, 



4. Lee Ashcrapt. 



1. 
2. 



Cadet 1st Sergeants: 
P.P.McKeown, 3. C.J.Dunlap, 



Jack Thorington, 



4. R. C. Foy. 







36 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



1. F. A. Fulghum, 

2. J. C. Dunham, 

3. W.W.Moore, 

4. G. S. Anderson, 

5. C. G. Greene, 

6. R. C. Conner, 

7. R. G. Williams, 



Cadet Sergeants: 

8. J. A. Driver, 

9. C. F. DeBardeleben, 

10. Peter Preer, 

11. 0. E. Edwards, 

12. S. A. Redding, 

13. Sidney Leach, 

14. G. G. Vaughan, 
15. P. H. Moore. 



1. H. H. Peevey, 

2. S. L. Coleman, 

3. S. L. Harwood, 

4. R. E. Dumas, 

5. G. 0. Janney, 

6. H. C. Burr, 



Cadtt Corporals: 

7. L. B. Gammon, 

8. Claud Holstun, 

9. J. A. Wills, 

10. W. C. McMillan, 

11. J. A. Wilson, 

12. J. A. Smythe, 
13. W. C. Hurt. 




*" 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



37 



/ 



k- 



BEQUIREMENTS FOE ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission must be of good moral character. 
To enter the freshman class the applicant must be not less 
than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified to pass a 
satisfactory examination on the following subjects: 

1. Geography and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) An examination upon sentences con- 
taining incorrect English, (b) A composition giving evi- 
dence of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, 
grammar and division into paragraphs. 

The composition in 1 893 will be upon subjects drawn from one or more 
of the following works : Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and Merchant of 
Venice, Longfellow's Evangeline, Irving's Sketch Book, Scott's Mar- 
mion, Hughes's Tom Brown at Rugby, Dickens's David Copperfield, 
Scott's Ivanhoe, Hawthorne's House of the Seven Gables. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, including fundamental 
operations ; common and decimal fractions; denominate num- 
bers ; the metric system ; percentage, including interest and 
discount; proportion; extraction of square and cube roots, 
(b) Algebra, to quadratic equations. 

Those applicants who desire to continue the study of Latin 
should be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination in Latin 
grammar and the first two books of Caesar, in addition to the 

above subjects. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should be 
prepared to stand a satisfactory examination on all the 
studies of the lower classes, as shown in the courses of 
study. Where opportunity has not been offered to pursue 
special studies required at this College, the system of equiv- 
alents will be adopted, and studies which denote an equiva- 
lent amount of discipline and training will be accepted as 
satisfactory. 











38 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
ADMISSION OF YOUNG WOMEN. 



The privilege of becoming students in this College is 
granted by the Trustees to young women of mature mind 
and character, on the following conditions: 

The applicant must be eighteen years of age and be 
able to pass a satisfactory examination in two of the follow- 
ing subjects, one of which must be Mathematics: 

(a). In English— Proficiency in spelling and punctuation; 
Grammar (Whitney's Essentials of English) ; Rhetoric 
(Lockwood, Abbott's How to Write Clearly, Genung) ; 
Scudder's American Prose Selections; Scudder's American 
Poems. 

(b). In History— Macy's Our Government; Johnston's 
History of the United States ; Myers's General History. 

(c). In Mathematics — Arithmetic; Algebra, including 
quadratic equations, logarithms and series; Plane and Solid 
Geometry ; Plane and Analytical Trigonometry, as in Went- 
worth. 

(d). In Latin — Grammar, including the forms and syn- 
tax ; Jones's Latin Prose Composition ; Translations of selec- 
tions from Caesar, Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Cicero's 
Letters, or the equivalent. 

The equivalents of these subjects, as in above text-books, 
may be substituted. 

If the applicant is a candidate for a degree, she will be 
required to pass a satisfactory examination in each of the 
four subjects named. 

Certificates will be granted to those who are not candidates 
for a degree upon the satisfactory completion of any subject 
as pursued by the Senior class. 

When admitted, upon complying with the conditions above 
stated, they can enter upon the study of any subjects taught 
in the College, join any class, and enter any laboratory, for 
which, upon examination, they may be found qualified. The 




/ Agricultural and Mechanical. College. 



39 



only condition imposed will be that they engage in earnest 
study, and attend the exercises regularly. They will board 
in the village with private families, and attend College only at 
the hours of their exercises. 

There will be no charge for tuition. The incidental fees, 
amounting to $12.00 per year, will be paid, as stated else- 
where in the Catalogue. 

ENTEANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, the 
13th of September, the day on which the session opens. Can- 
didates will also be examined during the session, when appli- 
cation is made for admission. 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 
examinations for full admission to the Freshman class are 
admitted to the sub-college department. 

They will be advanced to full admission to the Freshman 
class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily the 
required examinations. 

Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report immediately to the 
President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any class 
previous to matriculation. 

NOMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIEED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen 
recitations per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the 
exercises in laboratory work, drawing and military drill. 
These additional exercises occupy not less than twelve hours 
per week and in all give twenty-seven exercises per week 
required. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Students who are qualified to prosecute the studies of the 
Jnnior class, and those over twenty-one years of « ige who are 
not candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, with the 






. 







? 



I 



40 



Agricultural and Meelianical CoUegei 



advice of the Faculty, the subjects of ^tudy they may prefer 
and for which they may be qualified ; all other students will 
be assigned to one of the regular prescribed courses of 
study, unless for special reasons otherwise ordered by the 
Faculty. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final exam- 
inations in any one study become special students. They 
will be classed as regular students pursuing a course for a 
degree, whenever they can pass the examinations in those 
subjects in which they were found deficient. 

Students, candidates for a degree, who are are not in full 
standing in all the prescribed studies of a class, rank in the 
military department with that class in which they have the 
greater number of studies, and their names are so placed in 
the Catalogue. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and 
Natural Sciences, with their applications; Agriculture, Biol- 
ogy, Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Drawing, Civil, 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, English, French, 
German, and Latin Languages, History, Political Economy! 
Mental and Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to offer 
a liberal and practical education as a preparation for the 
active pursuits of life. 

There are four degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and 
requiring four years for its completion: 

I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 

Course in Mechanics and Civil Engineering. 
Course in Electrical and Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 
IV. General Course, 



II. 

in. 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



41 



There are also two partial courses, each requiring two 
years for its completion: 

V. Two -Year Course in Agriculture. 
VI. Two-Year Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I includes theoretical and practical instruction in 
those branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and 
is especially adapted to those who propose to devote them- 
selves to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II includes the principles and applications of the 
sciences thai directly relate to civil engineering, and is 
adapted to those who expect to enter that profession. 

Course III includes, besides the general principles and 
applications of the sciences, a special course in the applica- 
tions of electricity and mechanics, and is arranged for the 
profession of electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Course IV has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language to 
meet the wants of those students who have selected no defi- 
nite vocation in life, as well as of those who propose ulti- 
mately to engage in teaching, or in some commercial or man- 
ufacturing business. 

Courses V and VI have been arranged for the benefit of 
those students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, 
are unable to continue at college four years and to take one of 
the regular degree courses. 

Students who complete either of these two-year courses 
will, on passing a satisfactory examination, receive certifi- 
cates indicating their attainments. 

Those who have completed the general course in each de- 
partment of the school of Mechanic Arts, and are qualified, 
can enter upon a more extended technical course in mechan- 
ical engineering. 


















42 Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

PREPARATORY COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

Students who expect to become practical pharmacists can 
enter upon a special course of Chemistry and Natural His- 
tory and occupy all their time in the laboratories of these 
departments, under the immediate direction of the professors. 
With the excellent facilities offered in the chemical and bo- 
tanical laboratories, scientific preparation of great value to 
the practical pharmacist can be obtained. 

COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

Students who have received the degree of B. Sc. in Engi- 
neering, or who have prosecuted an equivalent course of 
study, can enter upon a special course of Mining Engineer- 
ing, which includes the following subjects of study, and will 
require a residence of one year: 

Industrial Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of Ores, Min- 
eralogy, Economic Geology, Mining Machinery, Drifting, 
Tunnelling, Timbering, Ore Dressing, and the various opera- 
tions connected with the exploitation of mines. 

This course of study will be under the charge of the Pro- 
fessors of Chemistry, Engineering and Natural History. 

SPECIAL ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study Agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class under 
the Professor of Agriculture, and will be excused from reciting in any 
other class, from military duty, and from all other college duties ; but 
will be under the general college regulations, and will be required to 
have their time fully occupied. 

They can attend the lectures in Agriculture in all the classes and 
engage in the practical work at the experiment station, in the field 
stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard, vineyard, etc., and may thus' 
in one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of Scientific A*ricull 
ture. 6 







Agricultural and Mechanical Colkge. 
LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 



43 



Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature in 
the courses of education provided for the students of this 
College, and as far as possible all students are required to 
enter upon laboratory work in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given in the 
following departments: 

I. — Chemistry. 
II.— Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, etc. 

III. — Agriculture. 

IV. — Botany. 
V. — Mineralogy. 

VI. — Biology. 
VII.— Technical Drawing. 
VIII. — Mechanic Arts. 

IX. — Physics. 
X.— Electrical Engineering. 

XL— Special work in History may be taken by Stu- 
dents in the General Course as a substitute 
for Laboratory work. 






44 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 









I— COUESE IN CHEMISTKY AND AGEICULTURE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Second Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



3. Elementary Physics. 3. Element'ry Physiol'gy.2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Labor'y.6. Mechanic Art Labo'ry.6. Mechanic Art Labo'ry 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English. 3. 

3. History. 3. 

5. Mathematics. 5. 

3. General Chemistry. 3. 

2. Agriculture. 2. 

3. Drawing/N^ 3. 

4. Mechanic Art Labo'ry .4. 

2. Practical Agriculture.2. 

3. Military Drill. 3. 



Second Term. 

English. 

History. 

Mathematics. 

General Chemistry. 

Agriculture. 

Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Lat?or'y.4. 
Practical Agriculture. 3. 
Military Drill. 3. 



2. 
3. 
5. 
3. 
2. 
3. 



Third Te»m. 

English. 
Botany (a). 
Mathematics. 
General Chemistry. 
Agriculture. 
Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Labor'y 
Physiology. 
Military Drill. 



First Term. 
3. English. 3. 

3. Physics. 3, 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. 
2. Agriculture. 2. 

4. Botany (Lab'y). 4. 

1. Military Tactics. 1. 
9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. 

3. Military D rill. 3. 

{*) Begins March 1st 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 
English. 
Physics. 

Industrial Chemistry. 
Agriculture. 
Botany (Lab'y). 
Military Tactics. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Science. 
Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 

4. Botany (Lab'y). 

1. Military Tactics. 

9. Chemical Laboratory. 

2. Veterinary Science. 
2. Military Drill. 



_ 



_ 




Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



45 



First Term. 
2. English Literature 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 
2. Geology. 
5. Biology. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 
2. Geology. 



Third Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 
2. Geology. 
5. Biology. 



5. Biology. 
2. Agricultur'l Ch'mistry.2. Agricultur'l Ch'mistry.2. Agricultur'l Ch'mistry. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 

9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. Chemical Laboratory, 2. Chemical Laboratory. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 

II— COUESE IN MECHANICS AND CIVIL 

ENGINEEEING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. , 

3. El. Physiology. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b) 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b) 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 



3. 
3. 
5. 
3. 
2. 
3. 



Third Term. 

English. 
Botany (a) 
Mathematics. 
General Chemistry. 
Agriculture (b). 
Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
Military Drill. 



(a) Botany begins March 1st. 

(b) For Agriculture may be substituted Physical Laboratory. 




















'I 






46 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Fint Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

3. English, French, or 3. English, French, or 3. English, French, or 

German. German. German. 

3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 

4. Lab'y, Mineralogy (a).4. Lab'y, Mineralogy (a).6. Field W'rk,EnguVg(a) 
4. Field Work, Engin'g. 4. Field Work, Engin'g. 3. Military Drill. , 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

2. English Literature (b).5. Political Economy (b).2. Political Economy (b). 



3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

5. Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Tactics. 



3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

5. Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Tactics. 



2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Science. 



2. Astronomy. 
2. Geology. 

4. Mathematics. 

5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Science. 



2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Science. 

Field W'rk, Engineer'g. Field W'rk, Engineer'g. Field W^'rk, Engineer'g. 

'* m.— COUBSE IN ELECTBICAL AND MECHANICAL 
! ENGINEEEING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 
In Freshman and Sophomore classes same as in course in Mechanics and 

Civil Engineering. 
■'"'*• JUNIOR CLASS. 

First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

3. English, French, or 3. English, French, or 3. English, French, or 
German. German. German. 

3. Physics. 3. Physics. 3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

5. Electrical Engineeri'g.5. Electrical Engineeri'g.5. Electrical Engineeri'g 

2. Mech. Engineering. 2. Mech. Engineering. 2. Mech. Engineering. 

4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing.. 

6. Electrical Laboratory .6. Electrical Laboratory .6. Electrical Laboratory 
6. Mech. Art Laboratory.6. Mech. Art Labor atory.6. Mech. Art Laboratory 
1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3^Military Drill. 

(a) Or Mechanic Arts. ' * " 

(b) For Eng. Lit and Pol. Econ. may bt substituted French or German. 




Agricultural and Mechanical, College. 



47 



First Term. 

2. English Literature, 2. 
2. Physics. 2. 

2. Geology. 2. 

3. Mathematics. . 3. 
5. Electrical Engineeri'g.5. 

5. Mech. Engineering. 5. 
2. Electrical Designing. 2. 

6. Electrical Laboratory .6. 
1. Military Science. 1. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

Political Economy. 2. 
Astronomy. 2. 

Geology. 2. 

Mathematics. 4. 

Electrical Engineeri'g.5. 
Mech. Engineering. 5. 
Electrical Designing. 2. 
Electrical Laboratory.6. 
Military Science. 1. 



Third Term 

Political Economy. 
Astronomy. 
Geology. 
Mathematics. 
Electrical Engineeri'g. 
Mech. Engineering. 
Electrical Designing. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Military Science. 




IV.— GENERAL COURSE. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. <, 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. History. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 
Second Term. 



5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

(a) Botany begins March 1st. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 

6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

5. Latin. 

3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 























48 



Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



First Term. 
3. English. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. German. 

3. Latin. 

I. Military Tactics. 
6. Laboratory Work (b). 6. Laboratory Work (b). 6. Laboratory Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. German. 

3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. German. 

3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 



First Term. 

2. English Literature. 
% Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 



Third Term. 

2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 
L Military Science. 



6. Laboratory Work(b). 6. Laboratory Work(b). 6. Laboratory W ork (b). 
quaUned* 8tUdeDt may elCCt the Lab ° ratory of aQ y department for which he may be 



Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
V.— TWO-YEAE COIIESE IN MECHANIC AKTS. 



49 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 
5. English. 



First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

' 5. English. 5. English. 5. English. 

' 2. History. 2. History. 3. History. 

' 5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. Element'ry Physiorgy.2. Agriculture. 



3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



3. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Physics. 



3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing, 



3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Physics. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

12 Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Laby. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

VL— TWO-YEAK COUKSE IN AGEICULTUEE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
Z. Elementary Physics. 3. Element'ry Physiol'gy.2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Draw.ng. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



4 Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill 

2. ZZllI^ultnr,2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agnculture. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 



SECOND YEAR. 
Second Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics